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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have picked up, hauled, and stacked twenty nine hundred feet of one by six shiplap lumber to finish the inside walls of the house I am building. Due to the length of logs they had to work with, my lumber is cut into ten and fourteen foot lengths. Never having built a house before, I have a question. What would be the most efficient way to install this with the least amount of waste? I have two thirty foot walls, and two forty foot walls, ten foot tall. The framing is on twenty four inch centers.
 

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If the siding is a full 6 inches, you will need 2 courses x 10 ft for height. You multiply that by 100 linear feet total, and 2000 sq ft of coverage is the result. If you don't have knots or other factors, they say allow 10% for wastage, although personally I buy 20% to be safe.

I would apply it the same way you install laminate flooring. You go left to right, and at the end of the course, after you cut a full board to finish the course, you use the remnant from the cut to start the next course. That helps you stagger your joints with the least wastage.
 

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I would cut some 10’ers into 5‘ then start with a 14 then 10 then 5 ‘
and repeat
when you get to the end of the wall you use the cut offs to start the next row
but you have to see how many boards you have of each size .
maybe you can start like stated above then use 14’ in the first 3 rows and then 10 ‘ in the next 3 and so on .
Or you can just hammer it up ? just Start with your cut No matter what .
If you come up short on a beam jut glue a scrap on the back and nail it To piece it together.
 

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If it's going to be the finished surface on inside of walls, I'd put something behind it, otherwise you will have gaps at the joints where air can draft thru, bugs, etc.
I'd probably first sheath the walls with OSB, then run the 1x6's vertically. With the OSB behind it, you can get a nail anywhere, so you could do it with virtually no waste, allowing butt joints occur wherever they fall. Would probably put a little construction adhesive on back of each piece before install and shoot them in place with a trim nailer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the info. Any tips on putting in electrical outlets.
 

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I like the osb idea allso , I just like to have a repeating pattern on the wall , I was assuming the walls have insulation and vapor barrier .
It hard for me to use osb the stuff is 47 bucks a sheet here now , they are robbing us blind
I just messer the out let’s and cut with a jig saw or Multimaster it gos easy .
Just make sure you can get the screws in the holes for the outlet .
I unscrew the outlet and tape around the sides with a few wraps of electric tape and pull the outlet out so it’s easy to work .
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Drill bit and saber saw For the ones in middle of board, skill saw and Sabre saw for those on the edge.
They are all next to a stud. I traced around the jct box, drilled 1/4 in holes in opposing corners, and cut it out with a jig saw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I like the osb idea allso , I just like to have a repeating pattern on the wall , I was assuming the walls have insulation and vapor barrier .
It hard for me to use osb the stuff is 47 bucks a sheet here now , they are robbing us blind
I just messer the out let’s and cut with a jig saw or Multimaster it gos easy .
Just make sure you can get the screws in the holes for the outlet .
I unscrew the outlet and tape around the sides with a few wraps of electric tape and pull the outlet out so it’s easy to work .
I started with a metal building. Steel frame, covered with sheet metal. Sprayed the interior with one inch of closed cell foam, the only vents are at the peak of the roof at both ends. Framed the inside with lumber, pulled the electrical wire, installed six inches of fiberglass insulation, cover with 1x6 shiplap. This winter before I put up the fiberglass, I fired up the wood stove and heated it up to 80F, it was 20F outside. I walked around inside with no shirt on, could not feel a draft anywhere.
 

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I like the osb idea allso , I just like to have a repeating pattern on the wall , I was assuming the walls have insulation and vapor barrier .
It hard for me to use osb the stuff is 47 bucks a sheet here now , they are robbing us blind
I just messer the out let’s and cut with a jig saw or Multimaster it gos easy .
Just make sure you can get the screws in the holes for the outlet .
I unscrew the outlet and tape around the sides with a few wraps of electric tape and pull the outlet out so it’s easy to work .
$103 here for osb
 

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I just checked our local price, 38 per sheet on 7/16 4x8, 42 per sheet on 23/32 4x8 tongue and groove. Mighty proud of their wood chips if ya ask me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Do you have a inside vapor barrier ?
The closed cell foam is the vapor barrier. And I heat with wood, which dries everything out extremely well. I could make Biltong in my living room.
 

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Hmmmmm , I’m not sure if that works , im not a spray foam guy .
But in my world the VB always gos on the inside .
The house breaths draws air in and out of the house thru small holes .
Insulation that has the VB on the cold side rots the wood .
Like a floor always gets VB to the heated area and every one just staples it up from the bottom
I replace a lot of floor systems . I’m not a expert on spray foam .
 

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Yup it seams fine to not use a VB on the inside .
I would sure want some thing over the glass insulation
I would think the glass fibers would be blowing thru the house for ever , it’s making me itchy
thinking about it .
Maybe some dry wall under the wood ??? Not that I’m trying to cost you extra money,
but at least dry wall is not double or triple the price today.
You can glue the ends so there is no worry about wast you could use every piece of the panel board .
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Maybe some dry wall under the wood ???
Drywall is waste paper held together with chemicals. I would live in a tent in a swamp before I would live in a house with drywall. Once it has dried the close cell foam is supposed to be inert. If the shiplap is put up nice and tight, you would have to chop a hole in it to get the fiberglass to blow around. And if a little of the fiberglass gets in and blows around, I'll just have to tough it out for the few years I have left.

The house breaths draws air in and out of the house thru small holes
If I put the foam in right, there shouldn't be any small holes. When the foam dries it makes a air tight seal.
 
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