Dwarf blueberry plants in containers

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by working-mom, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. working-mom

    working-mom Registered Redneck Woman

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    I am planning on getting a couple of blueberry dwarf plants for my porch. I don't have room in the yard to plant so I figure the next best thing is in container plants. Last year a I had tomatoes and they did wonderfully. I found some in guerneys catalog that look quite nice. The plants are called Dwarf Tophat. Does anyone out there know anything about this variety??? I think I am going to get some aluminum sulphate as well.
    Where do you get PH "sticks" to test the soils ph with??? Also should I use just potting soil in the containers or mix it with regular dirt or other??? I learned my lesson last year with my tomatoes as the 1st 50 tomatoes that came on to the plant got blossom end rot. I got that fixed as soon as I realized what it was, but it sure broke my heart to throw away all those huge tasty tomatoes.

    So before I jump into this any ideas and pointers would be greatly appreciated!!
    :eek: :)
    Thanks ahead of time!!!!
     
  2. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    Would you explain how you "fixed" the blossom end rot
    problem? Last I knew, the experts still weren't sure of the
    cause, e.g. calcium, water stress, etc. so if you've come upon
    something that works, you might be able to buy a whole
    blueberry farm!!!
    Regarding blueberries: you can get the pH in range with plain
    sulfur, then fertilize with something like Miracid. I've have about 40
    blueberry plants in pots that have been there for 3 years, and they
    bloom and produce fruit without any help from me, except to keep them
    watered. I just haven't gotten around to planting them...
    Ann
     

  3. working-mom

    working-mom Registered Redneck Woman

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    :eek:
    Well at first I didn't know what it was that was eating my tomatoes from the bottom up so I started looking around and asked questions on backwoods home .com forum anyway we all pretty much came to the conclusion that it was bloosom end rotand the reason I got it was because of low calcium in the soil that I used. Like I said I used only miracle grow potting soil so there must have not been enough calcium in the soil. Okay so I went down to the local grain/fert./pesticide store and asked about getting some calcium which they had they also recomended: ferti-lome brand Yeild Booster liquid, Stop blossom end rot. 2 Tblsp per 1 gallon of water for spray. I used this every couple of days, I sprayed all of the plant even the fruits. This is supposed to stop blossom end rot due to low calcium levels and it did wonderfully. I got probably close to 300 tomatoes off of each plant over a 3 month period. Like I said if I had caught it sooner I would have had more, alot more....
    Hope that helps!!
    Really all it is is a liquid form of calcium derived from calcium chloride. I also added powdered calcium to the soil but choose to use the spray too as it effects were faster than the powder alone.
    :eek:
    :D I wish I would have come up with it but alas I am not a quick bussiness person like that.... :eek:
     
  4. edjewcollins

    edjewcollins Well-Known Member

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    Isn't epsom salts supposed to be used for it's calcium content. It's one of those Jerry Baker tricks that is supposed to provide calcium to prevent BER.

    Ed


     
  5. working-mom

    working-mom Registered Redneck Woman

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    Well I don't know about epsom salts.... I 'll have to check that out.
    Thanks.