Electric fencing

Discussion in 'Goats' started by eacrouch, Jul 25, 2006.

  1. eacrouch

    eacrouch Well-Known Member

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    Hello, Those of you who use electric fencing for your goats, could you tell me the specifics about how you use it? How many strands, spacing of strands, voltage, charger type and the such. We are buying 80 acres with about 65 of it in pasture but the pasture only has 4 strand barb wire. We can't afford to refence the whole pasture so we have thought of electric fencing and later do woven wire. Any suggestions or thoughts. Thanks, Erin
     
  2. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

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    I just posted about this a few days ago. My experience thus far with my goats is that to really keep them in with electric you have to have field fence behind it. Right now my goats will sail through three strands of electric. But it is not the wire, but the string and that could make a difference. It the areas where I do have electric with field fence they never get through - and there's chicken grain and alfalfa on the other side!

    I'm in a different situation as we are using the goats to clear our land at it is far from flat - so I do what I can. But just field fence and they climb it and bend it up (but don't get through), just electric and they slip through, both and it works.

    I will take someone's advice here and get cattle panels to make a smaller enclosure where I absolutely know they will stay put in and then do what I can to get a bigger pasture area secured.

    I have read the 5-7 strands of electric is best for goats. More like a predator fence I think.

    kids
     

  3. goatedintoit

    goatedintoit Truly Gems ADGA Nubians

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    I use a six strand fence from Gallagher. They were fantastic in making sure I had all the information to set it up properly. It's 3 hot and 3 ground wires. It keeps the goats in and the predators out.

    You can check them out at gallagher.com. The regional rep will come to your place to discuss what you need and then come to help you learn to tie the knots and hook up the charger. There was no additional charges. It was great. :hobbyhors
     
  4. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Erin, I was in a situation similar to yours but with less acreage. My property was fenced with four-stand barb and that was fine while I was raising feeder calves. About a year ago I decided to diversify and began purchasing and raising goats. I left the barbwire up and added three strands of electric aluminum 14-gauge wire approx. eight inches, 14 inches and the top at 24 inches from the ground. All this is backed up with a fifty mile low impedance charger. The goats never go near the wire or barbwire because they believe that both types of wires are hot. One or two curious shocks and that about does the trick. Recently I enlarged one of my fields and expanded it into the woods. This addition has only four strands of hot wire and no barb, this fence wire was pulled at intervals of five t-post notches from the earth, then three notches above that, three notches and then the top wire at five notches for the steers. Never had any animal escapees yet, some folks will that it's not enough strands or the bottom strand is to high. Well I just believe that if they have plenty to eat and they are happy with their routines why bother to test any fence of any kind.

    One more thing, any new goats (newborn or bought) will roam a small electrified 1/2 acre plot that I use as a training ground until they understand the potentials of electricity. Once again four strands with the bottom three closer to the ground than the strands in the main pastures.
    One more thing test your line voltage often and you should have a reading in excess of 5000volts if not you either have poor grounds, a deer has looped your electric onto you barbwire. Just remember 5000 volts plus or you bought a weak charger...
    My son can vouch for output of a quality fence charger, put him on the ground twice in one week ....Love electric fencing.....Tennessee John
     
  5. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Erin, kidsingarden is right that field fencing coupled with electic would be a goat proof matchup, however I just can't afford all that wire so thankfully my systems listed above have worked out great for me....Cost usually dictates application...Enjoy
     
  6. Disco Paul

    Disco Paul Well-Known Member

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    Cannon Falls Minnesota
    Hi,
    I have been using 6 strands of electric. Have not had a problem with them getting out. Used the spacing that they reccomend at Tractor supply. Use a strong charger at least 6 joules. Watch out it hurts.
    Paul
     
  7. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    I'm using electric net fence. No problems yet....two weeks into it.
     
  8. dk_40207

    dk_40207 Well-Known Member

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    We are getting ready to turn them out w/ our cow in 1/2 acrea w/ 5 strands electric, 3 hot 2 not. I'll let you know:)
     
  9. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I use 3 strands of electric. No problem now that I have a charger that tests out at 4650 Volts. The key is to teach them by tricking them into getting hit a few times. Once that is done they won't go near the fence as long as they have plenty to eat inside the fence.