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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Parents got me a bottem drop spindle set for Christmas and I am trying to figure out how to use it...I have watched several youtube videos and read several articles but I can't figure it out!:confused: So here are my Questions....
  1. How do you keep the Wool from twisting?? I read that you shouldn't let it backspin but when I try to spin it, it doesn't want to spin forwards because the wool is all twisty which makes it backspin...
  2. How do you keep "Clumps" from forming in the stuff you have already spun?
  3. What is the best way of conecting the wool to the spindle?
Thanks in advance!!
The Confused One:confused:
 

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Well Cowgirl if you don't let twist into your wool you don't have spun yarn. Spinning means twisting the yarn. The trick is to put the right amount of twist into the fibers (wool) you are working with. The lumps and "over twist" are just part of being a new spinner, it is natural for that to happen for a while until you learn more. Don't expect perfect yarn for awhile now. Practice is the best thing by far.

Have you read the Spinning 101 thread yet? You will find the Spinning 101 thread in one of the stickies at the top of the forum.

One of the best ways to get your fibers onto the spindle is to tie on a "leader". A leader is a length if yarn, usually commercial spin, that can be anywhere from 6" long to a few feet. I think average is about a foot long. Secure that onto the spindle with a slip knot. Then I tie a little loop at the other end and catch the end of my fiber in that loop having it long enough so it reaches back onto itself.

It sounds like you are having a problem with your drafting. This too is a very common problem that beginners have, don't worry it will all work out eventually. Lots of people with pre-draft their fibers so it will be easier to get the drafting consistent. I don't have time right now to go into drafting or pre-drafting but I bet someone will be along who does have the time. You can also try searching Google for pre-drafting or drafting tips. Make sure you put in hand spinning and pre-drafting or drafting otherwise you may end up with a bunch of architectural tips.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok I have tried many more times and I am almost out of the practice wool that came with the set...grr... I can get the wool to spin in to a twisted mess... it twists so much the it makes the spindle not want to spin forward only backspin and it bunches up if and when I can get it to spin forwards.... What am I doing wrong?????
 

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Try checking the videos at I can spin.com
http://www.ispindle.com/toc.htm

Check out Park & Draft spinning and Pre-Drafting Fiber

These two skills will help you to maximize your yarn yield and have better control of your spinning until you can build up your speed. Pre-drafting is actually a good thing to do for good results most of the time.

Have a good day!
Franco Rios
 

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When you spin it to the point that you think there is enough twist you need to then wind it onto the spindle then spin another little bit and put that on the spindle and repeat, until you have the spindle full with your new yarn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is what the wool looks like when I am trying to spin it. I have tried the pre-drafting... so here is the picture.

 

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Bless your heart. I know it is so frustrating at first---all thumbs and no fingers and it doesn't help a bit that you have no one to show you. Is there a yarn shop anywhere near that you could ask if there's anyone that spins? It is so much easier if you could see it done (even just once), but you can self-teach, just takes more determination. I hope you don't get too frustrated and give up. It looks like you are just having trouble controlling your drafting (normal). Keep at it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ok, Thanks! the closest yarn store is over a hour away...but I am going to ask a lady at our church tomorrow if she has ever used one, hopefully she has. This is some that I did last night.. It is really twisted, I wet it down and hung it with weight at one end(I saw how to on a website..)and it is a little better but not a whole lot.




 

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Cowgirl, what you've done so far is not bad at all! If you divide it in half and ply the two strands together (spinning the spindle in the opposite direction) you'll probably find that it's a lot less twisty. Plying actually takes some of the twist out of the already spun yarn. Keep it up, and you'll be a good spindler in no time!
 

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All that looks like you have a great handle on what you are doing. Absolutely nothing wrong with any of it. Keep plugging away and you will have it down in no time. Just keep in mind that once you begin to spin fine even yarn you will have a very difficult time spinning the chunky uneven stuff ever again. That is considered a novelty yarn as it is now and very desirable to many people. You should hang onto that first skein of yarn as a reminder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thnak you guys for all your help!!!
 

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That wool is an awesome start! You see how in that first picture it twists back on itself? That is one way to see what it'll look like after it is plyed - singles usually do that twist-up thing, because they are a bit overspun ... they have to be, so that when you ply them with themselves again, you get a balanced yarn. If it kinda kinks back just once, like that, folds over itself to look like a 2 ply yarn, then it'll do well when plyed ... if it goes all crazy and twists on itself over and over and just makes a lump, well, then the single is overspun and you might wanna untwist it a bit.

It's possible to make singles that don't do that twist-on-themselves thing (and knit with them) but they tend to be very loosely spun, not much more than lightly twisted rovings ... they are neat for highly feltable wool, you knit with it then full it and it makes felt out of the knitted fabric, but they can be hard to work with 'cause they pull apart easily. Something to try in the future!

You're off to a great start ... just keep on practicing, and gradually you'll be able to make a thinner and more even draft, and you won't be able to do this again if you try!
 
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