easiest way to plant taters?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by BlessedMom, May 20, 2005.

  1. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    343
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    Anyone have any advice on how to grow red potatoes and reg. white potatoes?
    I'm in the Pacific NW...lots and lots and lots of rain right now.
    When should I plant? Where should I plant them?
    Should I plant them strait in the ground, or in a bucket, etc??
    I tried to plant them in tires one year..that was a flop.
    I really need these potatoes this year!

    Thanks,
    Lori
     
  2. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    Here's what I do every year, and every year I have potatoes coming out of my ears. (I think I'm north of you, right on the Canadian border)

    1) I cut up the potatoes in pieces, making sure each piece has at least one eye. (I usually get between 4 and 6 peices to plant per spud)

    2) I make a long mound of dirt.

    3) I plant the potato pieces about 3 inches deep.

    The plants will take off and making the mounds makes it easy to excavate the taters in the fall (and easy to reach in and grab a couple new ones for barbeques in the summer).

    I plant mine in full sun. I'm actually planting them in the next couple of days. I tried getting them in the ground a month ago, but we had a frost that got them so I have to re-plant.
     

  3. BlessedMom

    BlessedMom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    343
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    Thanks!
    Do you do anything to them? Do you use regular eating potatoes? Or do you go to the nursery and buy the special kind? We have tons of slugs here.
    Believe it or not, we get more rain than Seattle! I would have never believed it, someone forgot to tell me that before we moved here. :bash:

    We are a family of 6 (and usually feed more than that) 3 are big and busy teens. So they pack away A LOT of potatoes!

    I hope I can get the potatoes to come out my ears too!!

    When do you harvest?

    Last weekend I planted carrots, radishes, peas and acorn squash in the garden. It has rained so hard, that I think they may have washed away. I mean it has literally poured here since then.

    <SIGH>

    Lori
     
  4. puglady

    puglady Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    109
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2002
    Location:
    central IL
    I have heard about planting them in a plastic garbage can, and gradually filling it up with dirt as they grow, to encourage the setting of more potatoes. Has anyone tried it? Does it actually work??
     
  5. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    24,572
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Location:
    MS
    I use regular potatoes I buy at the grocery store. The ones that have already sprouted work best. I cut them up several days before I plant them. This allows the pieces to dry out or "cure" where they've been cut. This will keep them from rotting.
     
  6. busy homestead

    busy homestead Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    83
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    the last couple years and again this year we do the deep mulching with
    our potaotes.

    ruffle up the ground a bit, or not so much, this year I actually planted right
    on the unruffled ground which was hard and brome grass with weeds.
    Anyway lay the tators on the ground and cover with a min. of 6 inches of
    mulch. We use brome hay at our house because thats what we have.
    I also use hay waste from the animals.
    Lots and lots of mulch.
    this summer and fall when you want tators just pull back the mulch and
    rob what you want and then replace the mulch. they will keep growing
    and growing.

    works great for us, last year we had nurf football sized potatoes and that
    was after all the robbing I did threw the summer!

    Christina
    athome in South Dakota
     
  7. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    415
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2002
    Location:
    Rocky Topo
    Howdy
    After you cut them sprinkle the cut areas with sulfer and then give the 2 or 3 days of drying. The sulfer acts as a fungicide and adds additional insurance in the rot department.
     
  8. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,314
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Location:
    TX

    I'm trying it this year. So far I lost one can, I think it got too soggy, but the other two are full to the top with leaves and the plants are flowering, so I should know how it worked out pretty soon. If it does work, I'm going to do it all of the time, because it takes up much less space that way.

    The mulch method is in the Lasagna garden book and I tried one bed of that as well, but for some reason they didn't take off? But it's not the method itself, I probably didn't keep the mulch wet enough, hard to do in Texas, and I definitely didn't have more than a few inches. I was going to add to it as they sprouted, but like I say, it probably got hot too fast for them. The mulched bed method is really nice and easy, though, I'm doing all new beds that way, I really like it a lot!

    Oh Yeah! I wanted to add that you don't have to fill the can with dirt, it gets really heavy. You just need good soil in the bottom, and then the rest can be mulch materials. We used some hay, but leaves were easier to pour into the cans without smooshing the plants, so I mostly used that.

    hollym
     
  9. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    I use plain old regular potatoes from the store. I try to get the organic ones, because some of the regular taters are treated to prevent them from sprouting.

    As the nights get colder, around September, you'll see the plants start to slow down. That's when I go through with a garden fork and harvest them.

    The slugs seem to leave my taters, eggplant, and tomatoes alone. I think the lettuce keeps them too full to notice the other plants.

    I just got my squash in. Today I'm planting the peas, beans, carrots, and cucumbers. Tomorrow I'll re-plant the taters. The cucumbers and squash are from starts, so they should get off to a fast start.