Electric chainsaw and recip. saw update

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by caballoviejo, Dec 29, 2005.

  1. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    I bought an 18 volt cordless tool Ryobi package ("The Works") 3 days ago from Home Depot. I returned it today.

    My test for field use was to cut a half inch thick harwood stick. I attempted to cut the stick right over the opened box set.

    Forget it. The chainsaw at full battery charge has too low RPM to do much cutting. I suppose that gives more battery time. It did scrape the surface up pretty good but I would'nt want to hold it above head forever to cut any branches. I switched to the reciprocal saw which had much higher RPM. It cut a litter better with the coarser blade but still took about a minute to cut the half inch and I was bearing down pretty hard. Maybe the blades are just lousy like one finds with some hand tree saw blades.

    So, for light trimming it looks like I'm back to shelling out money for a 12" Stihl.

    For my "bench" work I'm just going to invert my circular way in an insulated box I'll build to hold the saw and to keep down noise while in the motel rooms.
     
  2. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    not familier with the ryobi,have mastercraft 14.4 recip. armed with a blade ment to cut nail encrusted wood. .cutting elm that i can not fit my hand around takes at most 60 seconds and lasts about half an hour per battery.
     

  3. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Help me understand a bit, what are you cutting in motel rooms??? This has me concerned.
     
  4. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, um, if you are doing very much cutting in motel rooms, could you forward me a list of where exactly you will be staying? I would like to avoid there places, if possible. LOL
     
  5. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Zyg, its the bodies. I find them much easier to dispose of when I make the pieces smaller!
     
  6. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Might I suggest cutting them to a manageable size in the field, so to speak, and then using a garbage disposal, much more contained and on top of it you just wash those troubles down the drain... :eek:
     
  7. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Oh,OK,just curious is all.

    BooBoo
     
  8. mikellmikell

    mikellmikell Well-Known Member

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    I'm happy with my Ryobi set and the motel thing has me!!!!!

    mikell
     
  9. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    I've got both corded and cordless recip. saws and was very unhappy with their performance when cutting any kind of wood. It wasn't so much a "saw issue" as a "blade issue". I changed blades to the one listed below and have no more problem. It works very good for pruning.

    SKIL makes a saw blade they call "The Ugly", product number is 9400.
    (NOT "Made in China" - "Made in Switzerland".)
     
  10. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Yeah, I don't get it. My 18v DeWalt will cut right through that stuff and the batteries will last at least a couple hours at a time. The recip that is, I ain't bragging up the skill saw.

    That's assuming your wood was anchored and not just allowed to jitter in your other hand?
     
  11. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You should have been able to cut the half inch stick with your pocket knife. Did you charge the batteries before you started? You can cut most limbs under 1 1/2 inches in 2 seconds with pruners.
     
  12. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Pocket knife, pruners, loppers : cut 50 branches a day for a few weeks every year and arthritis has made my change my mind.
     
  13. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    Well there ya go Ozarks (also Bare and others). I went out and bought a 5 pack of the blade you recommended, went to a friend who has a RYOBI 18v and - what a difference a blade makes! We cut some 1.5 inch oak branches just fine. Does better with the high rpms of a fresh battery howerver.


    How lone or how many cuts to you get before the battery makes the rmp too slow to work well?

    Anyway, I'm going looking for a 24 volt recip. and looking for specs on RPM and amps.

    Thanks greatly for the recommendations.
     
  14. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Really, there's the right tool for every job. I guess it depends on how much heavy trimming I think I'll be doing before choosing a particular tool. I've always been a chainsaw man, because that's all we had, other than hand tools. I got my first and only cordless recip saw just a couple years ago and was pretty wowed, in that it was every bit as powerful as my corded one! Since then, it's often my first choice for packing around the homestead because of it's versatility. I've said before, I wanna holster for the dang thing! Need a new window in the chicken coop? That branch always bugged you? Do I really need to trip over that dang sappling every day? Wanna try it now rooster? Wonder if this thing will cut the top off that old tractor tire for a planter?

    Can't do most of that stuff easily with a chainsaw, but I ain't getting rid of them either. I haven't ever had much luck with the 12" models, but love the Husky rancher, light enough to work over head with and serious power for tougher jobs. I can also put a longer bar on it so I can work close to the ground without doing so much stooping.
     
  15. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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    O.K., so now I'm gonna get spoiled. Thinking about getting a Millwauke 28 volt lithium battery Sawzall. to 3000 strokes per min, weighs no more than an 18 volt, 5 year warranty. Battery run time can double and the battery supposedly gives full power until it stops.

    Milwauke is posting tests for these cutting throught doubled 2.4"s.
     
  16. Ozarks_1

    Ozarks_1 Well-Known Member

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    Hey, bare ... I haven't seen a holster for a recip. saw yet, but I've seen slings for them on eBay.
     
  17. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    GOOD IDEA!! Could even make spare blade pockets for it.

    ::bare, off to fashion a sling for 'ol buzz::
     
  18. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    I hear ya. 18 volt just isnt quite enought for a circular saw. I bought Bosch's 24 volt kit when I really wanted milwuakee but milwaukee didnt make anything bigger than 18 at the time.. That 24 volt circ saw works much better. Miwuakee finnaly came out with 28 volt so I sold my Bosch to my brother and bouhgt the milwuakee
     
  19. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    well you just dont have the right blade for your sawzall,if you get get the right blade it will walk right through your prunning jobs. Find a little mom and pop sharpening shop. The will have the expertise to tell you the right blade to buy, and might even stock them.