electo-netting

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by .netDude, Aug 10, 2006.

  1. .netDude

    .netDude Well-Known Member

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    A Highlands post prompted me to ask something I have been wondering about for awhile.
    How does that electric netting from premier or kencove work with pigs? I've been reluctant to use a couple strands because I'm not home during the day (I know, lots of people report success with it, but I can't risk pigs in the road). Think the netting is more secure?
     
  2. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    i am using 3 strands of polywire with zero problems after training. There were 2 escapes from pigcatraz in the initial day, but i then watered the fence line well and let them try it again. Now they wont go near it on a bet! I am using a battery fence controller tho instead of an ac one
     

  3. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    My opinion is that if you are away all day every day and there is a possibility of your livestock entering a road allowance there is no electric alternative that is 100% secure. If the wire or netting or whatever you decide to use is somehow made de-electrified you run the very real risk of having escapes. I have had no escapes this past year with a simple 2 strand electric tape, but they still get stung by the fence at least once or twice a week by accident. I can't help but think that if they touch it by accident and don't get bit, there is the chance for escape. I am not worried though because the worst case scenario for me is that they enter the fenced corn patch...big deal. Somebody hits your pig on the road, you're liable. I would install a perment fence with an electric wire along the bottom to keep them off the real fence. Just my opinion. I know that there have been people here that have had real problems with the netting type of electric fence when it comes to pigs. I am sure you will get a response or two on the subject.
     
  4. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    I can't comment on the netting as I've never used it but have great success with wire strands powered by a mains unit. My pigs are now so terrified of it that the fence was off at the paddock junction box for 3 weeks before anybody realised it and there wasn't one escapee.

    However, I would have to agree with John. My pig fences are internal and if they did escape any damage would be confined to within the farm. I definately would not rely on electric for a road boundary fence, not only for pigs but for any stock. As a matter of interest, all boundary fences in this country, by law must be a minimum of 6 wire, post and batten.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  5. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    New Zealand Fence laws must have been written by city slickers, or maybe they are holding sheep.

    Where I have barbed wire I use 5-wire, 20 foot post spacing, two stays between posts. However, I have one whole side of my place fenced with two strands of electric fence. In ten years I have never had an animal cross the electric fence. I did have a newborn calf crawl thru the barbed wire to hide in the fencerow. He fell down a bluff so that he could not get back and I had to go help him when a neighbor told me of it.

    It is true that cattle, once bitten by electric fencing, will stay away from it for weeks after the power is lost.

    I think it is also true that if they were starving all the power in the world would not keep them from trying the fence.
    Ox
     
  6. .netDude

    .netDude Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reply's.
     
  7. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Ox, when NZ fencing laws were written we were a country of less than 1 million people so city slickers wouldn't have had much to do with it. And yes, they would definately have been written with the view of holding our then 77 million sheep off the roads. We are now a country of 4 million people and 40 million sheep but the same criteria applies. Electric fencing is wonderful - until the power goes off. 6 wire, post and batten ensures that sheep, cattle, pigs stay where they're put which is off the road and off the neighbours. It's expensive to install but will still be there doing the job is was intended for in 40 years time. The cost of a car hitting a wandering cow, sheep or pig on the road makes it a very cheap option in my opinion.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  8. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Ronnie is your 6 wire, post and Batten smooth wire or barb?
    How far apart are the posts? Are there vertical wires as well as horizontal?
    If non-electric with all horizontal wires, will it really hold pigs?

    I find it one of History's Grand Jokes that the British Empire took a green, pastoral, lush island with a moderate climate, then used it as a dumping grounds for their "undesirable citizens"- sentencing them to a life of peaceful, pastoral sheepherding - While they stayed in Old England to breathe coal dust, fight world wars, and freeze their butts off during the winter. Vat Vere Dey Tinkin' :shrug: ?
     
  9. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    We have found electro-netting to be very effective with pigs. The only problems occured when:

    1. We had a couple of sows in low 28" fencing and I fed the rest of the herd - they jumped the net. So use the 36" net and all's fine.

    2. A sow got caught in a narrow alley between a stranded fence and an electronet fence. She ended up backing up into the strand and then charging straight through the electronet tearing a hole in it that I had to sew up with polywire. My fault. Make the alley wider so she can turn easily (8').

    3. A low status gilt got thrown into the net by the herd matron. Too many pigs with differences in too small a space. It was temporary. Avoid the situation.

    The electro-netting works really well if you avoid the above problems. Some other tips are:

    1. Clip the bottom two strands at the end posts so they don't get grounded out.

    2. Secure the bottom string between the posts so that piglets don't nose under.

    3. Keep it electrified at all times unless you have a good reason to turn it off (opening it).

    4. Use a large insulated alligator clip to attach it to the charger for easy on/off.

    Cheers,

    -Walter
    Sugar Mountain Farm
    in Vermont
     
  10. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Sorry Up North, I've just seen your post.

    We use very little barbed wire anymore - it is expensive and can cause a lot of damage - but there are still fences around that will have a barbed wire at the top and another on the 2nd or 3rd wire from the ground.

    The fence is built to the contour of the land so on hilly country (and we have a lot of that) the spacing can vary but on average the posts are around 9ft apart. The number of wires can also vary but most fences are between 5 and 8 wire depending on what stock the farmer is running. There are no vertical wires, we use wooden battens which are approximately 2" x 2" and these are stapled to the wires. These add strength to the fence and effectively stop sheep and cattle pushing their heads through to eat what they consider to be the greener grass on the other side.

    Yes, they will stop pigs BUT if the pig is unrung it will dig underneath it and piglets can escape through the eye of a needle, also large pigs use the posts and stays as scratching posts which doesn't do much for the fence. To combat those problems we run an electric wire on outriggers about 10" above the ground and if keeping bulls, another electric wire is run along the top of the fence to stop them pushing on them.

    When we bought this farm some of it was post and batten (conventional fencing) the rest was in electric. We are slowly in the process of getting rid of all the electric and replacing it with conventional with the exception of the Pig Paddock which will remain electric. While the electric is cheaper to install, it is time consuming to maintain and when it collapses it doesn't just affect one fence in one paddock, it can affect half the farm causing huge stock problems and box ups.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  11. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Thanks Ronney..."Pig can escape thru eye of a needle.." Now there's a good VISUAL!..I didn't realize you had hilly terrain,LOL. I'll have to try the batten strips. Most folks stateside are converting to smooth wire as well. When an animal breaches barbwire fence, it tears em up too bad...cheers.
     
  12. Shinsan

    Shinsan Keeping the Dream Alive

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    Hey Ronnie,

    Did you read this at the foot of Up North's post?

    Quote: I find it one of History's Grand Jokes that the British Empire took a green, pastoral, lush island with a moderate climate, then used it as a dumping grounds for their "undesirable citizens"- sentencing them to a life of peaceful, pastoral sheepherding - While they stayed in Old England to breathe coal dust, fight world wars, and freeze their butts off during the winter. Vat Vere Dey Tinkin' ?

    Almost sounds like he might be thinking Oz and N.Z are one country doesn't it? (We often had the same problem when their ships were alonside at HMNZS Philomel in Auckland.)

    LOL - And as we said then: "The trouble with these Canadians is that they don't know their geography!"

    Shin
     
  13. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    The barrier provided by any electric fence, be it tape or net, is "only" psychological. That's pretty strong sometimes and pretty weak at others. When trained to the shock, pigs - intelligent beings they are- will avoid it. But because it is psychological, they can break through it when fear strikes and they panic, or when aggression strikes and they fight, or when curiousity strikes an appeal to the other side and the charge happens to be off... Piglets can easily find ways around two strand tape and can become harder to train so a good jolt becomes necessary. In that way net is better than tape because the piglets won't have the chance of escaping, but in either case, like patarini mentioned, a good jolt will set them straight again. I use two strands of tape and my piglets don't care for the confinement. However they stay where their mother is and she respects the tape. Works for me for now. But won't work in many situations some being when loose dogs are a problem or the road is near.
     
  14. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure what you mean by "electro" netting, but I want to warn you against poultry netting! It does not stop pigs; they push soil up against it, it shorts out and they mow it down. After 3 escapes, I switched to electric tape, which works like a charm and is super easy to install. It even worked when it was off for several days and I didn't know. They understand what it is and will walk over areas where it has been once it's removed, which apparently can be a problem with some electric fencing. Mine are also next to the road and that is their only confinement. I was nervous! But they've been in it 3 months with no escapes. They're 7 months old now.
     
  15. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    Firefly, clip the bottom two leads, or three with bigger pigs, of the netting at the ends. This makes it so the bottom lines don't ground out when the pigs push against them. We use poultry netting mostly for piglets but sometimes for growers. Mostly we use polywire, like the electric tape, or high tensile wire for more permanent fences. But these don't work well for piglets as they slip right through. For the piglets the poultry netting is great.

    How big are your pigs now? Have you weighed or taped them? (See: http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/01/how-to-weigh-pig-with-string.html )

    Cheers,

    -Walter
     
  16. .netDude

    .netDude Well-Known Member

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    yes, I was referring to poultry netting. Thanks for the advice. How did you train them to the tape? Did you have them confined, with tape inside the confinement area, or did you train them by the 'catch and release' method ? ;)
     
  17. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    Walter, I measured them about a month ago and they were something like 160 and 175. Puerco is getting quite chubby now, it won't be long......guess I better make an appointment, huh?

    Dude, I didn't know about the trick Walter mentioned or maybe the netting would have worked. The tape required no training; they touched their noses and that was that. But I've heard they can sometimes run through the tape the first time they touch it, so be forewarned. Also at the time they had a beachball to play with, and the first day one pig was pushing it around and went right under the fence with it protecting his nose. They were originally inside a fenced area while I tested this new system, but once I saw how well it worked sans beachball I moved them to a spot 20' from the road. My only complaint is they have not rooted up the stumps I put them there to root! :grump: