Drying Laundry in Winter

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Tango, Jun 4, 2005.

  1. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Won't have a dryer at my new property. I have thougth about getting one of those spinner dryers and hanging clothes on a line. The spinner would be handy in cooler months (not needed at al in the summer) but do clothes dry in winter before becoming humid smelling? How have ya'll handled these energy challenges?
     
  2. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    Submit to reality and buy a dryer.
     

  3. Irish Pixie

    Irish Pixie "You have to be odd to be number one." Dr Seuss

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    I dry clothes on racks by the wood stove in the winter, Tango. It works well, even heavy jeans are dry in less than a day. You can hang lines inside too if you have the room. I rarely use my dryer.
    Stacy
     
  4. Steph in MT

    Steph in MT Well-Known Member

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    Hi Marcia~
    I don't have a dryer and managed to still get laundry done through the winter here in Montana. Just wait for the "nice" days (relative term...) to do your laundry. Some days I had to take it down and re-hang it the next but it always dried. Just make sure you have plenty of socks and undies as the good days may be few and far between. :)
    Steph
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Just put your clothes line in the sunniest spot you can find. If it isn't raining or foggy they should dry ok. I have freeze dried clothes in colorado, it takes several days but they don't sour. If you have the wood stove going then you can get a wooden clothes dryer to put next to it. One place I lived in MS had an old floor furnace in the hall. I used dowel rods from one door frame to another and hung clothes on clothes hangers from it then put a wooden dryer over the furnace. Really did a good job.

    It is a good idea to run a fan to push the heat from the wood stove into the room and it will also dry the clothes faster. Air circulation is the key to drying indoors without souring.
     
  6. tnborn

    tnborn Well-Known Member

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    Tango,
    I hang my stuff on drying racks so the stove can dry them.
    tnborn
     
  7. edcopp

    edcopp Well-Known Member

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    My Amish neighbors hang laundry out in all kinds of weather. Some days take longer than others. They usually have laundry on the line by 7:30 A.M. so it has all day to dry.
     
  8. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We don't have a dryer...and havent for many years which included 4 toddlers and husband in uniforms. Hang them all year round on good days where you are.

    In Maine I hang ours by the woodstove with a fan. It helps to replac humidity in the house in winter as well. I do about 2 loads a day on the woodstove rack and I make my kids do the hanging....
     
  9. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone :) will need to add "woodstove," to my list of appliances :)
     
  10. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

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    As a retired farmer with all the goodies I gotta tell ya --- I admire your free spirits and individual thinking BUT this nonsense of ignoring conveniences is absurd. You can and DO get so mean-headed you get to thinking The Devil invented all our stuff.
    God gave 'man' an inventive nature. Use it and them to convenience your life. Don't work yourself to an early grave or leave the country out of frustration.
     
  11. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sneaky.....I have a lot of other conveniences but my dryer was always conveniently driving the light bill up sky high.....now I get the same job done passively for nothing.....it works for me!
     
  12. ajaxlucy

    ajaxlucy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A friend of mine used to live up in Newfoundland as a child. She says she remembers her mother hanging up the washed clothes on the line in wintertime. After they'd frozen solid, her mom would beat the ice out with a broom handle, then bring them back indoors.
     
  13. Steph in MT

    Steph in MT Well-Known Member

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    I'm with you mpillow~ it's a financial issue for us as well. I have no problem with and love my chosen conveniences but I like to save $ when I can too. :)
    Steph
     
  14. tnborn

    tnborn Well-Known Member

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    Yep, I save $$$ too by hanging out the clothes. :)I love saving money and taking it away from the electric companies. :dance:
    tnborn
     
  15. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    NWS: convenience is relative. I hang out year-round in north-central WV. There is always a good day to do laundry. I often do 2 loads a day due to the linens I use in my work. I love getting outside all year round. The dryer doesn't heat up the house in the summer, require cleaning out of a vent to prevent one of the common forms of fire ignition and it doesn't take up precious room in my basement.

    I have never owned a dryer, even though offered a gas one for free for several reasons. The most important reason being I prefer how laundry dries on the line. My clients love the line dried linens and think I am pampering them. Some study alleged that sunshine decreases dust mites. During the winter if the weather is particularly bad, I am lucky enough to have a forced air furnace and place the clothesrack over a vent. I have even turned on the gas heater in my office to warm that room for clothes and bread rising on the worst days. My gas is free so it doesn't cost anything. And fans do help keep the air moving in a humid basement. In the winter my basement heat vent is open, so that and the de-humidifier I have running to prevent dampness in general get my clothes dry in a jiffy down there on a line.

    I do not see hanging laundry as a burden, but if you do then get a dryer. I find other things frustrating however, that I am sure others here practice. To each his own, just don't assume everyone finds a task as distasteful as you do.
     
  16. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm with Ajaxlucy. In winter, you just beat the clothes once they've frozen and the ice falls off. I have three of those folding dryer racks that I use in the winter, and in the summer too since I have a very short clothesline. If your house is damp, your clothes may never dry unless you take added measures. Even jeans dry on my wooden racks, though they take longer. There's also the iron, which will finish drying if you are in a hurry. I have noticed that when you take clothes out of a front loading washing machine they are much dryer than when taken out of a top loader, so anyone wishing to hang dry their clothes would be much happier with a front loader (and they use less electricity and water as well)

    Many people prefer machine dried clothes because they come out softer. If your line dried clothes and towels are stiff, it is from the detergent you are using. Just use Borax and a little Basic H. For towels, I usually only use a little Borax or nothing at all.
     
  17. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    lp dryers are cheaper to run for the 3 months you have to
     
  18. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    I don't believe in the devil. I'm not Christian. This has nothing to do with religion.
     
  19. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We hang ours inside the house year-round. We stuck a couple of racks, one a wooden folding type and the other a metal rack which we use for clothes on hangers, in an unused bedroom. Clothes almost always dry within a day- they actually dry faster in the winter with the heat on than they do in the summer with no heat. Even in the summer jeans dry in a little more than a day.

    We also have a gas dryer, but I usually only use that for bulky items like blankets and comforters.
     
  20. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    i just hang a rope across the living room in the winter and dry them inside! they dry in about an hour or less when the stove is going. no problem at all, though i do now have a dryer i seldom use it!