Eating Nubians?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by KodiakFox, Sep 5, 2017.

  1. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    Hello! I'm new to the forums. I joined because I have a Nubian doeling that is very whiny, and is driving me nuts. I know convention is to eat the boys, but I have put her up for sale and so far no bites (lol). So I'm planning to just butcher her. I am new to goats, just got my first goats this year. I have been reading about when to do it. She seems very small still. She was kidded in April. I've attached some photos. Advice? I don't know how much she weighs, but she is small, I can still carry her around fairly easily. Maybe 40lb?
     

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  2. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Just process her and don't worry about it. You get what you get. Huggs.
     

  3. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    That will happen probably next month if nobody wants her for breeding. Nubians are naturally smaller, as I understand it? She just seems kind of scrawny lol They have minerals and salt, separate and loose, as well as access to the big horse salt/mineral block, access to hay all the time and frequent access to a big field with lots of browsing. I guess she is almost 5 months old now.
     
  4. Oregon1986

    Oregon1986 Well-Known Member

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    If you were in Oregon I'd take her,pretty girl
     
  5. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    She is pretty, I hope somebody buys her! I am only an hour north of the WA border, not sure what is involved in bringing goats across
     
  6. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Welcome!

    Full size breeds should be growing a minimum of 10lbs per month on top of birth weight. Nubians shouldn't be 'smaller', though variation does exist within a breed. Alpines, Saanens, and Nubians all have the same minimum sizes per standard - 30" tall and 135lbs at maturity. Toggenburgs are generally the smallest standard breed. But usually, all the standard size breeds are considered 'full size'. (IE, all dairy breeds except for Nigierans and Miniatures are considerd standard sized). For growth assessment, An 8lb kid at birth should be 18lbs at 1 month, 28lbs at 2 months etc. This puts a doeling on track to be breeding size of about 80lbs by about 7-8 months of age. If she was born in April, she is 4-5 months of age and should be around 50ish pounds to be on track. The MAIN reason for slower growth is usually a combination of parasites and limited energy intake after weaning (or during milk feeding if using a starvation ration especially as suggested by some replacers). If you kids aren't growing at an appropriate rate, look to feed management and especially parasite management. Kids do not have to be blatantly sickly or having diarrhea to be stunted severely by coccidia and GI worms. :) It's extremely common and something to consider when moving forward in your breeding program as runty doelings may not ever be breeding size or take forever to be bred safely. :)

    As for butchering them - you sure can. Doelings that don't sell and don't fit your breeding needs or for example, if they have defects, are just as tasty as wethers. Not all females born are worthy of breeding or keeping! And that is great that you recognize that. :)
     
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  7. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    Thank you for such a detailed reply! I would say this girl is behind in her growth based off that info. What can I offer her to help her grow? And for parasite control, should I deworm her if I am going to eat her? I may leave that to potential buyers as I may process her within a month if she stays and most drugs have a 30 day meat withdrawal. I got them at 10 weeks, and gave them a bottle a day for another week after that. I then began giving them goat text, but ended up stopping as it made her yelling much worse... I would definitely be interested in an appropriate dewormer for her sister who is staying, and supplement/feed additives I could give her to help her gain weight. Their hay is 50/50 grass alfalfa of good quality. I need to deworm my horse soon so will do everyone at the same time. AFTER I figure out what to do with this whiny doeling Quite frankly I'm not interested in keeping let alone breeding a PIA doe lol

    I will investigate dewormers for goats. The vet will be out on the 30th and may be able to sell me something.

    Feed supplements to help with weight gain? More than a small amount of goat text was making their poo clump into one big ball... a small amount being maybe 1/2 cup.






     
  8. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Supplements are unnecessary IMO. A balanced adequate diet with enough energy for growth should be all that's needed. Here, we creep feed an 18% lamb grower to young stock. We then ration them at about a pound - 1.5lb per head as a kid until they are confirmed bred their first fall. Free choice quality hay is of course the main portion of their diet.

    I only suggest deworming if necessary dependent upon your management and parasite load. Depending on if you dam raise or bottle raise, and your pasture management for the most part. Misuse of dewormers will contribute very rapidly to a dewormer resistant population of parasites, which is much, much worse of a situation for your herd. Responsible use of dewormer is exceedingly important. Lots of information in the links posted above, as well - focous on wormx.info for good information. A major stunting factor are coccidia in small ruminants. Coccidia are not the same as 'worms' and require a coccidicide or coccidistat for management. These I *do* prevent routinely, unlike worms. We begin coccidia preventative at 3 weeks and repeat until 'well grown'. We do use a mediated feed, but odn't rely on it until they are several months old for any level of control. We also routinely test fecals for parasites (mid-america ag research for affordable sampling) and treat as necessary unless several clinical signs are conclusive with parasite problems and/or fecal loads are very high.
     
  9. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    I use two vets. My "local" vet I only use for things I have no choice about, like coming to my place to do a float on my horse etc. For drugs and other things, including fecals, I use a different vet that is farhter away. Luckily I will be there in october! So I will simply run fecals on everybody and they will despense me what I need :)

    So when you say you give lamb grower, that is a pellet or bagged feed correct? So in addition to hay, should I look for something similar? I'm in BC Canada and tend to not have access to as many types of feeds. But if I know the basics I can get something similar. Bagged feed is what I meant by supplement - supplementing additional to hay. Right now they JUST have hay, with free choice minerals and salts. And pasture.

    Thanks for your time!



     
  10. motdaugrnds

    motdaugrnds II Corinthians 5:7 Supporter

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    I've raised Nubians since 1996, selling some and eating some. The ones I'm going to slaughter I pen up for 1-2 months and supplement their feed more than I do even my milkers. That is I give them (1) alfalfa "pellets", (2) "shreaded" beet pulp and (3) "cracked" corn TWICE a day while they're penned. They have high quality orchard grass ALL THE TIME and, of course, "fresh" water daily. I do this for a very practical reason, i.e. when an animal starts "gaining" weight, the meat tenderizes itself; and this makes for some great tender meat for the family. (If an animal is "losing" weight, the meat will be tough. When an animal stays the same weight, it "can" be tough.)

    Since you're letting that doe range with the rest of the herd, you might simply feed her ALONE in the morning and again in the evening to get her to start putting on weight.

    I usually wait until my goats are around 8 months old (or older) to slaughter them.
     
  11. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    Ok thanks! She is the noisiest when penned so may just give her her treats separate and then let her out. How much of the alfalfa/beet pulp/cracked corn do you start with, and end up giving? I noticed soft poops if she got more than about 1/4 cup goat text. And if she stays (and I process her) I do want to do it when it's colder so that will put us in good shape for around 8 months.

    Thank you,




     
  12. motdaugrnds

    motdaugrnds II Corinthians 5:7 Supporter

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    I don't know what "goat text" is; and it might have molasses in it, which could contribute to "soft poops". (She may also be browsing on clover or wet grasses, both will cause such problems.)

    Since she kidded last April, this will give you plenty of time to go slowly in putting weight on her. Yes slaughtering goats in cool/cold weather is the best. Since she's never had the alfalfa pellets, cracked corn and/or shredded beets, were I in your shoes, I would only give her about fourth a cup of each daily for a "few" (1-3) days to let her body get use to it. Neither should give her the runs... If she does ok with this amount, then I would increase to a half cup of each once a day for another few days. If she does well with this, I'ld give her a full cup of each TWICE a day (morning/evening) until a good 24 hours prior to slaughtering day. (Slaughtering "day" she should only be getting fresh water...no food.)

    What you're doing is simply getting her to START gaining weight enough so you will notice it. [I've at times overfed my slaughter goats and the only thing this does is put extra "fat" on them. (It has never given them the runs.) This fat can be used when "grinding" the goat meat. I often leave much of the fat on the "marrow bones" as well as the ribs, hocks & necks to feed to my dogs as they get "raw" meat as often as I have it.]
     
  13. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    Awesome, I will do that! Yes goat text is a pellet, mixed with some sort of a grain and molassas. I will do as you advised, those things are all affordable around here and I soak for my horse already. I also use everything I can and feed my dog raw bones and chicken feet. I do meat birds so I am looking forward to having red meat off the farm too!

    Thank you for the advise :)




     
  14. motdaugrnds

    motdaugrnds II Corinthians 5:7 Supporter

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    LOL I got tired of only having red meat (goats, an occasional lamb and deer); so I started raising "Jumbo Cornish X-cross" birds. I kept them in the brooder and adjacent pen for a full 3 months, a lot longer than usual; and when I slaughtered them, it was awesome at the amount of meat they gave me... :)
     
  15. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    I grow the cornish birds as well as some heritage meat birds, mistral gris and western rustics. If either are available to you I highly recommend them! Variety is the spice of life lol

    H

     
  16. motdaugrnds

    motdaugrnds II Corinthians 5:7 Supporter

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    Never heard of mistral gris or western rustics. Why do you like those; and where do you get yours?
     
  17. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    I live in BC Canada. The mistrals are actually patended and can only be purchased from true north farm near Vancouver. The Western Rustics I buy from Rochester hatchery in alberta. I think you can bring chickens across the border for a vetting fee if you live in the states.




     
  18. TracyCrabtree

    TracyCrabtree Active Member

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    Id take her.. but i'm in Ohio.. how much is shipping? lol
     
  19. KodiakFox

    KodiakFox Member

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    Haha! However much it costs for you to drive over and get her lol! I think goats need zoology reports to skip the line



     
  20. boerboy

    boerboy Beginner Part-time Farmer

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