droopy ears?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by wizzard, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. wizzard

    wizzard future nomad

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    one of my younger bunnies has one ear that only stands up when he is alert. at other times it hangs down like a flop. i wouldnt think this would be a sign of a problem, but i thought i should get on here and check anyways. all the other bunnies with it are showing no similar signs.
    so is it anything?
     
  2. nehimama

    nehimama An Ozark Engineer Supporter

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    What breed are these bunnies? I'm wondering if there aren't some lop-ear genes in the mix somewhere? Or, perhaps the little one is a bit young, and the ear will eventually stand when he's/she's older?

    Just a few ideas.

    NeHi Mama
     

  3. TerriA

    TerriA Well-Known Member

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    I raise "wooly" breeds.. and am on several email lists that have addressed this problem during the summer months. There seems to be 2 schools of thought....

    1) "summer ear" when growing rabbits need the extra cooling action of the larger ears and the cartilidge holding the ears up does not grow fast enough to hold up all the extra blood vessels, etc needed... the ear "droops". Some breeders refuse to breed during the late spring/summer for this reason...

    Then there are other breeders who believe it to be a genetic problem...

    2) genetics. Some "lines" are just more prone to flop down but especially in the summer due to the above reasons. I have one rabbit whose ear was flopped when I bought it (ever see a lopped angora? Cute... but... <G>). When asking a well respected breeder about its blood lines, I was told that the ggsire was well known to pass on that problem to their offspring.. not ALL of them but enough to make one wonder...

    So I am sitting here wondering what to do with this little guy. Personally, if there are known genetic faults, I have come to the realization that in order to "better the breed", it needs to NOT be bred. So many breeders think they need to make more money or breed nilly-willy instead of looking at the long term consequences of passing on those genetic traits. So I will probably end up using this buck as a wooler only for personal use. JUST to be sure... I think the jury is still "out" on whether or not it is genetic, but I don't want to take a chance... I would hate to have someone buy a rabbit from me and later on be unhappy in future breedings.

    I had some rabbits that I had to put down recently due to an unscrupulous breeder who didn't tell me the entire story of what they carried... many DQs were "hidden genetically" and only when I started breeding did they all start popping up... I do not want anyone else to have to suffer the heartache I did...

    You didn't say what breed you have.. if you have lops, then I would just give it a bit more time to see if both ears "flop".. if you have a non-lop, then "I" would not breed it.. you could sell as "pet quality" to someone if you have the market for it, but I would be up front and tell whoever bought it that it MIGHT be a genetic fault and should not be bred...

    My .01 for the morning <G>

    Terri
     
  4. wizzard

    wizzard future nomad

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    i was not told the breed of this rabbit. its about 10 weeks old i think. i beleive its a dutch. but when grown it is a very small amount larger than my other dutch, but this could be because of different lines, etc.... as long as its nothing to worry about, i wont worry about it. im breeding them for my own personal meat production, none will be sold. so it will not be a problem. thanx for the input