Electric Start Genny

Discussion in 'Alternative Energy' started by Tango, Jun 11, 2006.

  1. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Need to replace my pull start genny. It's less than a year old but I hurt my back a week ago and have discovered a pull start is really for the stronger among us. After my surgery I couldn't start it either and had it not been for my son, I would have been without water. I only use it for the well motor- 5200 running watts- but was thinking that eventually I might need something as back up power when I get the fridge and then later on when I get a Staber washing machine and a small sundanzer freezer. So one that could charge my battery bank seems like a likely candidate- though not if it is out of my financial reach. My hugest(is that a word?) concern is money layout. Cash seems to become more elusive for me. I need less and less and bring in even less tahn that :shrug: What genny would ya'll recommend that has an electric start and can be rigged to charge my batteries? Thank you. :)
     
  2. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have a Generac that is a real workhorse. Starts with no problems in very cold weather. Then we got a Honda that we could start from inside the cabin. Much more finicky about extreme cold temps. We just got the the coolest genny ever. It's a huge propane Kohler that is inside it's own house (super quiet) starts by a light switch inside the house and my DH has it rigged so it turns itself on when the batteries deplete to a certain point. All of a sudden life just got waaay easier.
     

  3. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad life is getting easier for you Lisa. I know when we speak of easy in an off grid house it is relative :) Little conveniences really boost my day too. A Kohler is way outof the question for me and I have so little use for a genny, and want to keep it that way, that it doesn't make sense for me either. I was thinking of something like a Honda. Right now am correspondng with a member to see if my gen can be retrofitted. That would be best for me at present. Later when I have more need of a generator and more resources I'd like a propane Guardian. My propane company has talked to me about it and it was something I had researched in Florida for the hurricane season. But for now, that is also out of the question.
     
  4. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Everything does come slowly...in increments. But the nice thing is: when we add some new thing, it's SO exciting! When I think back to the 18 months of using the outhouse and heating water on the stove for baths..... :) It really makes you appreciate some of the things we used t take for granted.
     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Tis good to appreciate the simple things :) a warm shower, a flushing toilet, a clean bed, a cow to warms one's hands in the cold mornings :hobbyhors
     
  6. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    What happened to your goat milking? They give off alot of body heat while milking. Especially in the summer when it's in the mid-95's here. I remember your posting on a forum many moons ago when you were south of me. For awhile I lost track of you and found you were north of me now. I feel that the extra effort of raising your on livestock for meat, milking goats and having a vegatable garden may not be as easy, but for now it is worth that extra effort. If it were just me I would probably life would be more basic, but don't think my wife wants to live a simplier lifestyle than at the present. :nono: At least I am partially fulfilling a dream that I had in my younger days and enjoying every moment. Good luck in all you do and your dreams be fulfilled. :)
     
  7. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Hey there! :)

    I still have dairy goats but prefer my Jersey cow for conversation, ease on my back, and butter :) I've stopped milking my goat (only had one that would allow it) and have thought of selling them off but they keep the brush down. My lifestyle is basic to the core. Even lost my inverter a few days ago. I'm one tired pup at the end of the day but I think this life is good spiritually, physically, and emotionally. It is what I need and desire.
     
  8. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You are a very interesting person Tango. You were/are an English professor, right? I'd love to hear how you got started on this path...you should write a book.
     
  9. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Lisa, that is very kind of you. I was a professor, LOL, in my latest previous life :) I don't remember exactly how I started on this path but farming was in my blood and filtered out by my mother's generation for the comforts of the suburbs. They did very well but I am a huge failure at all things societal. Learning moo, neigh, baa, woof, dirt, and solar has been such a blessing and upteenth chance for me :)

    BTW, Small Farmer's Journal published an article on my beloved Dragonfly in this quarterly edition. They used her "I just left Canada and I am pooped!" photo. Tis my biggest paying publication to date (a year's subscription)! :hobbyhors
     
  10. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    How about two small Honda's,one now and a second one later when your have the money on hand again.Or need the aditional power?
    We only need a small one to keep batteries charged when camping most of the time.But occasionally might want to go when its hot enough that we would have to run the AC at night to sleep.Someone mentioned that they had bought two small units and just linked them together when they needed more power than one could provide.Sounds like a good idea to me.Would keep the noise down,save gas, and if one unit died at least you would still have one working until you could fix the other.