electric fencing

Discussion in 'Goats' started by lscheopner, Apr 22, 2006.

  1. lscheopner

    lscheopner lscheopner

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    We now have 6 goats and want to put them out on pasture since the grass is finally growing. Our buck has proved to be quite the escape artist. Yesterday he decided he was a chicken and was in their house when I went to do chores. He has 8 foot chain link panels around his pen but he rams them until they break apart. If we put a buddy in with him he does it until they are both out.
    This is my question, we want to fence off part of our pasture and wondered if hotwire will work for goats. Right now we have barbwire around it but know it will not keep them in. How many strands would we need? 2 of the goats are 4mo. babies and the rest are adults. We have a fence charger we used for cattle and horses but these guys are more difficult to keep in.

    thanks
    Laina
     
  2. stacygoats

    stacygoats Well-Known Member

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    Electric fence works GREAT with Goats. The odd thing about goats is that if they get their head through between the strands of hotwire and then get shocked they will blast forward through the fence. The trick is the lowest strand has to be 6-8" off the ground and then the next one 8 " higher. You didn't mention what type of goats you had, but I'd plan on going 46" high.
     

  3. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    Electric works great for most of our goats. We use a 6-strand fence, the bottom few wires only about 5" apart. Now, our bucks have gone through this, but it was when we first got them, and we had does in heat too close to them. We have the buck in field fence now and he's never gotten out of the area. The buck that went through the electric fence also had a huge rack, so he just got his horns in between the wires and went right through. If your bucks don't have horns, they might be fine with electric.
     
  4. lscheopner

    lscheopner lscheopner

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    We have nubians and boer goats. Two of the boers have horns the rest do not. We just got this buck last weekend and he is a nice boy but wants to be anywhere but his pen. He was in today but you can see where he is ramming the pen just hasn't broken it yet.

    Laina
     
  5. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I use electric to fence in most of our 70 acres. You need a VERY hot charger(8 output joules at least), and you should "train" them before turning them loose. All my "training" consists of is walking my does into the fence so that they get a really good ZAP(I hold them so they can't bolt through the fence when it zaps them) before I let them out on their own. I don't keep my bucks in electric. They have cattle panels. You can run electric around the inside to keep him from rubbing and ramming the fence, again, VERY hot electric. Use good gavinized wire, not aluminum, I use the biggest wire that is not high tensile. I think its a 14 guage. I can keep that tight and it doesn't snap. Where I have no barb wire, I use 4 strands of electric. Where I have three strands of barb wire, I use three strands of electric in between the barbed, and I stand it out from the barbed so that they come in contact with the electric first. Try the black, "lock-in" type insulators. They are sooooo much better than your typical yellow or black insulators and are worth the extra money. Good luck!!
     
  6. justgojumpit

    justgojumpit Well-Known Member

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    I use six-strand electric, which goes about 4 and a half feet high. First strand about 6" high and then every 6-8 inches for the next 4. Then a big gap to the top wire to discourage jumping.

    justgojumpit
     
  7. cmharris6002

    cmharris6002 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have only does, wethers and a llama. They hold well with three strands. I train them to the fence as mentioned before. I have never had one even try to escape. After they are trained I could hold them with one cold wire if I have to, though I wouldn't push it by leaving them unattended :)
     
  8. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Some people here have mentioned using barbed wire---isn't that risky with goats? Or any animal? It seems these types of fences can do a lot o nasty damage to an errant animal.
     
  9. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, it is NOT a desirable fence for goats.....BUT when you have 100 acres and 50 of it is already fenced with barbed wire....you do what you gotta do. I can't afford to fence in everything with new fence(if I could, my dream fence would be 47" woven wire with two strands of high tensile electric along the top and one strand around the inside about a foot off the ground, around the entire 100 acres....hey, I can dream. :rolleyes: ) so what I did was add three strands of hotwire to my barbed wire fence which keeps the does from even thinking about going through it. Barbed wire works very well for cows, only a very badly done fence is a danger to them. They have thick hides and the barbed wire fencing is their favorite place to scratch..... :p The areas where I put up new fence for the goats is straight electric, four strands. Either way works fine.
     
  10. apirlawz

    apirlawz playing in the dirt

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    Emily, I was hoping that you would be posting on this thread! I had printed out something you'd posted on the dairy board on this subject a while back, and I wanted to ask you about the charger.

    You mentioned a 8 joule output charger...where exactly do you find those?? The highest output I could find was 6. What do you pay for that kind of a charger?

    Part of our new acreage is fenced and hot...if you can call it that. When you touch the wire, it's about the same sensation as putting your tounge on a 9 volt battery. :rolleyes: It will be fine for horses who are not tempted by the greener grass, but the goats would likely not even notice!
     
  11. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Here is where I found mine. And I am VERY pleased with it. http://www.grasslandsupply.com/products.cfm?subCatID=1
    Also these folks are great for answering questions and giving advice for your individual fencing situation. I have the Taylor Fence Brute 8 on their advice. I have not been disapointed!! I paid $258 for my charger. This charger will give a zap that they won't forget, but you should still "train" them before turning them loose in it. If they don't know its hot(it LOOKS harmless after all!), they are likely to stick their head through and then when it zaps them...well, for some reason goats just HAVE to jump on through the fence instead of backing out of it.... :rolleyes: I have touched it several times on accident and it will leave a red mark on my arm if I am well grounded. The other day I unplugged the fence to tighten a strand or two and was working on it behind the barn, with my arm and face resting against the T-post and my hands pulling on the wire.....my sister walked by the charger and decided to do me a favor by plugging it back in like it belonged...... :help: I screamed out and ran around the side of the barn ready to take someones head off!! :flame: I managed to restrain myself but dang, did that ever hurt. :rolleyes: Your goats won't take it lightly. I really was surprised as I was in the group who had just decided that electric fence was never going to contain MY goats......I just had to do it right. :)
     
  12. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Oh this reminds me......Some gentleman e-mailed me about a month or two ago asking a few questions about my experience with goats and electric fence.....before I got around to answering him, my computer crashed and I lost his e-mail. He was from this forum, so if he's on here and sees this....please e-mail me again! I wasn't meaning to ignore your questions! :)
     
  13. apirlawz

    apirlawz playing in the dirt

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    OMG, Emily! If your hair wasn't curly before... For not being funny, that's pretty flippin' funny! :eek: Sorry!

    Thanks for the link. I was looking at chargers both locally and online, and when I would find ones with slightly higher outputs - ie, above 3 joules, I'd be looking at anywhere from $300 up to $500! Of course, I don't think I'd want to use it in the horse pastures, although I know I have to replace the one that's there now...pretty wimpy.

    Thanks again for the info...between you and Vicki, I've got a very full binder!
     
  14. Lancelotacres

    Lancelotacres Well-Known Member

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    We use high tensile fencing exclusively no woven wire here. A lot of the ground we have is heavy clay, so you only want to put in the minimum amount of posts. I've found a person who works for a phone company and another who works for an electric company, they can supply you with used telephone/power poles. Technically they can not charge you anything for the poles, I'm not saying you can't help them out in other ways. The biggest draw back to high tensile are the corner and end H brace assemblies. The corner and end posts must be sunk in the ground four feet! The secondary brace posts only three and half feet deep. If you don't get your corner posts down four feet, when you tighten the wire they will pull out, even if they are concreted in (I've experienced this). I've got a nine inch auger that fits on three point hitch on tractor modified to bore to four foot (any weld shop can modify these). You need line post every hundred feet (only two to three feet deep) on flat ground more on uneven ground. when wires go up I put plastic, poly spacers every twenty feet. If your corner, end posts are over 165 feet you need to double your corner and brace assemblies. I use a six wire system, first wire six inches above ground second six inches above first, third seven inches above second, fourth eight inches above third, fifth nine inches above fourth, sixth ten inches above fifth. From the ground I use hot, hot, ground, hot, ground, hot, I use the ground wires because of the deep snow in winter. With twelve and half gauge galvanized wire and telephone poles this fence is rumored to last 30-40 years with low maintenance. I spray weeds Along it about once every six weeks in the summer time. I use a six joule 100 mile fence charger that will definately leave a lasting impression when touched, as Emily (Ozark Jewels) stated mine too will leave a red welt on skin. Got this first hand yesterday will moving a portahut that had me well grounded. Sorry to ramble on, probably information overload. High tensile lasts a long time with minimal maintence and minimal posts, i've had goats in it for three years with no problems, you have to train them to the wire, once they touch it they will stay away from it. One other draw back is you should unplug it in a lightening storm, electric fence will attract lightening and fry your fence charger (experience again).

    Lance