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SM Entrepreneuraholic
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We all understand, at least to some degree, the potential health disaster that Ebola might cause in the US.

But what about the economic disaster? The talking heads are blaming the current drop in the stock market at least partially on Ebola, but there really hasn't been much, if any, financial impact yet. What if the Director-General of WHO is right?

MANILA, Philippines (AP) -- The World Health Organization called the Ebola outbreak "the most severe, acute health emergency seen in modern times" on Monday but also said that economic disruptions can be curbed if people are adequately informed to prevent irrational moves to dodge infection.
"We are seeing, right now, how this virus can disrupt economies and societies around the world," she said, but added that adequately educating the public was a "good defense strategy" and would allow governments to prevent economic disruptions. AP
What she was talking about is keeping borders open to ensure that trade continues even during an Ebola outbreak. This explains the illogical statements made by our own CDC regarding not closing our border to Ebola countries. It is not trade with these 3 countries they are worried about, but a shutdown of worldwide trade sending our fragile worldwide economy into a nosedive.

So there are 2 components to Ebola: health and economic. Everyone is talking about the health aspect while ignoring the economic impact.

Now to play conspiracy nut.

Let's say the worst happens and the US is hit pretty hard with Ebola and we suffer a severe economic downturn.

Now, what would happen if a country, like N Korea, thought this was a good time to bring down our grid? Or how about a terrorist attack of the magnitude of 911?

Are you prepared for a disaster which includes a combination of medical, economic, and grid failure/terrorist attack?

Grid failure is the one that worries me the most - mainly for refrigeration. I have enough food for several months, but I'm largely dependent on refrigerator/freezer.
 

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There is that as well, I was responding to the freezer issue. For us, we'd run the genny and then pressure can what we could before it went bad. We have 3 freezers.

And I wasn't being snide...my first thought was how to save all the frozen goods.

Could we manage without the grid? Probably. Yeah, will run out of fuel, stores won't be open, no electricity, phone or net...wouldn't be fun, but doable. Heat and cook with wood, etc.

Whether ebola, grid failure, economic collapse, EMP, snow storm...the way we live and have prepped ourselves, I figure we'd be okay for quite some time.

I would prefer to not prove that, however...LOL!

Matt
 

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The current economy is almost completely reliant on you spending your paycheck just as fast as you possibly can.

Any disruption in the flow of money out of your pocket and back to the bankers and plutocrats will cause "problems in the economy".

Those are their problems, not mine, and if they are yours then you seriously need to reevaluate your lifestyle.
 

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SM Entrepreneuraholic
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Discussion Starter #7
The current economy is almost completely reliant on you spending your paycheck just as fast as you possibly can.

Any disruption in the flow of money out of your pocket and back to the bankers and plutocrats will cause "problems in the economy".

Those are their problems, not mine, and if they are yours then you seriously need to reevaluate your lifestyle.
Just thinking about what it means to be prepared. When I owned my business, I developed a strategy that said I needed to be able to withstand 3 bad things happening over a fairly short period of time. Three bad things did happen (Internet Bubble, 911, and largest customer began laying off IT workers) during a short time span. My company survived while most of my competitors went bankrupt.

So I'm thinking the same probably should apply for personal survival. Plan for the possibility of 3 disasters happening in a short time period where you don't have time to regroup or resupply between them.

How many people who think they are prepared could handle multiple crises that happen almost concurrently? A health crisis and a financial crisis plus some additional crisis is probably more than most have prepared for.

This winter looks like it is going to be a rough one plus there is Ebola and the economy. We know at some point the grid is likely to fail either under its own weight or by hackers bringing it down. Same with terrorism. The likelihood is that there will be another large scale terrorist attack in the near future. Plus as Rumsfield said, there are the unknown unknowns.

If we get hit with disaster after disaster after disaster, how many of us are prepared?
 

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If a true pandemic happens in the US, it will have a domino effect with multiple crises to follow. It wouldn't surprise me at all if this nation's enemies used the opportunity to hit us. I'm not truly ready for 1 major disaster, much less 3, but I do what little I can do prepare as time and cash allows. Above that, I will just trust in God.
 

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If we get nuked by N. Korea, invaded by China, and then get hit by another ice age, I don't think I could make it... other than that, I'm good..

now seriously.. If we get hit by ebola, it will tank the economy, then I won't be able to pay my electric bill..

I can make it for a decently long time without electric but it would also depend on whats happening in my surroundings. If I can't go outside to hunt, fish, farm, garden... I'm limited to my stores.. if it's to where I can do most of those, I could live for years..
 

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If we get nuked by N. Korea, invaded by China, and then get hit by another ice age, I don't think I could make it... other than that, I'm good..
KC - you were being a little facetious when you wrote that I think. I don't think the US being nuked or invaded is likely. When I said that a pandemic would give our enemies opportunity to hit us, I was thinking more of a terrorist attack by a group like ISIS, and the result of the economy taking a nose dive would be the 3rd hit. The news networks are having a hard time keeping up with reporting on Ebola, what is going on in Iraq, and the stock market, I don't think that scenario is that far-fetched.
 

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KC - you were being a little facetious when you wrote that I think. I don't think the US being nuked or invaded is likely. When I said that a pandemic would give our enemies opportunity to hit us, I was thinking more of a terrorist attack by a group like ISIS, and the result of the economy taking a nose dive would be the 3rd hit. The news networks are having a hard time keeping up with reporting on Ebola, what is going on in Iraq, and the stock market, I don't think that scenario is that far-fetched.
I think you missed my very next sentence after the one you quoted.. I was being VERY sarcastic... and the rest of that sentence you didn't quote states I would agree..
 

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I think you missed my very next sentence after the one you quoted.. I was being VERY sarcastic... and the rest of that sentence you didn't quote states I would agree..
My apologies. I misunderstood what you were saying
 

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Rather than trying to keep freezers alive in a grid down situation how about looking at how to avoid using them in the first place. I have become a big fan of dehydrating. It takes much less space to store and does not require refrigeration. Of course not everything tastes great dehydrated, but there is more than you might think that does.

Small animals are better than big ones. Rabbits, chickens and a well stocked pond make the most sense for meat animals. Butcher one and it is a meal or two rather than a huge amount of meat that has to be preserved. It is not difficult to produce feed for these critters on the homestead. They do not require a large amount of space. Without a rooster it is not likely that anyone would know you even have them. Hard to hide a cow, goats or sheep.

I have some solar. Certainly enough to provide lights, recharge my kindle and cell phone and a small 12 volt fan. I'm not even going to attempt to set up enough solar to run appliances. My biggest concern is cooling in the summer. One of my preps is misprinted rice bags. If I needed to I could dig into the side of a hill, build earthbag walls and backfill. That would give me a cool place to rest in the heat of the day. Staying warm is fairly simple if you have access to wood.

Most of us do not extend the growing season to it's limits. A combination of dried stores like beans and rice, foraging and raising to the full potential of your growing zone should be sufficient. For those of you in the far north you might consider putting by a supply of seeds for sprouting.

Best defense against the economy going pear shaped......have no debt.....and have homesteading skills. A country girl can survive ;)
 

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I've been dehydrating fruit, and I soaked some black beans and canned them. Had some leftovers (I'm terrible at estimating how much dried beans = cooked/plumped beans) and thought I'd just dehydrate them. I did that… but then I tested them to see how long it took to get them edible, and how much water it took. For two cups of beans, it took eight cups of water, three hours of cooking. So I'm scrapping the dehydration plan for beans, and will go back to my canning. Same thing with potatoes. I got 20 pounds for $5 the other day, and I was going to slice them and dehydrate, but seeing how much water and time/energy it took for the beans, I think I'll can them, too.

And I'm going through my freezer, getting ready to can as much of the meat as I can manage. This will be my first time canning meat, but I would rather try it now when we're not in an urgent situation than wait and lose all the food.

My biggest concern after that is staying warm (we're working on the woodstove and getting wood for it), and keeping water in the house. We have city water, three wells, two tiny streams, and a creek. Our plan for now is to do a hand pump of some kind for the shallowest well, and as soon as we can, we'll get a solar setup for another.

I feel like I'm rushing against time and it's running out fast. I've felt for a while now that we were going to have a hard, bad winter, and on top of this whole ebola mess, I'm really dreading the next few months. We're doing everything we can to prepare, to find out any holes we have in our plans, but I'm scared we'll miss something. It helps to know we aren't the only ones worried about this. Thank God for this forum.
 

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Rather than trying to keep freezers alive in a grid down situation how about looking at how to avoid using them in the first place. I have become a big fan of dehydrating. It takes much less space to store and does not require refrigeration. Of course not everything tastes great dehydrated, but there is more than you might think that does.

Small animals are better than big ones. Rabbits, chickens and a well stocked pond make the most sense for meat animals. Butcher one and it is a meal or two rather than a huge amount of meat that has to be preserved. It is not difficult to produce feed for these critters on the homestead. They do not require a large amount of space. Without a rooster it is not likely that anyone would know you even have them. Hard to hide a cow, goats or sheep.

I have some solar. Certainly enough to provide lights, recharge my kindle and cell phone and a small 12 volt fan. I'm not even going to attempt to set up enough solar to run appliances. My biggest concern is cooling in the summer. One of my preps is misprinted rice bags. If I needed to I could dig into the side of a hill, build earthbag walls and backfill. That would give me a cool place to rest in the heat of the day. Staying warm is fairly simple if you have access to wood.

Most of us do not extend the growing season to it's limits. A combination of dried stores like beans and rice, foraging and raising to the full potential of your growing zone should be sufficient. For those of you in the far north you might consider putting by a supply of seeds for sprouting.

Best defense against the economy going pear shaped......have no debt.....and have homesteading skills. A country girl can survive ;)
Freezers play a huge role because of the scale in which we grow our food. of course not everyone would have 40 quart bags of greens or corn in any given day, but we do. When the garden starts producing, we are also stocking up on fish, mushrooms, and a lot of wild berries and so on.. This makes our time very valuable through the spring and early summer months so we have to process it as fast as we can.

Dehydrators have their place, but the fact that they are limited to what one can process in a given time is their down fall. One thing we do is dry apples, gin sing, yellow root, and numerous other things in the windshields and back glasses of cars in the summer months.. Our herbs get dried in the kitchen windows.

We raise both big and small animals but again on a larger scale than most. Beef is my lively hood, my soul income, and is produced on our 140 acre farm. Instead of raising a dozen chickens, I hatch hundreds at a time because it takes the same amount of time to fill the feeders and water troughs for a dozen or a couple hundred.. If one chooses the breed of chickens wisely and the location allows (like mine does) after the first few weeks, they can be free ranged with little feed input required.

One thing I'd like to point out is, without a rooster, your supply of chickens isn't sustainable but I'm sure you already know this...
 

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Grid down will just compound this Ebola problem . . . . Big time.

Few folks realize the amount of electric that these horse-bitles use up . . .
Of course they have very big diesel back-up . . . . . . But what happens when those BIG generators have used up all the stored fuel . . . . .And none is available.....???
 

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Partial quote:

This winter looks like it is going to be a rough one plus there is Ebola and the economy.
I wonder what cold, below freezing for days or weeks, weather will do to the survival ability of Ebola?
 

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I'm late to this conversation but want to add to the comments about what ebola can do to our economy.

One reason the gov doesn't want to stop air travel is the fact that the US Dept of State is contracting with various NGOs to bring in refugees from other countries, W Africa being one of those, to the US for temporary or extended settlement.

The first thing that's issued to these refugees is a SS card and that allows the federal reserve to print money. It's speculated that one new SS card allows the feds to print as much as $30 billion.

I'd say that's probably some of the incentive to not close US borders. The fact that they use poor children to get the sympathy vote/dollars is what really is underhanded and cruel.

The feds use the money to keep the high profile bankers and gamblers in business and the money is never seen by the public, yet it's tacked onto the trillions of dollars in debt that's handed back to the American taxpayers.

In any world system you only have to look at the most innocent to find the greatest evil lurking in the shadows and manipulating all to their advantage. Same with the ebola plague and the evil will use the death to increase their own power.
 
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