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I was just curious is there was anyone here who never uses a dryer to dry their clothes, but always line-dries. I have recently begun to dry all my clothes on a clothesline outside...except for good colored clothing which I hang dry inside so they don't get too faded.

But, what about in the winter? When it gets below 32? Do you dry everything inside on indoor racks? If you do hang-dry outside, how long does it take to dry the clothes in colder weather.

Sorry if this is a stupid question.


Thanks, Jodi
 
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I use my dryer about 30 minutes, just enough to keep the towels from being totally sandpaper, then hang out. My older frontloader doesn't do a short tumble to take out the creases like new ones do.

Some things that will affect drying time is how warm or cool your house is, whether you locate the rack near a vent, how wet your clothes are coming out of the washer--the new frontloaders spin them almost dry.
 

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Yes, I do have one of the newer front-loaders and they do indeed spin them almost dry. One reason I have decided to try doing all air-drying.



Jodi
 

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I think sometimes they will dry just as fast outside on a crisp sunny winter day as they do on a very humid day in the summer. If I feel like being outside, I hang them outside, otherwise is hang on racks and lines inside.
 

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When it is so cold our laundry freezes while we hang it, with some sun and wind it can still be dry by days end.

Not a stupid question at all, by the way.
 

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Thank you for the replies. I have a feeling my dryer will become one of my least used appliances now!



Jodi
 

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if it is dry outside, I hang outside. Even if it is 18 degrees outside. If it is dry, even if there is snow on the ground, it generally dries if I hang it first thing in the morning and leave it much of the day.

In cold wet weather, I hang after the children go to bed and take it down before they get up. It is almost always dry. We do mostly heat with wood though.

I have 2 drying racks and one place along a ceeiling rafter that didnt get totally enclosed...so I have sort of like a 2 inch shelf at ceiling height. Lets ee, I keep chalkboard chalk, matchbox cars up there. I can also hang hangers over the edge to hang clothes to dry in the winter.

If my husband ever decides to finish that little project, he will get some argurment from me. That has become an invaluble spot.

I use a laundramat about 5 times a year.
Generally not because I have to but because I am stressed about laundry...usually during the winter

so probobly the day before Christmas Eve, I would wash everything and then take it to the laundramat to dry

or the day before Company comes

or if we have had 4 or 5 days of snow or rain and I have been chasing mud/childrens wet mittens etc

or if half the family have been sick

you get the idea. At first, I decided that I would try to never use a dryer... and then realized that if I am stressed, my family suffers...so I use the laundramat without guilt, if I feel I need to.
 

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Discovered last winter that things dry outside nearly as fast as inside with the stove!?? I'd hang the clothes out and they'd freeze stiff. When I looked out and they had started flapping in the breeze again it meant they were dry and I'd bring them in.
 

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We have a line and a dryer. During a Florida summer, we get a LOT of rain. Almost on a daily basis. Sometimes it is hard to get a single load of clothes dry. You can wash early, hang on the line to dry but with the high humidity, it takes a while to dry. Often times, before it is dry, you have to run out and take everything off the line for an approaching sea breeze shower. Afterward, while you are in a steambath, you re-hang the clothes and all the wrinkles are steamed out by the air. Then you let them dry a bit longer in the 99% humidity before dashing back out to take them off the line for the next shower. In summer, it is much easier and far more productive to use a dryer.

Gina
 

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I don't have a dryer. I use the outside lines as long as possible. When it is rainy, snowy or really cold, I switch to inside. In my laundry room, I have three lines strung, Light weight items dry OK in here, but is is cold, so heavy items do not dry very fast.

We have a woodburner in the dining room. I have two clotheslines that I made with hooks on the ends and they reach across the room. I also have two wooden clothes racks. Along one log beam, I have horseshoes bent at an angle to hang hangers on, there are 16 of them, I think. I normally hang laundry at night, then take it down in the morning. With six people, it is an ongoing process, espcially with blankets, sheets and towels. If you don't have a dryer, you have to stay on top of it all of the time! But it does save a lot of money around here. When I switched to compact flourescent bulbs and took the dryer completley out of the house, my bill dropped almost $70 in one month.
 

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We have never owned a dryer and even though people think that sounds nuts, we just don't need to. Even in WV there are sunny or warmer winter days to do laundry. If the weather really is wet, I simply hang out in the basement or near one of the heating vents in the house, maybe in the sunny window on the third floor.

I think you will find it rewarding. It really doesn't take any more time, if you factor in that sometimes you have to re-start a clothes dryer cause they are still wet. On great hot days they are dry in an hour. We have lots of laundry--about 15 extra sets of linens each week. My Staber washer has been a terrific addition as it toploads, but spins like a front loader and very dry. Makes lots of things easier.
 

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I don't have a dryer and hang clothes out year round unless it is raining (which isn't much of a problem here). The clothes I hang out are usually dry before I can get the next load washed. And the towels get soft, like they do in a dryer, on a really windy day so I try to do the towels those days.
 

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We don't have a dryer and don't want one. When we had to have a new washer this year the sales man tried to sell us a matching drier but we didn't want it. He thought we were crazy!

We line dry in the summer and in the winter on pretty days. On rainy days we dry in the pantry room off the kitchen where we have a couple of short lines streched across. MOst anything will dry there overnight except the heaviest blue jeans.

In the winter with the wood-burning heater going we can dry even jeans overnight by hanging them on a hanger in the room with the heater, NOT near the heater as a fire hazard. best wishes. WE LOVE line-dried clothes!
 

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in the sumer I hang out when the weather permits.

in the winter i hang inside as the wood stove heat is so dry it dries clothes FAST.
I reserve the dryer for when i am being lazy or the humidity keeps them damp all day on the lines.
 

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I never use a dryer. We have no winter here, but lots of rain and humidity. I hang the clothes on drip-dry hangers and use a pole to hang those on a line running through the porch rafters. When the clothes are dry, we "harvest" them and hang them directly in the closet. Due to hard water, the clothes are not as wrinkle-free or as soft as they would be with a dryer, but they last longer and fade slower. The fresh feel and smell is worth the trade-off.
 

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I am so happy that so many of you hang your clothes out. It went so out of fashion that I didn't think it would come back. Some communities even ban the clothes line from yards! That dryer uses so much electricity that it's absolutely amazing people can afford to use it, but they have learned to consider it a necessity, hugh? Yes, clothes freeze dry, but I also don't like frozen fingers and watch for sunnier days, but in my "old age" I do fluff a few things after I bring them in. BTW, once you get used to hanging out clothes, it really isn't all that time-consuming, especially after you look at your electric bill. And don't you just LOVE that fresh smell!
 

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The part I like best about hanging laundry outside, is that it's like the ironing fairy came and pressed it all!

When I use the dryer, I ALWAYS forgot about the laundry in there, so it's always a wrinkled mess.

Plus, towels dried outside work much better, than when you put them in the dryer. I haven't a clue why, but they seem to absorb so much better when they're line dried.
 

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It doesn't matter if my colored clothes fade, but if you're worried about yours why not turn them inside out.
 
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