elevated walkway

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Sparticle, Mar 11, 2005.

  1. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Missouri
    I wanted to build an elevated walkway in my yard due to severe flooding about 150 feet long, now that the dry season is coming up. The more I read about building walls with stone, the more I'm worried this won't work. I thought I'd research about walls since this was going to be an elevated walkway with either stone edging or landscape timber 2 high (2 stones or 2 timbers, not 2 feet). Then I was going to lay landscape lining in the channel and fill with sand and put pavers on top.

    I was worried that walking on the top would push the sand down and stress the edging out? It would be different if you had a hill or a great deal of dirt on one side with just the face of it having the stones or timber. But, an elevated stand-alone walkway about 16" wide, I just can't figure out the logistics?

    I've got the drainage pipes running under the pathway figured out which would be necessary so as not to trap water on one side of the yard or the other. I thought maybe before I poured the sand in the channel, I would nail tension cable in a zig zag pattern horizontally back and forth from one side to another to hold the two sides together. BUT, I don't think I have the body strenth to nail cable to the timbers. I could try. I'd like to avoid nailing if at all possible. Maybe on the outside of the timbers or stone edging I could nail something into the ground to keep them from moving. I could probably get large nails into the ground easier than into the timber. If I decide to use stone, I don't know what I could do?

    I did find some stuff at Home Depot called steel edging for garden borders, but I don't know if that would support the weight of the sand buldging out when the pavers are walked on. But I may be able to nail the spikes that come with it into the ground which is how it's designed.

    Anyway, I may just decide to lay a non-elevated path and just avoid the whole elevation complication by just laying the paver stones directly on the ground. During rainy season the water gets 1-2 feet high in the area I need the walkway. So elevated would be nice. But, the worst part is when the bulk of the water goes down and the ground is so muddy. So if I have to just lay them on the ground I will.

    If anyone has any ideas, please let me know. Keep in mind I weigh about 120 lbs and will be doing this by myself. I can lift about 50-60 lbs max. But, the walkway will need to support about 250 pounds being walked on it. Wish I could put the animals to work on this.
     
  2. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    Ark. Ozark Mtns. (Marion County)
    My suggestion:

    Using landscape timbers for edging is a very good idea. Spike them into place in the ground with short lengths of rebar. Undoubtedly, you'll want to drill a pilot hole through the timbers before spiking. Putting rebar outside the timbers could work, but probably not as well.

    Forget using sand; use crushed rock or pea gravel instead to let the water drain through. (The drain pipes will probably clog up quickly, but use them anyway.) Lay the pavers directly on top of the rock.
    More than likely you'll encounter a few spots that will be softer than others. The pavers will eventually sink somewhat, but you'll be able to take them up and add more crushed rock under them before putting them back down.

    If you lay pavers directly on the muddy ground, they'll sink quite nicely. Depending on how muddy things get, they might sink completely out of sight in a few years.

    I'm not familiar with the steel edging from Home Depot, but most products like that aren't heavy enough to do the job you have in mind.
     

  3. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It didn't dawn on me to drill holes into the timber before spiking. That I can do. Also, I have a load of pea gravel here right now left over from another project. THANKS!