Dwarf Nigerian Goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Balancedmom2003, May 11, 2004.

  1. Balancedmom2003

    Balancedmom2003 Well-Known Member

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    We are interested in getting Dwarf Nigerian goats as milkers. I was wondering if anyone could recommend any links online for sellers. We live in the central part of NC. I am going to the local ag extension office this week to see if they have any info in our neck of the woods. I did a google but didn't come up with any places near us........ of course I didn't have time to look at all of the pages found by google......... If anyone can give me any links or set me off in the right direction I would definately appreciate it!

    Michele
     
  2. Balancedmom2003

    Balancedmom2003 Well-Known Member

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    Found a few sites on my own.
     

  3. Jaybird

    Jaybird Member

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    I did a little looking into the Nigerian Dwarf recently myself. One of the best resources I found was www.herzingers.com The owner, Gena, was very knowledgable, ships all over the US and her stock is reasonably priced (some breeders seem to be playing on the Niggies "novelty" and charging astronomical prices). When I started to research other breeders, many of them had her stock back in their lines. So why not go to the original source?

    Good luck and enjoy them, they are cuties!

    Jaybird
     

  4. Did you have them shipped and how far did they have to travel? Did they arrive safely etc..... I did check out their site and the prices seem to be reasonable but I would be concerned about the cost of shipping and the health of the goats when they arrived.

    Michele
     
  5. Jaybird

    Jaybird Member

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    I didn't end up buying because for our purposes the ND breed didn't give enough milk...that said, if I had decided to go with the ND, I would definately buy from Herzingers. And we may eventually go with some Nigerians as show animals for our younger 4Hers in the house.

    We live close enough that we could drive to pick up, but I did discuss shipping with Gena. She was very well informed and thorough about shipping and I know she's shipped all over the US and I believe internationally as well. In talking with others who show goats and HAVE bought from her, they are all impressed with her standards. She is at the forefront of ADGA registering and runs a CAE free herd. I also casually know some of the people who show with her and they all had good things to say about her herd.

    A bad reputation can get around like wildfire in the goat show world, so it is really nice when a good reputation gets around too!

    Give her a call or e-mail and talk with her. She was happy to call me back and I really enjoyed our visit. I'm saying all these good things and I've never even met her in person yet, so I'm not prejudice or trying to advertise.

    Good luck and happy hunting!
     
  6. Trisha-MN

    Trisha-MN www.BilriteFarms.com

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    We have had Nigies for several years now. We have them for milk and are just getting into showing some. We find them to be spunky and fun goats that are hardy and easy kidders. As for milk, they do produce a decent amount for their size and the milk is wonderful but we have other breeds that we prefer for milk simply due to less work to get the same amount of milk.

    You might want to check out the American Goat Society (www.americangoatsociety.com) and the Nigerian Dwarf Goat Association (www.ndga.org) for more info on Nigerian Dwarf Goats. There is also a breed club ANDDA (www.andda.org) Goat kingdom also has a list of breeders.


    Different people and groups have different thoughts on what they want from Nigerian Dwarf goats. Some show, some milk, some have them for pets.
    I'd recommend you ask a lot of questions and visit herds before you decide.
    But be prepared - they're cute :)
     
  7. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I have some Nigerians available, please check out my website, www.glimmercroft.com. I still have Bobbie Sox available. She is very nicely put together and should be a good milker. She is polled.

    Also, my doe Chanel kidded with two bucklings by Argyle last night. One is a chamoisee with very little white, and the other is a black buckling with a white belly band. I haven't had a chance to evaluate them for structure yet. Any that are buck quality will be priced at $200. I hope to get a shaved picture of their sire, Argyle, up before too long so folks can see how gorgeous he really is, but check out his pedigree and milking lines. Chanel is a very good milker, giving around 4 pounds per day, with a gorgeous udder. Please let me know if you'd like any further information.
     
  8. mamasaanan

    mamasaanan Well-Known Member

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    Nigerian Drawf goats are cute as they can be but I don't care for them as milk goats. I tried milking one once and couldn't figure out how to get a grip on the teat, if you could call it that. I'm not cut out for milking something I need a magnafing glass and a pair of tweezers to find.
     
  9. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Not to sound too defensive, Mamasaanan, because I've seen the same small teats on Nigerians, but honestly there has been a lot of improvement in how milkable these little goats are. I have certainly seen teats on standard dairy goats that were no larger than the teats on either of my Nigerian does.

    One thing I HAVE found out, in my standard goats and in my Nigerians, is that it really does help to have 12 hours between milkings in early lactation to develop teat size and udder capacity, especially in a first freshener. For myself, I separate the kids at night after the second or third night, and let them stay with mom during the day, whether I'm milking the doe or not. If I'm not milking, the kids get a big breakfast, but the mom still gets the opportunity to develop properly, just like all those standard dairy goats that don't dam raise their kids.

    I find the real differences between the small and large goats are 1) amount of milk - duh! - 2) quality of milk 3) ease of handling - another duh! - and 4) persistence of lactation. 1) I have some outstanding standard dairy goats that are currently drowning me in milk. I'm only milking two of the three, and they're raising their own kids, yet I'm throwing out nearly a gallon of milk a day. What a waste! 2) I've had milk from a lot of different standard goats and NOTHING comes close to Nigerian milk for downright tastiness, but then, I really like rich, sweet milk. I guess someone who prefers less sweetness and butterfat might form a different opinion. 3) It's just natural that a 60 pound goat is a whole lot easier to handle than a 150 pound goat. 4) Persistence of lactation is a biggie for me because I only like to milk once a day. My Obers can maintain a relatively level lactation on that schedule, but the Nigies tend to dry off fairly quickly.

    I'm now breeding minis to try for the persistence of lactation from the standards, along with the ease of handling and delicious milk in more reasonable quantities from the Nigerians. We'll see how it goes.
     
  10. Hi Michelle, I have a wonderful starter herd for you! One blue eyed buck and three does. Beautiful udders and sweet milk! Two have freshened so you can start milking immediately. ~Betty betty022002@hotmail.com

     
  11. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

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    How much milk do NDGs give, compared to the full-sized goats?

    Roomies want a goat... ^_^

    Cait