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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in need of movable fencing until I can get the time to build more permanent fence and rebuild the perimeter fence. The way I figure I will be wanting to fence in a quarter to half acre most of the time and the biggest I could see going with it would be about an acre. So the most wire I'd be running for a 6 strand would be about 3/4 of a mile (figure 800 times 6 wires). That was some bad math it's like 9/10 of a mile.

So what charger should I get? From what I've been reading it seems like they are all either crap brands or complete overkill for my needs.
 

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I'm in need of movable fencing until I can get the time to build more permanent fence and rebuild the perimeter fence. The way I figure I will be wanting to fence in a quarter to half acre most of the time and the biggest I could see going with it would be about an acre. So the most wire I'd be running for a 6 strand would be about 3/4 of a mile (figure 800 times 6 wires). That was some bad math it's like 9/10 of a mile.

So what charger should I get? From what I've been reading it seems like they are all either crap brands or complete overkill for my needs.
What do you need the electric fence for. I had one arsound my garden a few years ago. Just a waste of time as the Deer jumped over it and the Ground Hog went under ground and into my garden. Now i have Dogs that take care of unwanted animals. Got a good 4ft field wire fence around the whole farm. With sections fenced in with field wire. Got a double 4ft. fence around my garden now with barb wire on top. Keeps animals out.
 

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What animals? Are you trying to keep animals in, or out? What is the perimeter fence plan, and on how many acres? Different animals need a different joule zap. Depending on the type of perimeter fence and the length thereof, it may be easiest to just build it. It doesn’t take that long really to build a mile of fence. Then it’s done, and you haven’t spent anything on the electric fence, which is not free either.

More detail needed in my view.
 

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Forgot to mention. Do you have electricity available, or do you need solar? I have suggestions depending on what you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Whoops forgot those details. Property is about 7 acres. My plan is to relocate the electric fence once every week or two. This is for goats, the ones I have now are extremely tame and I don't think they'd need a strong zap but that doesn't mean I'm always going to have tame goats. The perimeter fence only has about 1000 feet on one side that is solid, the rest is falling apart. It wasn't built right and was never maintained, and trees were allowed to grow through it. I'm still dealing with some other problems the previous owner left me before I tackle that fence, and because of amount of trees that grew in and part of my property has a real wonky zigzagged property line. I think it would take me at least 3 weeks to finish going at it full time, and I won't have the time to go at it full time til the 115* days are here. Electric access to the fence won't really be reliable so it will have to be either battery or solar, unless there's a compelling reason to go with battery I think I'd prefer solar so I have one less chore.
 

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Cool. I have seen good reviews on the Parmak solar chargers. I think goats are like sheep in that they need a bigger zap than a cow or a pig to respect the fence. I hear ya on the trees and such compounding the fencing effort. I think moving the fence around and rotating the grazing is a grand idea. We plan to do just that with our sheep this year as we finally have enough space for them. what kind of posts are you planning on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cool. I have seen good reviews on the Parmak solar chargers. I think goats are like sheep in that they need a bigger zap than a cow or a pig to respect the fence. I hear ya on the trees and such compounding the fencing effort. I think moving the fence around and rotating the grazing is a grand idea. We plan to do just that with our sheep this year as we finally have enough space for them. what kind of posts are you planning on?
I was thinking of getting the 5 strand fiberglass posts since that would be easy and not make my hands numb for a week but now that I've had more time to think about it it would be a whole lot easier to put a bunch of 7 foot tposts in and keep em in so when it's time to rotate I just shift the wire to different posts and those posts will already be in the ground when it's time for me to stretch new fencing.
 

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Yeah i bought a few hundred hot pink ( at my daughters request) step in posts this spring. Because hot wire doesn’t need nearly so many posts, I like your idea to have permanent posts. I wondered about that, but our acreage is bigger and also I want to be able to harrow the pasture, overseed with my equipment and elected to not have a bunch of posts in the way for that reason. I borrowed a silver Parmak solar fencer for my pigs last summer and it worked well and kept the battery charged really well. Parmak makes a bronze charger too with more joules and so I think I’ll try one out and see how it works on the sheep. My plan is three wire paddock splitting fences and I hope to move the sheep daily or every other day. High animal impact for a short time is my hope. Watched a lot of Gabe Brown and others and hope to get that system working here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I wondered about that, but our acreage is bigger and also I want to be able to harrow the pasture, overseed with my equipment and elected to not have a bunch of posts in the way for that reason.
I wish that was my problem. I'm trying to balance rotational grazing with not using up my acreage for one operation. My ultimate plan is 3 permanent quarter acre paddocks, a week or two on each and then use temporary fence to set them on what ever 1/2 acre is the most overgrown for as long as it takes them to eat it bare so their "home paddocks" have plenty of time to recover. I may be wrong, because honestly I I learning everything the hard way right now, but I think I have enough overgrown wooded acres for that to be self sustaining enough that two round bales should be all I need for our short winters. The trick that I am counting on is setting up a couple of kiddie pools for my ducks and geese to really muck up and then pumping that water out and spraying it all over the pastures that are recovering. So far in my experience water fowl water is about the best fertilizer you can get.
 

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I use a Parmak electrical fencer chargers. 6-7 Joules have even kept Sasquatch out long enough for me to get my pants and boots on. Most of the off brand models, including the TSC brand, are all the same circuit boards and hardware with different colored and shaped externals.
 

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The 10 Best Electric Fence Chargers


Gallagher Solar
1. Gallagher Solar
The portable Gallagher Solar (about $257) has a built-in six-volt battery and can maintain power for up to three weeks without sunlight, making it ideal for locations where you're far from an electrical outlet. You can reduce the pulse rate at night for when creatures are less active.
  • Water-resistant case
  • Pivots to orient toward sun
  • Installation is simple
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Parker McCrory Digital
2. Parker McCrory Digital
Having a powerful charger won't do you any good if it doesn't cover your entire property. That's why the Parker McCrory Digital (about $245) has a range of 100 miles, and can reach more than six joules to ensure it's got enough kick to repel livestock.
  • Multicolored led lights
  • Voltage meter on unit
  • Three-year warranty
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M300 by Gallagher
3. M300 by Gallagher
Scaring off raccoons and squirrels is fine, but if you need something powerful enough to stop bigger animals, then the M300 by Gallagher (appx. $229) will get their attention. If your beehives have attracted large, ferocious visitors, then this unit could be a literal lifesaver.
  • Works in arid climates
  • Status lights are bright and clear
  • Easy-to-service design
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Patriot PMX350
4. Patriot PMX350
Those looking to enclose a pasture have different needs from casual gardeners, which is why the Patriot PMX350 (appx. $144) is designed for plots of land as big as 200 acres. It can provide as much as 3.5 joules to 65 miles of fence, so horses will know where they can and can't run.
  • Two-year warranty
  • Can stand up to the elements
  • Can't be used with a battery
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Red Snap'r AC
5. Red Snap'r AC
Good for dry climates, the Red Snap'r AC (around $80) was created for maximum effectiveness in heavily weeded areas, so vegetation is no problem. It pulses in 1-second intervals, and is capable of giving a powerful, short shock to anything unfortunate enough to run into it.
  • Works with polywire and polytape
  • No fuses necessary
  • Must be sheltered from weather
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Parmak Magnum
6. Parmak Magnum
If you require extra security but don't want your utility bills to get out of control, the Parmak Magnum (around $285) is a practical solution. It uses solar power to electrify up to 30 miles of fence, and the rechargeable 12-volt battery ensures it works on cloudy days.
  • Housing is durable
  • Good for keeping deer at bay
  • Unit is quite heavy
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Zareba 50-Mile
7. Zareba 50-Mile
With its ample range, the Zareba 50-Mile (appx. $114) is an excellent choice for ranchers. It can pass voltage through the line even in areas with heavy weeds, providing a shock capable of keeping pigs, cows, and horses in while keeping wolves and coyotes out.
  • Reasonably priced
  • Is load-tested to ensure reliability
  • Not for containing small animals
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Cyclops Boss
8. Cyclops Boss
If your main consideration is the amount of juice your energizer can put out, then the Cyclops Boss (appx. $735) is tough to beat. It can emit a massive 30 joules of blistering power, which is enough to give even the largest of animals second thoughts.
  • Heavy-duty surge suppressor
  • Requires six ground rods
  • Extremely expensive
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Powerfields The Trail
9. Powerfields The Trail
Powerfields The Trail (about $104) works well with electric netting in addition to fence wire, giving you options for protecting your property or pasture. It has a built-in hook, so setting it up where you need it is as simple at it could possibly be.
  • Lightweight and portable
  • Batteries last a long time
  • Only for small plots of land
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Stafix X6i
10. Stafix X6i
It doesn't come cheap, but the Stafix X6i (appx. $690) boasts a remote control, a convenience that just might be worth the price. It keeps you from having to walk back to the unit any time you want to turn it off, making maintenance and repairs less of a hassle.
  • Can be solar powered
  • Backlit lcd provides good visibility
  • Knobs could be more clearly marked
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We have a 12 volt solar and it is pretty useless. Luckily our horses are pretty mellow.

A small electric dog charger is 10 times more powerful.

We juat don't have any power at the pastures yet. So we use the solar ones. The 12 volt battery ones aren't much better in my experience.
 
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