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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, folks!

If anyone is on the board now...

We are having some hay delivered later this AM. I was going to pull the remaining bales out of the hay shed and put them in on top of the new stuff, so the old gets used first. Some more experienced farmers have said not to bother - the hay will stay good for a long time and I'm just making work for myself (well, for my hubby.)

Current hay is about 1 year old, about 15 bales left so it will last the alpacas a couple months. I know you guys will tell me straight - what do you advise?

Thanks!
 

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well, as for year old hay, if kept good and dry, the oldtimers are right. It wont bother anything, but deending on how your sensibilities are, if you keep doing the same practicer of replacing your hay before the last of it is used up, then next year at this time, that hay will be 3 yrs old, and the year after that 3. Myself, I probably would feed the old hay first if I was your age, might even do it now, but if you want, u can splt the difference. Feed 5 of the 15 this year, and do so each succeeding year. That way, if you keep replacing the hay before its completly used up, your at least feeding some of the old stuff each year.
 

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Bill's right. Doesn't make much differance as long as it is cured out good and don't get wet or get to smelling musty. Okie, from right around where Bill is. I do like to feed my old hay first. We feed round bales, lots easier and if we have to buy hay, we try to buy by the ton.
 

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15 bales isn't a lot of bales to move out of the way. i would feed the old bales first. it will keep, but we like to keep in the habit of not letting old hay stay in the barn too many years.
 

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Hay will loose vitamins with storage, it's 15 bales not 1500 I'd shift them out of the way and put it on top to be fed first.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, folks, I'm going out to pull the bales now. But I won't stress if the hay guy gets here and there are a few left in the shed (BTW, brand new shed with shingle roof and dry as a bone.)

I'm also going to rig up a cleat and rope so we can store the straw (for bedding) in the loft of the barn and lower it down on a rope. I'm pretty new to all this stuff - it will be interesting to see how my concept works (or doesn't!)

Theories are beautiful things - reality is something else. I find myself having to "drop back and punt" quite a bit.

Thanks for your help! You've all done your good deed for the day.
 

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Another hay problem for yall to chew on.

FBB not of these folks are around today except maybe Ross.

:D Al
 

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But but some one today may have the same problem and this will help once ya'll finish fixing it.

:D Al
 
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Has anyone had a fire from tightly stacked hay bales?
 

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When we were making hay it was put in loose and usually gone by pasture time in the Spring. Some years when we acquired more animals we had to supplement with bought square bales. We never saved any over. We fed them first and saved the loose hay for later winter towards Spring when animals were freshening [ birthing] and needed better hay for nourishment. On the dairy farm where Bill grew up they baled their hay. Any left over was used first before any new bales. 40 cows eat a lot so there were not a lot of bales to move around.
 

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Has anyone had a fire from tightly stacked hay bales?
I've never had that problem but had a neighbor years ago that would lose a stack every few years. It isn't about being stacked too tight. It's about moisture content of the hay when it's being stacked. Properly cured, dry hay won't set itself afire.
 
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