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Does the thickness/guage of electric fence wire make a difference in the shock it will give? I have a 10 mile charger, but not more than a mile I need to fence. Will a thicker wire give a greater shock than a thinner one?
 

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agmantoo
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The larger the diameter the less resistance. Therefore, larger wire would deliver a hotter spark. I only use the 12 1/2 gauge as the smaller wire breaks too easily. In a short run I doubt that you could tell a difference in the intensity of the spark
 

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Thicker wire has less resistance, so it will carry more current farther. I like to use aluminum wire since it has the least resistance and will NEVER rust. Plus its much easier to work with. It does cost a little more. I normally use 12 1/2 gauge with my sheep. Horses and cattle are more sensitive to the shock, so you may be able to get by with smaller wire.

http://www.kencove.com/GuideManual4.php
 

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No...its not a current thing,,,,its a voltage thing. at the voltages and currents used on fence chargers, the diameter of wire will have very, very little effect....except the breakage thing others have mentioned.

polywire uses three strands of very small wire,,i would guess it has a diameter of about 0.015 inch diameter.
 

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Perhaps the difference can be measured in a lab, but there will be no noticable difference in the real world.

Your splices are what will be important.

Electric fencers are very high voltage, very low amps. Doesn't take much of a wire to carry that, _if_ all the connections & splices are tip top.

--->Paul
 

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number and spacing of ground rods (yes multiple) are what complete the circut to increase shock. Ground moisture also effects the circut.
If you follow the manufactures directions to a T you will almost always have good results.
 

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ace admirer said:
No...its not a current thing,,,,its a voltage thing. at the voltages and currents used on fence chargers, the diameter of wire will have very, very little effect....except the breakage thing others have mentioned.

polywire uses three strands of very small wire,,i would guess it has a diameter of about 0.015 inch diameter.
I use Polywire for dividing paddocks. The perimeter fence measures over 5000 volts and the Polywire measures 900 volts. SIZE DOES MATTER
 

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I use 17 ga wire and it works fine. My pasture is only about an acre and the tester max's out at 4650 V. I'm not sure how hot it really is since that's as high as the tester measures. One thing for sure and that's my goats won't go near it.
 

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As Barefootfarm stated, SIZE does matter. So does material of the wire. Good joints between to wires, including any switches is very important. And finally current is more important than voltage. Voltage is the potential energy between two points. Current is the flow of electrons thru a medium, measured in amperes. The current is what shocks you, more current equals more kick. Extreme high voltage is that science project that makes your hair stand straight up. It just takes a little bit of current to kill a living thing, especially if the path of travel goes thru your heart.

This is simply Ohm’s law of I = V/R where I is current, V is voltage and R is resistance. So the fence charger is rated by how much voltage it puts out. You control the resistance by how much and what type of fencing you use. The end result is only so much current travels thru the animal back to ground. That’s why you get a big kick in the rear when you touch the fence near the charger and very little shock when to touch the fence at the far end of the polywire netting.

Because I use lots of polywire far from my source (charger) I always buy the “100 mile” model (which I think is rated at 5 joules). Joules is a measurement of potential voltage. Last night I put my sheep in a paddock made with four electronets and about 1000 feet of intelitwine, not including the galvanized steel wire for 1000 feet along the property line from the charger.

I like aluminum wire for the main line going out to the farthest pasture. Aluminum wire has the least resistance so the maximum current flow. Unfortunately it also stretches especially in the heat and is weak so no go for where animals lean on it or deer break it. Take a look at Premier1’s solution of using two types of wire in their polywire; three tinned copper wires for conductivity and three stainless steel wires for strength.

Given the same gauge of wire, from highest conductivity to lowest conductivity (highest resistance = least shock)
Aluminum
Tinned copper
Stainless steel
Galvanized steel

In summary, resistance is what the farmer controls. You want to keep it as low as possible (or get the biggest charger you can buy!)

Yes, I do have a BS degree in Electrical Engineering.
 

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agmantoo
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mem, your main problem is the low output of the charger you have. With a few marginal splices and some weeds along with possibly some polywire your are not going to get the shock you need.
 

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ok not to get in a pee contest,,,,but the joule is a metric measure of power applied per a length of time....so its equal to our watt for one second. so that would be volts (e) x current intensity (i) for a lenth of time. in the case of a(most) fence chargers a few 1/1000's of a second. vir is the old (but valid) emperical formula (i actually like it better that the eir)

one formula that might be worth investigating is the P(power)= e squared / r(resistance). in this formula you will notice that the value of e (voltage) carries a squared value while the r value is linear.

the impediance loading must also be noted in real world problems we are discussing. most(just about all) modern fence chargers are high impediance. in these chargers the resistance of the wire (within reasonsable metalic values) is of marginal concern. that is why weeds (again within reasonable limits) don't tend to short out or load a high impediance charger. if as in an example a fence had a voltage of a little over 5000 volts (3000-4000 is what i consider marginal for beef cattle on a pressured pasture) and a strip pasture is made using poly with a terminal voltage of 900.....my thoughts are that something is "wrong" on the poly wire branch...my poly paddocks measure the same voltage as the perimeter high tensile wire usually between 7000 volts and 4800 volts.

if there is no leakage (mild shorts to ground) then other than capactance loading there should be 0 current flowing on the wire, (a animal would add a load). now if we start flowing an few amps at a low voltage size/material would matter. but if we were pushing amps down a line hundreds of people would be killed by electric fences every year, instead we have a few jokes about what happens.

we are dealing with power, but power at very high voltages and very low amperes.....with low amperes resistance is minimized as an influence....

lets not get into the effect of high voltage seeking the surface of larger circular mill wire while saturating the circular area of smaller wire (the deminishing returns of using larger and larger wire).

sorry i'm not an electrical engineer, so lets try this: run two runs of fence, one with 12 1/2 gage high tensile and one with poly wire say a distance of a mile. both well insulated quality fences. and charged with a high impediance fench charger of 5 to maybe 20 joules and i dare anyone here it stick their neck against either wire (dressed in normal cloths with normal ground moisture). not me. kaddy bar the door
 

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I have 2 acres surrounded by 1 strand of 1/2" poly tape and a 15 mile charger..
let me say this,, with rubber soled shoes you can feel the hit when you sneak under the fence and your back touches it. BUT today after work I was barefoot and the grass was damp... I yelled out and felt like I had a minor burn on my hand that touched the fence!!!!!! I can't give you any scientific numbers and such, but I can tell you this MY fence is HOT!
I also take our Bare mare (horse) down to a lower pasture to graze and all I do is step in some temperary posts and string the same 1/2" tape around it not connected to anything electrified,,, she Never challenges it at all and I leave her there for hours!
 

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---- whatever :shrug:

You right I did not answer the original question: The size of the wire will not make a difference in the shock given.

And mem does not say what type of animal is going to be shocked, so the 10 mile charger might be just fine for horses but no good for sheep.

However the other responses were talking about electrical fencing properties. And I beg to differ on the resistance have an effect even at low amps. The reason one section is higher voltage than another can be do to the loss at joints. Each joining of wires is a resistance that results in a loss of voltage. If you use polywire netting I am sure you have heard the snapping sound at joints where the connections are not good.

Then of course there is the effect of resistance in parallel versus series on the flow of current in fencing. So lets say 1amp of current is flowing down the bare wire but comes to a joint (the netting) where there is 10 wires now instead of one wire. The current is now flowing down ten wires. So 1/10 the amps, but hey you attach another fence (netting) :dance: but it is not connected to all ten wires, instead just five wires. Now that section of fence will not give the same voltage reading as the original bare wire when using the same meter.

Anyway the answer is you need to look at your whole fencing system not just one wire to determine if your animals wil be kept in check. :hobbyhors
 
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