Dumb question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by dieselfreak, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. dieselfreak

    dieselfreak Alfalfa Jake

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    Lol sorry bout this because I know pretty much everyone understands but me. I see all sorts of abbreviations for people and I dont know what they stand for. I put two and two together to figure out DH but thats the only one I can get. Kinda confusing when I'm reading. Please help me!!
     
  2. jill.costello

    jill.costello Well-Known Member

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    DH= dear hubby
    DW= dear wife
    DD= dear daughter (dd1,dd2,dd3, etc)
    DS= dear son
    MIL= mother in law
    BTW= by the way
    ROFL= rolling on floor laughing (ROFLMAO= rolling on floor laughing my arm off)(not)
    IMHO= in my humble opinion
    my .02= my two cents worth
    Camp= slaughter/butcher
     

  3. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    Dont feel dumb! It took me by surprise when I first saw the abbreviations too!!! grin.
     
  4. Qwispea

    Qwispea Well-Known Member

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    What's "oy vey" mean?
     
  5. Columbia,SC.

    Columbia,SC. Thats MR. Redneck to you

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    :p All due respect. I think that is a yankee, Minn.SD.ND.Wisc. way of saying Ooohhweee! I think maybe Jewish also.
     
  6. jill.costello

    jill.costello Well-Known Member

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    "Oy vey" is Yiddish for "oh my", or "oh, gosh"

    Yiddish is a language that developed when Jews from all over Europe were housed in close quarters during the Holocaust in the concentration camps. They all could understand Hebrew fairly well, and interdispursed words and phrases from their own languages, as well, in order that they could all understand one another.

    For example, if I said "Isch been a Talmud ein din, zibenteh classe", it sounds very German or Czech, but the word "Talmud" is Hebrew for "School"

    I'm not sure why non-Jews would use the term "Oy Vey"!!
     
  7. Sammy

    Sammy Well-Known Member

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    It is generally believed that Yiddish became a language of its own some time between 900 and 1100 A.D., but it is difficult to be certain because in its early days, Yiddish was primarily a spoken language rather than a written language. .......... As Jews became assimilated into local culture, particularly in Germany in the late 1700s and 1800s, the Yiddish language was criticized as a barbarous, mutilated ghetto jargon that was a barrier to Jewish acceptance in German society.