Dumb alfalfa pellet question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by minny67, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. minny67

    minny67 Member

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    After seeing so many responses praising alfalfa pellets, I wanted to check the price at my local Farm & Fleet (where I purchase all my critter food). I'd love to stop seeing all the wasted hay!
    Strolling the aisles, I didn't see any alfalfa pellets, so I asked a store employee for help. He directed me to rabbit pellets, saying that rabbit pellets are nothing more than alfalfa pellets. Was he correct??

    Sorry if it's a really stupid question!
     
  2. oberhaslikid

    oberhaslikid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    NO!,Thier not the same I just went through this, some how we got a bag of rabbit pellets in with our alfalfa pellets in the same bag but there wasnt a tag on the bag.when I got to looking after opening it I noticed how much smaller the pellet was.I put in the feeders and the goats would not touch it.I had to clean out all the feeders and tried mixing in the grain bin and they wouldnt touch the grain.I should have taken it back,but I didnt.
    Next time I open a bag and find rabbit pellets in the alfalfa bag ,they will know about it at the store.Alfalfa pellets are bigger than the rabbit.Smell better too.
     

  3. dbarjacres

    dbarjacres Well-Known Member Supporter

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    See you are in IL. Fleet Farm or Farm and Fleets do not carry the pellets. We had to check at 3 feed mills before we found some too. We are in WI, I'm guessing because alfalfa hay is so readily avaible around here, that not many stock those. P.S. I give mine rabbit pellets as a treat if they are by the fence when I'm feeding the Flemish and they LOVE them, but the have lots more than alfalfa in them. Bought a bag of alfalfa pellets couple weeks ago, and had to feed them to the bunnies and donkeys as the goats despise them. Prefer the hay.
     
  4. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    My goats do in fact prefer hay as well, but not all of the hay, just the leaves. This leaves me with a huge amount of waste stems. With alfalfa pellets, they don't get to pick and choose. They eat ALL of it, except the dust, which I add to my pig's food. If they have to choose between grass hay and alfalfa pellets, the pellets will be hit hard, and only a little very nice grass hay will be eaten. That said, my girls, who have been on alfalfa pellets and grass hay for the last 10 months, are in the best condition they've ever been, and I used to go through H--L trying to find only the finest, most tender and leafy fourth-cutting alfalfa with just the right moisture content. Pellets are not only the no-waste option, they're the no-hassle option!

    And no, alfalfa pellets are not the same as rabbit pellets. Rabbit pellets have a lot of other things in them besides alfalfa. Also, it's unlikely that you would find alfalfa pellets by "strolling the aisles" in any of the feed stores around here. They come in 50-lb sacks and are kept in the warehouse area with the other grains and feeds packaged in 50-lb sacks.
     
  5. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    How much do alfalfa pellets cost? I'm trying to deal with hay here, without a barn to keep it in, and have already lost some to the weather, in spite of having it tarped. I'm wondering if it would be more cost-effective to just buy the pellets.

    Kathleen
     
  6. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    I pay $8 for a 50 lb bag of alfalfa pellets. They're kept in the back of the store with the other hay and grains.

    One thing that I noticed a couple of weeks ago when the barns flooded (6" of rain in one day on top of frozen ground, everything flooded around here) - it's easy to get bags of pellets onto shelves and off of the ground. It's not so easy to move a haystack. I had to toss 500 lbs of hay because it molded.
     
  7. minny67

    minny67 Member

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    Thanks for the quick replies!!
    I was moderately sure they weren't the same-but thought maybe the employee knew something I didn't!
    Guess I'll have to start calling around to the feed stores!
    Thanks again!
     
  8. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    That said, my girls, who have been on alfalfa pellets and grass hay for the last 10 months, are in the best condition they've ever been, and I used to go through H--L trying to find only the finest, most tender and leafy fourth-cutting alfalfa with just the right moisture content. Pellets are not only the no-waste option, they're the no-hassle option!
    .........................................................

    Jen, I know you like me have likely taken alot of grief for changing our mangement to this, but it is true, folks who have done it always email back to tell me how much better their stock looks, and milks and how much cheaper at the end of the year it is. And no more miles high pile of compost that contains megadollars worth of alfalfa hay in it. The biggest difference in the pellet with now less grain is that my kids grow better, my milkers milk more with less problems with loosing weight, and my big girls are big, hard, not big and jiggly! It's all the carbs in the grain! So it's Atkins out in the barn!

    dbarjminis: My girls would soo much more love to waste and pick through alfalfa hay than eat pellets also, but they have no choice but to eat the pellets because the closest alfalfa hay sits in a feed store 17 miles away for nearly $10 per 50 pound bale!! You have to take away the alfalfa hay to get them to eat the pellets. Just make sure they are 17% alfalfa pellets and not the lower protein ones extruded with chaff from oats. The name brand pellets, Purina etc, run nearly 10$ per 50, by going off brand here we get ours for $7.90.

    My biggest reason for moving from the hay, with loading, finding, hauling, lifting, cleaning up afterwards all the spent hay in the bedding :) is the keeping quality. My does are due in March, what is the vitamin and protein content of the alfalfa hay sitting in your hot humid barn down here all winter? It's nearing 9 months old, so then you compensate for the lack of stuff in your yellowing hay with more and more grain...YEP glad to be off that rollercoaster. Vicki
     
  9. Donna

    Donna TrailRider

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    I am from Wisconsin where alfalfa hay is very available but a pure waste to feed to goats and all the extra cleaning to haul all the stalks as they just pick the leaves! It comes to a big pile of uneaten,lucky I have horses that will eat the waste. I went to the alfalfa pellets in September after Vicki reccomended and they are GREAT! No waste and it actually is cheaper because of the no waste to feed.I love them!!
    Donna
     
  10. Mr. Dot

    Mr. Dot Well-Known Member

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    I also mix and match hay and pellets. Girls are fed pellets morning and evening and have hay during the day. There's a lot of "waste" with the hay but it all goes to the compost heap and garden. This hay is virtually the only organic matter produced on the place and is worth its weight in gold to us. If anything I'd like to have twice as much of it as I do (and half as much of what sprouts from it).
     
  11. Starsmom

    Starsmom Well-Known Member

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    I get my alfalfa pellets from a local rancher who has a feed operation as well. I pay $120 per ton. I put them in barrels with lids and they store well as long as no moisture. Our local feed store doesn't carry them, besides the bulk is much cheaper. No fuss, no muss and especially no waste!
     
  12. suzyhomemaker09

    suzyhomemaker09 Well-Known Member

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    We have goats and sheep pastured together, feed alfalfa pellets to the goats. They love them...have hay out for them all the time for them as well so we don't have to feed everyone alfalfa , costs about $8 a #50 or so.. it varies. as for storage, it can be easily stored in drums or even an inexpensive rubbish can from Wallyworld. I've seen them for less that $5