Electric netting fence question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Jcran, May 24, 2006.

  1. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    Last year I bought some electric netted fencing from Premier Fencing. I had a crappy charger and the goats just went through it with no problem; well, I figgered it all out, got a big zapper and voila, yesterday finally had it all hooked up and let the goats out. First thing two babies did was try to stick their heads through-OWWWWW!!!!!!!! But instead of pulling back, they panicked and shoved through harder, screaming and flipping and completely out of their mind. I raced to the switch, turned it off, unwrapped babies, etc. then started over. Everyone got a lot smarter the second time around, but I am really afraid now to let them out to graze the berries and tall grass while I'm gone. Any info out there? If I have to let them out only when I'm home, that's fine (and pretty much what I'm deciding to do now anyway) but has anyone out there had goats get wary enough that they don't get tangled, or trapped? I'd love any advice from "net users" out there. I love the stuff otherwise.
     
  2. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    I don't like the electric net fencing. We used it for several years in NH, for sheep and goats, and had constant problems with animals going under it (they learned they could lift the bottom -- not hot -- wire with their noses, and slide under), and getting tangled up in it. By the time we quit using it it was a mess of cut and repaired spots. Also, I lost a lamb that got tangled in the fencing when we weren't home.

    And, we had a police visit because of the electronet! Our oldest daughter slept where she could hear what was going on at the back of the house better than we could, and hearing noise out there one night, after dark, she went out barefoot to see what was going on. The fence was laying on the ground and she walked on it and screamed bloody murder. Neighbors heard and thought someone was being killed, so they called the cops! My husband and I, meantime, were just about asleep, and hadn't even heard our daughter scream (our room was at the front of the house, facing the road), so were totally surprised when a policeman knocked on the door! DD explained what had happened, and he left, but it took us a while to get back to sleep!

    Our pasture looked great when we were using the net fencing and moving it every day, but I really was NOT happy with the net fencing.

    Kathleen
     

  3. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i think for goats the single strain electric fence is the better option.
     
  4. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    iwas wondering aboout that. i was thinking or using it for my bcks, does it work well?does an one know?
     
  5. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    debi i have electric fence for some of my does, the yellow 1" strain, three in a row, spaced about a foot or so. the does got zapped the first day and after that didn't go near it. i would not trust it with bucks in rut though.
     
  6. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    Thanks...I think I'm just going to stick with it for when I'm at home.
    Joan
     
  7. Cara

    Cara Well-Known Member

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    Hi Joan,
    We used it for years and loved it. As long as we used their charger, and the battery was good, after the initial zap(which is awful) they were great! Goaties learn pretty quick. We didn't worry about them when we were gone. Hope it goes well for you!

    Cara
     
  8. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    Our bucks in rut will tear down 5 strand electric with their horns. The electirc keeps the does in w/o problems. We built a smaller pasture with field fencing to keep in the bucks.
     
  9. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    As with all electric - it takes enough zap and training. Visibility is also key.

    I've gone from 5 strand to 3 strand with a better charger. I also started using the electronet 35" and it works for everything from chickens to my goats, the hogs, and even the lgd.

    Key is to use a good charger. Don't put the animals in there unless you plan on training them first. You'll need to check the voltage often with a meter. We often are pushing 7,000V through the wires. None of the 'solar' chargers you can get will provide enough shock. I really am enjoying the heck out of premier's Intellishock. Very versatile.

    This works best for us because I move them often. I haven't had problems with the babies running into it or sticking their heads through it.

    You do have to use extra stakes at corners and some areas to keep it from sagging. Moving it in heavy brush is a pain. Other than that, it's the most convenient option where I am!

    Andrea