electrical question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Milking Mom, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    regarding an instantaneous hot water heater. If it is 208v and requires a 12awg wire, does that mean this has to be wired into 220? Thanks
     
  2. Ken in Maine

    Ken in Maine Well-Known Member

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  3. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    NO, if it's a 208V water, it needs to be wired into 208V, which is part of a commericial 3-phase electric service. You'll burn it up if you hook it up to the 240v in your house.
     
  4. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .................You , NEED to call a Licensed Electrician to do the wiring on this type of installation . 3 Phase is MORE efficient that single Phase 240 volt service and will consume LESS wattage but is alittle more complex to wire in . Most homes donot have 3 phase service as it is more in tune with Commercial Business applications rather than a private residence . Just guessing but I'll bet the Power company would want a Small Fortune to setup 3 Phase service to a private residence . fordy.. :eek: :)
     
  5. Kadiddylak

    Kadiddylak Member

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    If you know someone with electrical knowledge have them check your service to see what is there. 208v doesnt mean its commercial .
    Here in TX it could be 208v or 220 or 240v service to your house.
    The water heater should have shunts inside to adjust for proper voltage input. There is what they call a high and a low leg .Depends how many services are being pulled off the transformers and so on.
    When i say check your service i mean with a meter.
    Be very careful with electricty . if your unsure or dont have someone to check it call a electrican .They can check it out and probably will only charge a service fee.
     
  6. Also check your appliance. If it says 208/240v then you can wire it up to 240v. Check the amp rating also as most water heaters are 30 amp and require a #10 guage wire. #8 for 40 amp.
     
  7. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    Here, let me show you what I am talking about.

    It is a water heater single point usage. I'll try to post the site just scroll down find the single point unit click on it and then click on specifications and it will pull up the spec sheet. It is model number SP4208.

    http://websearch.cs.com/cs/boomfram...ampTest=1&remove_url=http://www.eemaxinc.com/


    I want to put a unit like this out in my portable building/goat milk parlor to heat water for clean up. There is a subpanel (main electric panel is on house) inside the portable building. There is no 220 run out to the building.

    Any help is appreciated. Thanks
     
  8. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I would run 10 gauge wire. The unit pulls 19.7 amp. No. 12 is only rated for 20 amps so you are right at the wire rating. Then if you have to pull any distance at all to get power there you're going to have voltage drop and your unit is not going to perform as it should. That unit is not 3-phase. Most appliances have a 10% variance in the voltage. In other words, if the voltage is rated at 208 volts it should operate fine at any voltage from 197 to 240.
     
  9. Stillponds

    Stillponds Active Member

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  10. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They mention several models or wiring styles:

    Several voltage format - voltage types include 110,120, 208, 220, 240, 277

    The Adobe specs page doesn't open on my old software so I can't see the models....

    Curretly you would need the 110/120 model, the 220/220 would be better. Likely it is all the same unit with slightly different wiring.

    It will pull the same number of watts, so what is important to look at are the amps you need - it will likely take 2x as many amps if you are running it on 110/120 vs running it on 220/240. Your wire size will need to match the number of amps flowing to the heater. Generally it is difficult to get enough amps through a wire at 120v to make a tankless work - you would need a pretty thick wire to your building on the 120 to work. I think you will either need to rewire to your building for 220, or look into the small tank type for your current electrical setup.

    Something else to look at is the 3/8" input it has, with a flow restrictor to slow the water down. Be sure this is enough water flow for your needs.

    --->Paul
     
  11. jgbndaudio

    jgbndaudio Well-Known Member

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    Hello,

    You might consider getting a small propane tank and a propane instant hot water heater. That would be more efficient, unless you're paying a very low amount for your electricity per KWH. Electric hot water heaters are the least effiecient way to heat your water. (btu to btu)
    Scotty


     
  12. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm on the other computer now, so I can see the specs.

    Those 208v models are not a typical rating for USA home power. It would most likely relate to the 3 phase others have mentioned, or may be a standard for some other country. It will not work with 120v, and likely would not work with a regular 220v USA setup. I would have _lots_ of questions from the manufaturer before getting either of those 208 models.

    The 110v models all require 10 ga wire at least. I will suspect your barn had 12ga run to it from the house, and so your wire setup is not good enough for any of the 110 models. Distance counts, if you are more than 100 feet from the box in your basement then you should step up to 8 gauge wire. For real long runs, you might need a bigger wire yet. It would be possible to see the gauge of wire in either box to know what you have now. You realize if you have 10 gauge wire & use the 110 heater it is using the whole wire, and you really shouldn't even have a light bulb on. So likely you have undersized wiring for _any_ of these heaters.

    If you upgrade the wiring, your best option is to run a 220 wire to the barn. It can be done just as you have the current setup. Make it a big enough gauge to accomidate loads. The nice thing about 220 is that at the barn it can be split into 2 different 110 circuts so you can do a lot more. As well as used together for 220 loads.

    Then you could set up many different types of 220v water heaters, including either of the 220 models from that site. I see those heaters are set up to deliver no more than 1/2 gallon hot water per minute. If you end up needing a 5 gallon pail of hot water, you realize you will be waiting 10 minutes. Just for a handle on the water flow issue I mentioned before. I do not know your needs, but 1/2 gal per minute is a low flow to be sure.

    It really is not that expensive to run a good 220v wire feed, I would do that rather than trying to find a 110v heater - I think results would be unsatisfactory. You just can't put enough electricity through a regular 110v wire to be effective. (Water flow would be down to 1/4 gal per minute basically....)

    --->Paul
     
  13. MikeD

    MikeD Well-Known Member

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    I might tend to agree with JG in that propane might be an option unless you're absolutely sold on using an electric unit. I've seen "portable" water heating units set up on wheels and a pole to mount the heater unit and propane tank and then wheeled around to wash horses. Hook up the hose and off you go...

    I've been running an Aquastar 125 gas unit in a rental apartment for nearly 5 years now. Once it was installed I've never had to think about the unit again. And they're is always an unlimited supply of hot water. The only thing I wish I had done was gone with an electronic ignition instead of the standing pilot.
     
  14. Milking Mom

    Milking Mom COTTON EYED DOES

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    Thanks for all the help and suggestions.