Electric Fence Grounding Question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by YuccaFlatsRanch, Sep 17, 2005.

  1. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Its dry and my solar charger isn't doing a rally good job of shocking. I suspect it is a poor ground. I have 2 hot wires; one across the top of the woven field fence and one about 4 inches from the ground. To better ground the electric fence can I attach the mesh wire fencing (1047-6-12 1/2) directly to the fence charger in addition to the ground wire. The mesh field fence is attached to metal posts in the ground every other post.
     
  2. Wolf mom

    Wolf mom Well-Known Member

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    I don't know abpout the mesh - but you need to keep the soil around the grounding posts damp. I dribble water from the hose overnight to get a deep watering then I pile straw/mouldy hay around my 3 posts to keep the moisture in the soil longer.
    Also, check for weeds touching the wire.
    My animals are shock shy, but I still "walk the fence" every so often, not only for weeds, but I check where the wires are attached. There's elk here (boy, are they in rut now). When they jump the fence, I think they nick the wire sometimes.
    Great fencing. Trial & error always works.
     

  3. Old Jack

    Old Jack Truth Seeker

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    Try using copper rods like you use for residential service, I've seen up to 3 used in sequence before.
    Also, make sure the lower strand isn't grounding out on weeds etc.
     
  4. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    A high majority of electric fence problems can be traded to improper ground AT THE CHARGER. Most system call for three 8' grounding rods, spaced 10' apart, and connected in series with grounding wire. If you go 8' into the ground you are likely going to have them in moist soil.

    As noted, if the ground is very dry, you can slowly run a hose over the tops of the rods to let it soak in deep.
     
  5. Robert

    Robert Active Member

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    I have ran our fenceing system both ways for years now. Our's is hooked to the mesh and the earth. I get better voltage on the fence on the other end of our land.


    Robert Foster
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    As per the directions on most fencers, you should have 3 rods 8' deep.

    Another option is to have alternating stands of grounded & ungrounded wire. Hook the live fencer to the insulated wires, and the ground from the fencer to the grounded strands.

    I believe that is what you are attempting to do? Terms got confusing.....

    So, if any critter touches both a live & a ground wire of the fence, it gets a shock. As well, the ground wires of the fence are grounded to earth at places, such as metal posts. While not very deep, there are many many ground locations, so it does ground the fencer to earth. In super dry areas, a hoof on dry ground is a good insulator & even with a good ground rod, the critter might not feel much unless the uninulated wires are indeed tied into the fencer ground.

    You still should have a post near the fencer direct to ground, deep. In dry locations watering the ground rod sure helps.



    Or, if I understand your question: Yes, that does work. You still want a deep ground rod, and watering it will help.

    --->Paul
     
  7. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .................I've always utilized the fence wire itself as a ground and every 200 feet or so I'd cut an 8 foot ground in half and drive about 3 1\2 feet into the ground and bond to the fence wire . An even better way would be to run a continuous single wire origionating at the ground rods and running it the full length of your fence and bonding it to any other gnd. rods you set out further along the fence . Resistance increases with the length of the wire and increases as the Cross sectional area(diameter) gets smaller . So the larger the wire for a ground the Less Voltage Loss\Drop you'll have due to the distance From the Charger . fordy.. :)
     
  8. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    Try to drive a couple of ground rods in around the drip line of a building without gutters. I use 5/8" rebar, driven about 6 feet deep. Use proper ground clamps to connect the wire to the rods, as the system is only as good as the weakest point.

    Pete
     
  9. MAC

    MAC Active Member

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  10. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I already have the 3 ground rods and they are located adjacent to the charger and I get some electric shock. I just noticed the best shock came near metal posts. Seemed a good idea to take that big ground of many metal posts and see if this helped.

    I use the electric fence as much to keep animals out of the fenced as well as in. It is a great training aid for my anatolian puppies too to get them to respect fences.