Easiest/Cheapest Garden Fence?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Peacock, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    I hope you don't think this is a dumb question... :rolleyes:

    I need suggestions for a fairly easy, cheap, yet not totally ugly fence to keep my two large dogs (GSD and Lab) out of the garden. I don't *think* it has to be very tall, 3' might do, as long as the ornery creatures are able to recognize it for what it is. :) They don't hop over the baby gates we put up in the house to keep them out of the kids' rooms, though they certainly could, so probably they won't need anything major.

    But they've already proven they don't care much for keeping out of unfenced garden beds; they're poo-ing in my strawberries and asparagus. UGH! :grump:

    At our old house we used the basic t-post and green wire mesh fencing setup. It was put in to keep out rabbits, which it didn't do, but it did keep the dog out (we only had one, then) But I suspect there may be a cheaper method, which would be great, because I'll have a much larger area to surround here. Don't know how big yet -- at least 40x40.

    Thanks!
     
  2. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Have you checked on cattle panels? sixteen foot long--run about 12--14 each, and need 3 posts for first panel-quick, and moveable
     

  3. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    single strand electric, borrow the charger it only needs to be hotfor a week or so
     
  4. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    A single strand might do it depending on the individual animals and their motivation to go past the fence. If they were chasing a rabbit, etc I doubt that they would even notice it. It certainly would not have held my Husky... My Pyr's a bit calmer and respects the electric fence religiously. I'd put 3-4 strands up and keep it charged for your dogs, strays, coons, 'possums, etc....
     
  5. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i use that stretchy temporary electric fencing. it even keeps the chickens out.
     
  6. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    That would be my choice too.
     
  7. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    Labs don't tend to respond well to the "invisible fencing" because the slight shock doesn't bother them much, so I'm not sure if the electrified fence would, either. My GSD is a little smarter than the big dummy Lab, but who knows?

    No need for protection against deer or other animals -- the whole back 3/4 acre or so is already fenced with 6' chain link and the dogs keep the smaller critters away.
     
  8. bostonlesley

    bostonlesley Guest

    The cheapest is a pallet fence..because in many areas, pallets can be had absolutely free. A visit to any loading dock will find pallets being torn up and tossed into dumpsters. Why not simply arrange with the business owner to take them off his hands? Do a "google" search as I just did and you'll find under "pallet fence" free and simple plans for a pallet garden fence.

    The hard part is taking out the nails, but hey, what do you want for free wood? LOL..After a few coats of stain, or paint you have a nice looking garden fence that cost you nothing but what you paid for the new nails, a few corner posts and paint. :)
     
  9. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    I assure you that a properly constructed and powered electric fence will keep even the dumbest and most persistent of dogs on their own side after the second time they stick their nose on a wire. Third time if they're a real rock. Dogs do not usually 'test' a wire once they've been shocked. Pigs, now...
     
  10. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Now that my dogs have learned about electric fences, I can now fence them in with masonary twine. They refuse to touch it to find out if its "HOT" LOL. My Coonhound wont cross a piece 6 inches high
     
  11. RedneckPete

    RedneckPete Well-Known Member

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    Labs are probably one of the easiest dogs to train to the invisible fence. Labs completely lack the prey drive that causes a dog to push the limits. I have German Shepherds (a very high prey drive dog) perfectly contained by the invisible fence with super-shocker collars.

    That said, any dog, or human for that matter can learn the electric fence world very easily. Electric fencing is WAY more intense then invisible fencing. A properly working electric fence is far more then a physiological barrier. I've touched mine and had it knock the wind out of me, leaving me dazed and confused as to what the heck just hit me. I couldn't eat my supper two hours later as I was still feeling queasy. Trust me, I won't make that mistake again, neither would your dog.

    Pete
     
  12. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The cheapest fence for me is a waddle fence built with willow, but it sure isn't easy! I'm going to post photos if I ever get it finished.

    We have several dogs...Lab, lab mixes, collie mixes, a Great Pyr mix, a Catahoula and a bulldog/terrier mix. The BDT is the only one we haven't been able to train to stay out of my raised beds. He just loves "tilling" the beds for me!!! :nono:
     
  13. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    If the plastic mesh fence is orange or green and AKA snowfencing, I have found dogs to walk under it. I've found geese to walk under it!
     
  14. Peacock

    Peacock writing some wrongs Supporter

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    YMMV of course but Labs are the only dogs I've known to regularly cross invisible fencing like it was nothing. Sure, they can be trained, but without the training it just doesn't seem to bother them. I routinely had to bring a neighbor's Lab back home in our old neighborhood when it crossed the invisible fence system they swore was functioning properly. :shrug:

    Personally, I wouldn't try the invisible fence thing for my dogs because it's not necessarily the dogs I need to restrain! Two recent threads on CF explain that one, especially Ravenslost. :Bawling: The BIG fence is to keep everything else OUT, not so much to keep the pups IN!

    Now, about the electric fence -- having never experienced one, I wasn't sure how big of a zap they had to offer. If it's as big as you say, Pete, I don't think I want my dear dogs exposed to that -- or my KIDS for that matter! Yikes! I'd rather have my garden plundered than risk a minor electrocution.

    I like the cattle panel idea, but I think my Lab could probably get through one. The GS might be a little too big, but the Lab's a mix and kind of on the small side for a Lab.

    I think I'll just look for a good deal on 3-4' wire mesh and t-posts. Thanks!
     
  15. rzrubek

    rzrubek Flying Z

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    [​IMG]
     
  16. hoofinitnorth

    hoofinitnorth Well-Known Member

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    Good suggestions here. Just want to add that TRAINING (for you and the dogs) will forever solve the problem and cost you nothing but time (and possibly a new collar and leash for proper training sessions).
     
  17. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Hedge is good, but it will take a bit of work. And as Ravenlost mentioned, waddles are VERY nice indeed, and look pretty, too.

    I suppose you could put up a pallet fence, either inside or outside a well-built hedge. Then when the hedge is nicely filled in, you can use the pallets for something else. :)

    Pony!
     
  18. diamondefarm

    diamondefarm Well-Known Member

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    +1
     
  19. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The Cheapest--------I just trained my Pitt Bull to Not go into the garden--he is going on 8 now and Will Not go into the 3/4 acre garden. He will go around it. I have seen him chase a rabbit---and the rabbit went through the garden-------he went around it and continued the chase. Didn't take long to train him. Randy