Eating bucks

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Jeremy in KY, Apr 9, 2006.

  1. Jeremy in KY

    Jeremy in KY New Member

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    I'm pretty new to rabbits and thought you all might answer this for me. I have a buck that about a year old that really needs to go. Is there any reason not to eat an adult buck and what would be a good way to cook him. The wife is taking some convincing on rabbit meat so I want the first one I fix her to be a good one.

    The reason I ask is the wife and I had a bad experience butchering an intact boar hog (the smell that came out of the lard was horrible had to feed the whole thing to the cats).
     
  2. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Fortunately a boar hog and a buck rabbit are not much alike. I know of no reason why the meat should not be perfectly fine. After all, people eating wild rabbit do not worry whether it is a buck or doe. I certainly intend to eat any bucks that "have to go."

    Because it is a mature rabbit, the meat may not be quite as fork-tender as a fryer would be. It won't be excessively tough either, but you may want to cook it long, slow and moist rather than frying. A lovely rabbit stew or rabbit pie might be a good bet. A slow cooker is good for cooking older rabbits, with a little apple juice or wine for moisture and lots of herbs, spices, mushrooms, onions and carrots.

    Why not check out the recipe sticky? I have a recipe there for rabbit soup that will give you some ideas about seasonings. There is also one for bacon-wrapped roast rabbit that is dead easy and very tasty. Lots of other great ideas from other people too.



    Your other alternative is to put the buck in the freezer for later and make your first wife's first experience of eating rabbit a young fryer. But to tell you the truth I'd rather eat a roaster any day.
     

  3. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    sence its not a common practice to castrate rabbits its fine to eat a buck that is intact, the only thing to watch for sence it is an older rabbit is that older animals do not have as tender of meat as the young butchering age rabbits do, so you may have to prepair it differint to help keep it tender
     
  4. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    Cooking an older animal in moist, low heat (roasting, stewing, etc.) is definitely the way to go. Fryers are more tender, but personally, I like the richer flavor of an older animal. :) And yeah, there's some good recipes on the recipe thread!
     
  5. cedargrove

    cedargrove Well-Known Member

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    This last Sunday I BBQ'd a Doe that just never produced well, and she was over 1 year old. TAISTED GREAT and all I did was age her in the refrig for 7 days. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM GOOD
     
  6. Jeremy in KY

    Jeremy in KY New Member

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    Thanks for all the replies. I believe I'll make a pot pie out of him.