Dry Milk... RAW Powdered?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by chickflick, Aug 27, 2004.

  1. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    Guess I should do an internet search... :eek: BUT maybe some of you know:

    Is there a source for RAW powdered milk? Is this even possible? I was thinking it would be NICE to have that.. If one wanted to make butter, cheese, etc. In, shall we say UNfavorable conditions.. emergencies etc.

    Anyone?

    I just realized.. DOH!! My little spanish goat lost her kid about three weeks ago.. I should have got to milking her. (BUT... I'm not fond of 'goaty' things) :no:
     
  2. mysticokra

    mysticokra Well-Known Member

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    Why bother? The beneficial bacteria will all be dead in a dried milk.
    The enzymes will probably be cooked away. You might as well get the dried pastuerized crap. You will never be able to make butter, cheese unless you could re-introduce the living cultures, in which case you didn't need the dried milk.

    Cheese was actually the original "gotta make the milk last a long time" alternative.
     

  3. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    FOUND THIS: :D

    http://www.gentlespirit.com/gs6n02/v6n02c.htm

    Natural Meals in Minutes
    with Rita Bingham

    3-Minute (Fat-Free!) Powdered Milk Cheeses

    Making cheese at home used to be an all-day process. Now you can have fat-free cheeses for salads, sandwiches or casseroles - ready in almost an instant!

    Nonfat dry milk, usually non-instant, is a good basic food to keep on your pantry shelf as a source of protein. If you are storing milk, 50 pounds of dry milk powder per person should be stored; over the period of one year, this amount would provide 22.2 grams of protein per day and could be consumed as three eight-ounce glasses of milk or ½ cup of cheese.

    The brand of non-instant milk I use requires three cups of dry powder to make one gallon of liquid milk. Adjust the recipes to the quantities given for your particular brand of powdered milk.

    Good-tasting whey from the cheese-making process can be used to replace water in nearly any recipe. The sweet whey changes the flavor of the finished cheese. Whey can be reused (in place of water) up to three times in making cottage cheese, resulting in a sweeter cheese with each use. The sweet cheese can be made into sweet dips and sauces for crackers and fruit salads. (Note: If you will get a stronger, less desirable flavor with each batch.)

    Uses for Homemade Cheese and Cottage Cheese

    Because most homemade cheese made from powdered skim milk have the unique quality of not melting, they are more versatile than commercial dairy products. The important thing to remember is that when heated at high temperatures, they become more firm and tough, so avoid boiling.

    Unflavored cheeses: Soups, salads, sandwiches taco filling, stir-fry, omelets, patties, loaves, casseroles, lasagna, on freshly sliced tomatoes, or mixed with one-half commercial cottage or grated cheese.

    Flavored cheeses: Chip dips, sandwich fillings, casserole toppings, jerky, mixed with parmesan to use on top of pizza and spaghetti, seasoned with curry powder to use in cracked wheat and rice pilaf.

    Flavor-causing enzymes come from bacteria which produce acid and then release enzymes. That bacteria is found in commercial cheese making cultures, but since those cultures are expensive and have a very short shelf life, I eliminate the long culturing process and use an acid to curdle the milk while the milk is heating, often adding buttermilk or other spices and herbs. When I want a different flavor or texture or a cheese that can be aged for one-two months, I use buttermilk, yogurt or acidophilus as cultures.

    Drain and rinse cheese made with old, strong milk powder to improve color and flavor. I rinse the cheese first in hot water which seems to take out the strong taste, ten in cold water, which lightens the color and firms the curd.

    Cheese colorings can be added to any recipe during the blending process. Dairies, some health food or preparedness stores and mail order catalogs for cheese supplies carry liquid or tablet forms of yellow coloring. Paste coloring can be obtained from stores that carry cake decorating supplies. Ordinary food coloring made for home use is not permanent and will not work as it rinses out during the rinsing and draining process.

    Important Helpful Hint: Always spray the inside of a warmed saucepan with lecithin-based spray and re-heat until oil browns before adding milk to the pan.


    Rennet Cheese

    1 qt hot tap water
    1 c. Buttermilk
    2 junket rennet tablets dissolved in 1 T. Cold water
    2 c. Dry milk powder
    2 T. Vegetable oil (opt.)

    Blend all ingredients and place in a heavy saucepan coated with a nonstick spray. Let sit undisturbed for 10 minutes. Cut or stir to break into curds and cook over medium heat for five minutes. Pour curds into a strainer, rinse with hot, then cold water, and drain. Salt to taste, then refrigerate. Or, place in a cheesecloth bag and press. This is a very mild cheese, good with salt and chopped chives. Use within 3-4 days.

    To make cream cheese from this recipe, reduce rennet to ¼ table and add 1 c. Buttermilk when mixing ingredients. Set in a warm place overnight. After cutting set curds into cubes, place curds over medium heat, and cook five minutes. Pour into a cheesecloth lined colander and let rest 15 minutes. Gather edges of bag, secure with a rubber band and hang, or press until firm like cream cheese. Add salt if desired.

    Soft Cottage Cheese

    2 c. hot water
    1-1/2 c. dry milk powder
    3 T. Fresh lemon juice or white vinegar

    Blend water and dry milk and pour into saucepan (foam and all).

    Sprinkle lemon juice or vinegar slowly around edges and gently stir over medium heat just until milk begins to curdle, separating into curds and whey. Remove from heat and let rest one minute. Pour into strainer or colander, rinse with hot, then cold water. Press out water with back of spoon. Makes about 1-1/2 c. curds. If desired, moisten rinsed curds with a little buttermilk before serving and add salt to taste. Refrigerate if not used immediately. Whey from fresh milk powder can be used in place of water in breads and soups.

    Quick Soft Pressed Cheese

    2 c. boiling water
    1-1/2 c. dry milk powder
    3 T. vegetable oil
    1 c. buttermilk
    3-4 T. fresh lemon juice
    cheese coloring tablets (opt.)

    Blend water, milk and oil, allowing foam to settle slightly. If colored cheese is desired, add ½ tablet cheese coloring (or cake decorating paste color) while blending. Pour into hot saucepan coated with a nonstick spray and heat to at least 160 degrees. Add lemon juice and continue to stir until mixture curdles.

    Pour into a cheesecloth lined colander. Rinse curds with warm water, then salt to taste. Place cheese in cloth between two plates or spoon into a cheese press. Apply weight and let sit for ½ hour or longer, depending on how firm you want the cheese to be. Remove from plates or cheese press, rinse, wrap in plastic and refrigerate. Use within one month or freeze. This cheese can be sliced, grated, or crumbled. For Smoky Cheese, add ½ t. Liquid Smoke flavoring and ½-1 t. salt after rinsing curds.

    For additional fast powdered milk cheese recipes, along with recipes for yogurt, sour cream, cream cheese, order your copy of Rita's Powdered Milk Cheeses for only $5.50 (includes postage) by calling toll-free (800) 484-9377, ext. 6276.

    Copyright 1998, natural Meals in Minutes. -*
     
  4. blhmabbott

    blhmabbott We're gettin' there!

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    I never woulda thought you could make cheese from dry milk...wow! And it sounds kinda simple too. I buy dry milk 25 pounds at a time and mix it with the milk we get from the dairy to make it go farther and to up the protein. I also keep some mixed up just for baking with, but we don't drink it straight. Thanks for posting this...it could really come in handy because we're big cheese eaters but can't afford it very often!
    Heather
     
  5. chickflick

    chickflick Well-Known Member

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    "whey from the cheese-making process can be used to replace water in nearly any recipe"

    WHAT?????? Help... I've heard it.. but I don't DO cows!! :eek:
     
  6. WillowWisp

    WillowWisp Well-Known Member

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    Saving the website ideas to my computer for dry milk cheese variations, very cool!! :)

    Just curious, we don't use dry milk. How do you get it to taste good for drinking?

    God bless
    Michelle
     
  7. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    I was told that dry milk has to be non fat because the fat will go rancid if not removed, and to make it taste better for drinking try some vanilla extract and maybe a touch of sweetner.
     
  8. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Doesn't the drying process oxidize the cholesterol, as it does in dried egg?
     
  9. Deb&Al

    Deb&Al Well-Known Member

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    sue,

    i've read that somewhere, about the dry milk and powdered eggs, and anything oxidized is bad for you, along the lines of free radicals, i think.

    by the way, processed oils have the same problem. stuff like wesson and crisco. i've been using lard and olive and flax oil for quite some time now.

    debbie
     
  10. Sandhills

    Sandhills Well-Known Member

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    I've toured a plant where they make dry milk. Actually the plant made both butter and dry milk. First they seperate the cream from the milk to make the butter then the milk was piped to the top of a tall tower that had really hot air blowing through it and allowed to drop through the hot air. When it reached the bottom it was dry milk. I hope that makes sense. As far as I know nothing weird was done to the milk. Although, I'm sure all the good bacterias that you want are long dead.
     
  11. blhmabbott

    blhmabbott We're gettin' there!

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    IMO, you can't :rolleyes: . That's why I mix it half and half with milk we buy from the dairy. You can't tell the difference in cereal, and only a little bit in drinking. I use it straight for baking though....easier on the budget and the fat/calorie content of the recipe. I've found it doesn't work well for cooking though in some things, like condensed soup. Blech!
    Heather