Elevating a pig for gutting

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by GR8LIFE, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. GR8LIFE

    GR8LIFE Well-Known Member

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    I have often wondered how someone would get a pig rigged up so they could gut it if they were not very strong. I was going through the latest issue of Backwoods Home magazine and they happened to have an article on appalachia in the early 1900s and there are some pictures. One of the pictures shows two men gutting a hog and I can see in the background that they have some kind of leverage pole attached to their barn which allowed them to lift the hog. That answered my question. Now if I ever decide to raise a pig, I will know how to get it lifted. It was a simple solution but it hadn't occurred to me.
    Colleen
     
  2. bearkiller

    bearkiller Well-Known Member

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    Colleen,

    For the past many years I've taken the lazy mans way to deal with this problem. I simply use 1/4 inch log chain around the back feet and hoist them up with the front loader on the backhoe. Or if at the neighbors his front loader on his tractor. No problem for weaklings or old farts like me.

    When I was younger I used a gambrel through the "heel" tendons and a 4 or 6/1 block and tackle. That made it pretty easy as well. But I don't much like doing critters bigger than hogs, sheep, and deer. Cows and horses are just too big. Bears I usually do on the ground on a tarp.

    bearkiller
     

  3. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    I like to use the front end loader on our tractor, especially if it's a real big hog.
    Other times I do it this way,
    I have a pipe set across two branches in two trees. (the trees are real close together so the spacing is just right)
    I shoot the hog in the pen, drag it with my pickup 10 ft to the tree and use a come-a-long to get it hoisted up to the right height and tie the hind legs on. ( I run the rope throught the back tendons)

    The tractor is the fastest and easiest, but sometimes I have to use the tree pipe!

    I have seen people clean hogs on the ground like bearkiller said. It's harder to skin and bleed them, but as long as you get them washed good, it shouldn't hurt anything.
    Thanks for the post Colleen, I'm going to have to look up that article! :)
     
  4. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    8 ton hydraulic lift :haha: :haha: but if they're under 70 pounds (and they usually are over here) I'd rather lay them out on the table.
     
  5. mistletoad

    mistletoad Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Around here people seem to use a block and tackle - the same one they use to hoist car engines - you never know what is going to be hanging from the trees one day to the next :)
     
  6. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    It's a good option, if you can manage it. If you're raising your own, then all that more and smaller animals cost you is time (and the feed that the mothers eat while gestating). You may decide that more of that cost is worth it to give less cost in effort for you (and energy to run a freezer) at the slaughtering end. Three 70 pound animals is roughly the equivalent of one 200 pound one, the meat is young and tender and more digestible, and a little effort three times killing small animals may very well be more doable than a major push to handle a big one. Also gives you options: A pig, a lamb, veal from a dairy bull calf, a big turkey, a couple of geese, half a dozen superannuated laying hens, a couple of dozen broilers, knock off one of those durned muscovies for dinner tonight, a couple of catfish from the creek. Flexibility, steady work rather than really MAJOR efforts, can be a good thing.
     
  7. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    If you raise pastured potbellies they will be small enough to pick up and butcher on the tailgate.
    George
     
  8. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Don, you're so right! The young smaller ones taste the best to me! I don't mind putting two or three 50 to 70lbers in the freezer every once in awhile. They are easier to handle and they are soooo tender! :D
     
  9. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    I breed and raise my own. Mostly we do it because the market size is too much for a small family. But we also roast whole with skin on in our barbecue spit and I freeze portions. Our convenience food. :) When I'm tired and don't feel like being in the kitchen I make fried rice with day old rice, soy sauce and a thawed pack of roasted pork stir fry on high for 4 minutes. My son loves it. But I have to say that I raise wild pigs so they don't get to 250 pounds in a timely manner :)
     
  10. BrushBuster

    BrushBuster Well-Known Member

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    hogs on the hog hangers and cows on the front bucket
     
  11. Jan in CO

    Jan in CO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We did one, a 480 pounder I got at the auction for 78.00, in our smaller horse trailer. Put a bucket of water in with her and left her overnight. Then the next morning, shot her in the trailer, and just as we were starting to clean her, hubby got called to a MAJOR house fire, so I told him to go, and granddaughter and I finished up. It was pretty difficult, but we managed. Used a hose to wash out the inside after we got the innards out, and tied the two back legs up to help elevate the entire hog. The hams were so heavy I could hardly lift them to take to the extra fridge to cool before I finished processing. The only real drawback was that the hog destroyed two of the trailer mats overnight, so at a cost of $35 each to replace them, raised the price of the meat! I was a bit leary of getting one so large, but it was pretty good pork, and not as much fat as I expected. We did this in the trailer because my husband freaked out at the size of the hog, telling me we didn't have any place sturdy enough to hang her, and no pen secure enough to put her in. Jan in CO