Dumb question re: Hauling water

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by donsgal, Aug 9, 2006.

  1. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    Ok, here goes...

    If I haul water and do not use a gravity feed system, but rather a hand pump to get the water out of the tank - is there any way to be able to use a water heater? I realize that a water heater works on water pressure, so I am thinking that it isn't going to work without it.

    Does this mean, that the only way I am going to be able to have hot water is to heat it on the stove? Do any of you use this method? Is it lots more trouble than it is worth?

    Can you tell I'm new at this?

    Wisdom appreciated!

    donsgal
     
  2. arcticpixie

    arcticpixie Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Location:
    Interior Alaska
    We heat our water on the stove in a 2 gallon water bath canner. It isn't exactly easy but it gets the job done. You could use a hot water heater. Fill it, turn it on until the water is hot. Shut it off, open the valve at the top and use the hose bib at the bottom to fill things and repeat. Seems like a lot of trouble and a lot of electricity to me. :shrug: Not to mention if you forget to shut it off before you drain the tank the elements will burn out. Come to think of it, how would you fill it?

    If you have a woodstove, keep a heavy duty tea kettle on the top filled with water for those quick washups/cups of tea. For large projects like washing dishes/clothes, use the old pot on the stove trick. In the summer a turkey fryer type propane element keeps the heat out of the house.

    Don't tell anyone, but I used one of those turkey fryer burners in the house as a cook stove the first few months we lived here. Big no no I know. Although no one has been able to explain to me why a propane range is okay but not a single stand alone propane burner? Either way I have a real stove now :p
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

    Messages:
    28,248
    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Location:
    SE Missouri
    Any particular reason for using a hand pump instead of electric?

    It is not that bad to heat the water on the stove for your bath. Been doing it for years.
     
  4. Aintlifegrand

    Aintlifegrand Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,764
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2005
    Location:
    Louisiana
    Check out the Hot water on Demand Coleman makes. We bought one from Bass Pro Shop, but they also have them at other sporting goods stores like Academy Sports and I think you can buy them online. It is a pump, propane water heater in one. We bought the attachment shower head and take showers nightly. It heats all the way to 160, so I also use for dishes etc. I love it. We spent 169.00 on it and 12.99 for the sprayer. We haul water in 7 gallon jugs and the pump sits down in it. We built a shower outside, but they also have a tent for 49.00 that looked like it would work for privacy if needed.
     
  5. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

    Messages:
    7,273
    Joined:
    May 9, 2004
    Location:
    Zone 8a, AZ
    i think those little portable propane camp shower heater things LOL would be the way to go. I did some research on this back when we were hauling water and from what i remember any hot water heater needs at least 10 gpm to make it work right. hmm...could be 10 psi LOL dont remember which
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,360
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    My vote would be 10 psi. There are a lot of 4 gpm and less wells supplying hot water heaters, both tank & tankless.

    --->Paul
     
  7. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    Do they have an open flame? Can you use them inside? Do they take up a lot of space (my bathroom has *no* floor space) LOL.

    This sounds like a good solution.

    donsgal
     
  8. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,787
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    Location:
    IL, right smack dab in the middle
    Place 55 gal plastic drum or 2 in attic (pick a well supported spot we are talking about 450 lbs a drum here!) run a hose or pipe from it to your hot water heater KEEP IT FULL TA DA! If You decide to use a siphion be sure to put a T in the line with a valve so that you can start the siphion from downstairs if needed.
     
  9. goatlady

    goatlady Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,731
    Joined:
    May 31, 2002
    Location:
    No. Cent. AR
    from what I just read on the Coleman WEB site they are strictly for outdoor's usage not in a house.
     
  10. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    It's a mobile home - no attic.

    donsgal
     
  11. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    Well, I could bathe outside in the summer, but it would sure make for a long, stinky winter, I'm afraid.

    donsgal
     
  12. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,787
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    Location:
    IL, right smack dab in the middle
    Like the joke goes where do you want one? two ways to go a demand pump like Rvs use (put it on the outfeed side of the barreles or build an attic !All ya need is a post to hang barrels on or you could make a 4 post affair with a kids"tree" house sorta hiding the barrels.
     
  13. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,130
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2003
    Location:
    Verndale MN
    If you have electricity, get an immersion heater! It's a water heater element with a metal guard around it. NOT a deicer. I paid around $30 for mine. An immersion heater will heat up a five gal bucket of 40 degree water to bath heat in 15 minutes and up to boiling if you leave it on.
    I didn't want to pay for propane last winter so I moved into my 12 x 12 cabin and hauled water. The immersion heater was all I used for dishes & baths. If I would have had the wood stove hot enough to heat water I would have roasted myself!
     
  14. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,077
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Location:
    Wisconsin.. Zone 5
    We used 2 55 gal drums, one to catch the water, then pumped/filtered into second one. This was pumped by a 12 v "spayer" pump w/ pressure switch to a 2-1/2 gal elect water heater, set on lowest setting. You have a hot shower, but only 2-1/2 gals worth. Takes about 15 min to reheat.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  15. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

    Messages:
    5,398
    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Location:
    SW Missouri near Branson (Cape Fair)
    Those are dandy pics Hunter63, thanks! So many great ideas.

    donsgal
     
  16. ponyboy123

    ponyboy123 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    171
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2006
    Location:
    East coast, Canada
    Hey hunter, I like that set-up. Hot WH is run on 110 or 220? The pipe extending below the barrel, that for catching any large/solid particles?
     
  17. Aintlifegrand

    Aintlifegrand Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,764
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2005
    Location:
    Louisiana

    They say for outside use only. But you haven't lived until; you have taken a shower outside at night with a million stars above and a slight breeze...I told DH that we were going to plumb an outdoor shower when we do the house...It is very small about the size of a older computer CPU with a handle.
     
  18. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,077
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    Location:
    Wisconsin.. Zone 5
    ponyboy,
    The one I've been using is 110 v. Got it Menards for about $130 bucks.
    It is a 2-1/2 gal, but you can get 5-6 gal also. Before the gutter set up, we "hauled water" also, so was a pain to keep filled.
    Soooooo you can take as long of a shower as you want, but only 2-1/2 gal of hot water.
    Takes about 15 min to heat, and then we unplug it until needed.

    The pipe hanging down is a "first flush" cleans the stuff out of the gutters, (or at least in theory). Has a dribble hole so you don't get standing water for very long.