electric fencing

Discussion in 'Goats' started by goatee, Sep 9, 2005.

  1. goatee

    goatee Active Member

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    Sep 29, 2004
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    PA.
    I put up an electric fence,fairly large area.I have two new does,and one is fairly nervous doe,also i have two bucks about 5 months old that I have had since 10 days old.well I took the two bucks out first since they follow me around and listen pretty good.They are in rut now. The calmer of the 2 walked up and got shocked and then run over to me but the other one that has always been a little wilder put his head thru the fence and then touched the back of his head on the hot wire.Well he jumped right thru the fence and run into the does pasture and then promptly jumped back thru to get over to me.Needless to say he was pretty well shook up so I took them both back in their stalls.Next I tried the does in their pasture and the bigger more skittish doe who I cant take off a leash cause shell run away touched the fence.Well she freaked out and drug me all over the place for a minute or so,I finally got her calmed down but she was so nervous after that she would not eat anything.I didnt even let the calmer doe touch it because by now my nerves were shattered so to speak.I put the does in their barn and then the dog touched the fence and went screaming and running with her tail between her legs and was shaking for two hours.I felt like some kind of sadist after all these things occureed and shut the fence off and havent let anyone out since then.How do you get the goats used to this kind of fenceing without totally freaking them out? I have a lot of money invested in this fence so doing something different is almost not an option.Please let me know how to do this if anyone knows.I am a worry wort about the animals,shoukd I just put them out and let nature take its course.It all seems so mean.
     
  2. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    Location:
    Maryland
    What is the spacing on your fence wires? Our main pasture is enclosed by a 6 wire fence spaced bottom up at 6,6,6,8,10,12. It's too tight to get a head thru. The LMs were trained to electric fencing when we got them, so they have never even approach the fence, let alone touch it. We also have fainters, none of whom saw electric before we got them. It took very little time for them to learn that the fence shocked them, but they would occasionally bump into it and get zapped. After about 2 weeks tho, they started staying away from it. The 3 babies took some time as well, but the tight spacing of the lower wires created enough of a physical barrier to keep then from running thru. After a few good shocks, they learned to keep their distance. The most important factor is the goats learning that the fence shocks. It's more a psychological barrier than physical. Our LaManchas have never been shocked by our fence - they have always stay away from it.

    I am putting up a second pasture just for our LaMancha does based on a theory I read that with more power and good training, you can use fewer wires. I used only 3 wires at 18", 28" and 42". Lots of forage and water - everything a goat would want. The bottom wire is still low enough that a full grown LM cannot crawl under it. The other 2 are placed strategically at face and shoulder levels. I do not expect them to get anywhere near the fence.

    Don't worry about the shock. I've touched ours plenty of times, as have the kids. Hurts when it happens, but no lingering pain at all. Just scares them. Soon they learn to stay away from it.
     

  3. tinetine'sgoat

    tinetine'sgoat Luvin' my family in MO

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    I can speak from experience on our fence, I know it's there and I still run into it. Maybe with a little time I'll learn. Our little pygmy seems to have learned from the horses where the wire is, I've never seen her get popped. Maybe she learned from me by watching me get popped. Have you ever seen a pygmy fall over in hysterical laughter? I have... :happy: :eek:
     
  4. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    If they get zapped behind the ears, they move forward to escape it.

    Reposition your wires and/or add cold wires so that they will get zapped before their ears go through. Once they learn what the fence means, you can be a bit more free and easy with your wire spacing.

    Lynda
     
  5. elgordo

    elgordo Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    oregon
    I've found a good way to train any animal is to run a single wire (actually I use a woven rope type or a tape) on one side of a ridged pen. They can learn that they need to STAY AWAY from said wire! Later they can be moved into a pasture that just uses electric. I have a two strand near the house; both the sheep and my goat learned to keep away!. My goat won't even jump over one that's not live. Our pigs wouldn't even cross a wire just lying on the ground! It's actually important that the wire gives them a jolt to remember! One thing I have heard is that when they encounter the fence for the first time, you shouldn't be in the immediate area so they don't associate you with getting zapped!
     
  6. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

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    When we got our billy he was the only goat and he WOULD NOT stay behind any kind of fence so we ran two strands of hot wire around the pen about 6 inches inside the field fence, then we got our does the fence was already in place. We have a pretty powerful charger, it will charge up to 30 miles and so when they hit it they know they've been hit by something. At first, they do want to just charge through it, but after awhile they learn and now I have another small area fenced in with just 3 strands of wire and I only had it on for about a month and now it's never on. They don't even test it.
    Now, keeping a billy on one side with does in heat on the other, well, there may not be a fence strong enough to keep them in. I heard a saying once that said "If it will hold water, it will hold a goat." How true! :)
    You have to teach them to respect the fence first by having it inside another enclosure. I heard a man say once that the way he taught his pigs to respect an electric fence is to run a few strands across the middle of their pen and put the animals on one side and food on the other. They'll soon learn what that fence is all about.
     
  7. caberjim

    caberjim Stableboy III

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    I have heard electric is very good for pigs - 1 wire at nose level.

    Our 6 wire electric fence also keeps a flock of turkeys in. I have even turned the bottom nost wire off since they are too large to squeeze under the 2nd wire w/o touching it.