Drying Hickory Cane Corn from Waverly TN

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Rick, Sep 15, 2005.

  1. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We came back to the homestead after a two month absence, to find 12 foot stalks of our goat poo nourished Hickory Cane- from the corn Ken sent me.

    Can anyone tell me how to dry stalkless ears of the corn,??
    We have to leave early tomorrow for my brothers wedding.
    I can refrigerate them for 3 days, if I can't prepare them quickly tonight.

    Thanks,

    Rick
     
  2. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    first it's hickory king.

    second to dry it you can simply tie twine around the cob and hang in your closet. dont chill it, or when you take it out to dry it, if it is still hydrated it'll rot.

    i have a bunch of cobs drying in a spare bedroom right now of hickory king and of that batch i have already planted another plot so i know my method works, it's not rocket science, just get some twine, make slipnots and put the cob in the slipknot then tighten, add another till it's as long as you want it. put it in the closet and forget about it.
     

  3. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    First, thanks for the advice.

    Second, see the following posting about Hickory Cane Corn.

    http://www.homesteadingtoday.com/showthread.php?t=73448&highlight=hickory+cane

    Be Well...

     
  4. All country

    All country Well-Known Member

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    You guys have ears mature enough to dry??????

    Ours just finally tasseled out a few weeks ago and sons finally found little ears forming last week. I don't know if they will be ready before frost or not. Of course 3 times we thought we had lost the entire patch. We had a few nasty storms come thru and lay the whole patch down. The last one it stayed down for almost 2 weeks before it started standing again. Cannot believe how tall this corn has gotten. Hope it turns out OK. This has been my oldest boys project this year and he has tried to take good care of it. Even put up a special fence to protect it from the chickens, just couldn't do much about the winds.
     
  5. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    cool, sounds tasty, i stand corrected.

    all country: I am working on my second harvest of the season, grown from the seed from the first harvest ;)
     
  6. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Here in NE Ohio we are about the same spot as those folks above. Did you get your corn in late?
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    As far as I know the seed I passed out is Hickory Cane - not the commonly available Hickory King. Seems to be very little firm information on these as there are references to both going back into the late 1800s. They may have been two different, but perhaps related, strains of a very large white dent corn with had enough sweetness in it to pass for sweetcorn at the time. How sweet? Well, probably not by today's standards, but better than field corn back then.

    My WAG is Hickory Cane has been kept true while Hickory King (which may have been Hickory Cane initially) was crossed with something else to add more sweetness to it. To differentiate it from Hickory Cane they gave it a new name???

    I have no idea what commerical hominy and white corn meal is made out of today.

    True Hickory Cane has eight rows of kernels - period. If more than it is likely Hickory King, which can have 8, 10 or 12.

    I have received probably about a dozen letters now from people saying they have tried Hickory King and it just isn't the Hickory Cane they remember. Hickory King just doesn't make as good of hominy or white corn meal. Memories can be faulty though.

    I did notice the Hickory King stalks someone in the area let me cut for cattle feed turned brown much quicker than the Hickory Cane stalks my supplier still has. A couple of them are still fairly green.

    Perhaps in 2006 someone can raise separate patches of each and then try them as a sweetcorn, as hominy and as white corn meal for comparison.

    By the way, I haven't counted them, but I have a stack of outstanding request letters about 12" tall.

    For those who grew some this year, I don't need the cobs, just the kernels sometime before early Spring.
     
  8. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    I'd just like to point out, that when I ate my hickory king as soon as it was mature it was ultra sweet. Like the crap at the supermarkets.

    You know, it could simply be nothing more than a mispronounciation that took off.

    I gotta say tho, hickory king is GOOD stuff. It's good raw and sweet, and its great dried up, and it's *even better* when it is halfway between the two extremes, when it is still soft and slightly sweet but just starting to get mealy. cut the kernals from the cob and saute in butter. It's divine.
     
  9. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    I just went and counted rows, my hickory king is all over the place from 8 to 12.

    I'm curious, Rick, does any of your corn contain more rows?
     
  10. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We planted ours in well aged goat manure the holler (low light and cool nights) the 3rd week in June. Due family circumstances we could not return for 9 weeks. They were well watered for 10 days, and then they were on there own, with a promise of dew each morning, and 60 degrees at night.

    We picked them with brown tassles when we came back home, maybe a little early, to protect them from the deer.

    Paranoid, I counted 8 rows on an uneaten cob in the compost pile.

    Our city corn in good light, but warmer nights and less dew only hit 8 1/2 feet. They also started 3 weeks later.


    How long should they stay tied- can they stay in the husk until needed, or is it a set time?

    I'm going to a wedding in Brooklyn tomorrow, so I may not revisit til next week.

    Rick


     
  11. Paranoid, just curious, did you get the hickory cane seeds that Ken sent out to us all to try in our gardens? With the agreement that we would send him back some kernals to grow next year.

    Ken, I think mine might be just about dry enough to mail back to you. How soon do you want them?

    My crop done fairly good, it could have been much better. But I needed to beef up my soil that I planted them in. I didn't want to plant them in my regular garden as I was feared they might cross with my sweet corn. But I did end up with a few really good ears to send to Ken and a whole lot of extra to plant a big patch next year.
     
  12. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    no, mine is most deffinately "hickory king" if there are in fact 2 distinct types, and not from ken.

    rick, if critters arent a problem, you can let your corn dry on the stalk. if you dont want that you can let it dry off the stock in the husk. you can also peel the husk back and remove the silk, and braid the husks from each ear to form something decorative. long story short it'll dry out no matter what you do to it as long as it's in a dry place.

    one nice thing if you dont want to try my ghetto twine idea is to make a drying setup by getting a square piece of wood, paybe 1 inch to a side, and driving thin nails to it at an angle, then an X at the bottom so it'll stand. Then just grab each ear and shove it onto the protruding nails. I forget what it's called but it ends up looking like a corn "christmas" tree.
     
  13. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    I won't be sending out more until probably February or March so anytime before February will be fine. Have a concern if I send it out now, it may be lost or something before next planting season. Less chance of that if I wait until after January.

    Plus, have a bit of an motive for then also. Post Office does it carrier route volume count in the early part of the year. Thus, sending them out then helps my route carrier build up her contract daily compensation rate for the next 12-month period. While others may not be happy with their carrier(s), I am extremely pleased with mine.

    Yes, kernels on the cob will dry satisfactory under a variety of conditions. To me in a dry place would be better than standing, but... You can largely tell when to remove the kernels by feel. When dry enough you can rub off kernels with your hands. If too moist they will be hard to take off. You can somewhat tell by when most farmers in your area are harvesting shelled corn.

    Friends wanted some stalks from JW's patch for a Holloween display. They gave me the ears so I have about 30 of them on hand. I check them all last evening. Out of that box I found four with ten rows. Noticed they were pretty well the smallest of the ears. Really big ears only had eight row.

    JW has been using the same seedstock from seeds he obtained from his parents and JW is about 80 years old now. He cannot guarantee some crossing might have occurred sometime. Thus, when you choose one or more ears to send me the kernels from please use only eight rowed.

    If the package will weight more than 12 ounces, cheapest way to send them would be via priority mail flat rate envelope. You can pick up one at your local Post Office.
     
  14. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    I take it that this is a long season corn. Any guess at the number of days to maturity? Growing up we ate alot of field corn, and honestly I miss the texture. I might have to get on that list Ken, if it isn't too late that is. I would put in a separate patch just to keep it from crossing.

    Shane
     
  15. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    I was just about to post to Ken that mine is ready to mail back to him...
    Not all of the rows where the same number, but I will start to cull for the correct number from now on, I didn't count the rows on what I bagged up to send back, so It may be off. I know it did not get to cross with something else here, it was the only corn in silk for at least a 1/4 to the nearest neighbor, with trees all around and None of my near by neighbors grow corn.

    I'll have it in the mail next trip to town.
     
  16. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Saving seed kernals from eight rowed ears only should help keep it at that number of rows. As noted in the box of ears I have, all of the big ears had eight rows.
     
  17. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    sylvar, figure about 3.5-4 months