Electricity is coming,Electricity is COMING!!!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by oz in SC, Jun 2, 2005.

  1. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    :haha:

    The power co. called today and they were out on the land yesterday and are going to run power and we will have a temporary power pole put in!!! :D

    Another step towards being able to live up there...

    The small things that make us happy... :haha:
     
  2. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    How much did the temp post cost all together? I'm probably going to get the rv solar set up for my travel trailer (from Sierra Solar) rather than put up a temp post. With TVEC the post will be $250, then I have to become a member of the coop, initialize service with a deposit, and pay an electrician to put up the outlet. Probably $500 - $600 total for the privelege of an electric bill and dependance, LOL (don't mean to discourage you). Placing electric to my new house (when it is built) will be to the tune of $7-$8,000 due to the distance from the road I want to build at- the electric is right there on the road but my property goes back 2000 feet from there and they'll need me to cut down mature hardwoods and build a gravel road for them. I've been calling gas companies and solar companies this morning. I think I can outfit the house with gas/solar for about $15K including gas appliances and I won't have to give the electric company a 30ft. easement right through the middle of my property.
     

  3. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    No idea how much it will cost...LOL
    I think that if we are building a house it is free but if it is for something else we pay...

    We have an underground power transformer on the property line,it just is about 3/10's of a mile from where we want to build...LOL

    We will have some gas appliances as well-spoiled by cooking at work to want to have electric stovetops...

    Also want to have an outdoor wood furnace to heat the house with.

    Solar hot water is a good idea too...

    I also wold like a windmill...

    I would like a lot of things....LOL
     
  4. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Wind was my number one choice but most of the southeast isn't rated for wind power :( The outdoor wood furnaces are great but since I plan to grow very old in this next house I don't want to have a system where I need to go outside to keep the house warm (not to mention cutting wood for it). Gas heat is very efficient from what everyone has told me. Good luck with your place :)
     
  5. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Congrats on getting one step closer to your new home Oz. We moved into our unfinished house seven years ago the first of August, and didn't get electricity until the school year was nearly over. I must say I looked upon the new electric lines with ambivalence.

    After nearly a year without electricity and hauling water from a spring 30 miles to the north, it was nice to at least have electricity.
     
  6. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    gee my first thought was ,the bill is coming,the bill is coming!! congrats one step closer to your dream!!
     
  7. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A furnace? I assume the SC means you are in South Carolina. If I were building a house here in Wisconsin, I would insulate enough to not need a furnace or air conditioning (based on previous experience with a house that I built and lived in for 12 years, but then moved due to employment). What do you need a furnace for in such a warm climate?
    I agree about solar hot water--the quickest payback from solar or alternative energy is usually solar heated domestic water.

    Jim
     
  8. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    The land is in NC and it gets cold there...well cold to us.. :D it would be like Summer to y'all... :haha:

    We have a wood stove in our house here and it gets to freezing maybe a few times a year...

    Now A/C is a different matter...you would DIE without A/C here...

    Yes we will have a power bill BUT we will be able to have a house built and actually stay on the land once there is some sort of structure,be it barn,shed or what have you.
     
  9. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    James, I never heard of such a thing!?!?!? How could insulate so much to keep you from needing a heat source in Wisconsin? Tell me more.....
     
  10. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

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    Congrats! :dance: :dance: :dance:
     
  11. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm naughty... My first thought was, "I didn't know it was even breathing very hard..."

    Pony!
     
  12. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Oz, if you get the chance MARK out with stakes and flags and glowing orange paint WHERE you'd like both your temporary and especially your permanent pole placed. Have the the field crew and engineer see and agree to this.

    Otherwise (any maybe even if you do indicate it will inevitably always be placed in the most inappropriate and least aesthetic spot imaginable.

    If you are going to power in outbuildings consider the pole placement relative to their positions also.
     
  13. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    Congrats Oz!

    We just moved into our new home 1 year ago. Our temporary pole cost us about $100.00, and we traded work with the contractor who buried our electric line when the home was finished. (Because of ice storms we opted to bury it instead of going overhead). I like having electricity, and I can always throw the switch if I want to "rough it" for a while.

    So far as an outdoor wood furnace goes, they ARE nice. The only thing to keep in mind is that when/if the power goes out you'll need a generator to power the blower to actually move heat into the house, and pump the water through the furnace.

    Sounds like your own your way home!!
     
  14. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    I've seen many designs where you can build a net zero home. If you look up solar heating or passive heating on google. The real problem with these designs is the initial cost can be so high.

    I read a artical about a dormatory being built in vermont. They had the money to spend how they wanted. But even with that they did put in a small furnace. I think 50,000Btu. for a 10 unit building. This was very good. But not Net zero. They talked about R60 in the roof and R38 in the walls. Double doors to stop heat loss. Stuff like that. large solar collectors.

    As a side note you may or may not know in that area of the country most houses have 125,000 Btu boilers or furnaces. A 50,000 Btu furnace would generally be used to heat just one of those units if built to the standard today.