Drive point well?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Cyngbaeld, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I was thinking of doing a drive point well since the soil here is sandy. So I started digging to see if it was sandy for very far and hit some hard clay. No rocks but the clay is very dry and hard. Couldn't even dig thru it. Is there a drive point that will go thru clay? OR should I just give it up and try to save up $ for a drilled well?

    I'm supposed to be on the community well and have a share in it, but it doesn't seem feasible to hook up to it and don't really care to be imbroiled in the squabbling, if you know what I mean. And I have a cistern but no rain for a long time around here. The grass goes crunch because it is so hot and dry.
     
  2. brosil

    brosil Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Good question. I hope someone has a lot of info on drive points. I want to put one in for garden and backup stock irrigation. We've got city water but it gets pricey.
     

  3. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    Are you sure you can legally put one in? Many subdivisions that have a community well also have deed restrections that do not allow individual wells. Usually something that the zoning board required when allow the place to be divided up.
     
  4. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Nope, no regs here. The original owners just didn't want to drill more wells than they were required to by Texas State law so they put the max number of lots on one well. Think there are eleven lots on this one. No home owners associations either.
     
  5. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The driven wells like you want were all we had around here until the last 10 or 15 years when they made them unlawfull to drive them. We can't find a well man who will do it. They all drill the wells now. Driving one yourself is hard to do in clay if you need to go over about 30 feet. It's no picnic in sand. You have to have the pipe cut in lengths about 6 feet long so you can use a weight on a tripod to drop on them and pound them into the ground. A short stub is kept at the top so you don't jimmy up the threads on the lengths you are pushing down. If you can't find someone who knows how its done the odds are stacked against you.
     
  6. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    DRIVEN wells are often hard to do in clay soils, But you can do it. Dig as deep as you can first and make it big enough to hold some water and keep lots of water to lubricate the way down. Do like UncleWill says and use short 5 or 6 foot pieces of pipe-2inch galvanized pipe is common. Put a cap over the threads and use a steel post driver and start working. It takes a lot of hard, short hits and you just keep on going by adding another coupling and length of pipe when you get near the ground.
     
  7. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Before I started driving a well point through clay, I'd want to get an idea of how deep that clay runs before you hit some kind of aquifer. In Minnesota, the Health Department provides all well and boring records for any location in the state. We can get this information very easily on-line.

    What type of pump are you planning on using?
     
  8. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Why not wash it down?? Or do this for instance---get a 20ft piece of 1" Sch 40 pvc----fix you a adapter to fit your garden hose(also use 2 90's so the hose is hanging straight down) hook your garden hose to it----Stand it straight up in the hole you got dug/started------Let the water pressure wash/drill you a hole 20ft deep--Add more pipe to get to the depth you want----then you can pull it back out and should be able to drive your well point alot easier. Just my thoughts.

    I always wash mine down by using 3" pvc, then when I get to the water depth/stream----I drop 2" pvc with screen on the bottom inside the 3" and wash the 3" back up leaving the 2" in the dirt. This works good in my area-----Put down several in the 50ft depth, but we have little to no rocks---Just alot of HARD Clay. I always take a saw and knotch the bottom of the 3" into a saw-tooth look---It helps cut through the hard clay by working the pipe back and forth. Good Luck. If you want more info on this--Just ask!! Randy
     
  9. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I don't have any water except for the cistern which is nearly dry because of the drought unless I haul it from a neighbor's well. I did pour some water in the hole and let it set over nite and was able to scrape a franction of an inch off the bottom. So I poured in more water and let it set. 5 days later it was still setting and really had not softened up any to speak of.
     
  10. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Haven't decided on a pump yet.

    Not sure where to find the info on wells. I was told there is no record but find that a bit hard to believe. Well company that drilled around here seems to have gone out of business.
     
  11. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Ya know, that clay may be 100's of feet thick. I'd ask around to find out what I can. After pounding that drive point a few dozen feet, you're gonna be wasted and wanna quit. All that time. effort and money will be wasted. Find out what soil layers you have and their thicknesses BEFORE you get started.
     
  12. Tweetybird

    Tweetybird Well-Known Member

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    Years ago we drove a point well for our livestock. The area we were living was very sandy and had clay, but aren't the depths you deal with in Texas, very deep? The driving does wear you out, but how we did it was each one of us kids would take turns giving the others a rest, while one was driving. It takes a while to drive and you need patience and determination to do it.
    The one we drove was about 15-20 feet deep, not like the deep wells it seems you folks out in Texas need.
    As far as soil and hydrolgic survays are concerned, I would check with your local extension service. They will have maps, and some of the Universities in the area might have some of the information. I would check with their geology department and see what they have.
    I would also Google point wells and see what comes up. I will do it and see what comes up and see if there is anything helpful there.
     
  13. raymilosh

    raymilosh Well-Known Member

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    All good advice so far. I have hand driven wells for research purposes and learned that when driving in the well, it will stop going down as fast, no mater how much you hit it. the solution is to put a pipe wrench on the pipe and turn it around, that screws the sections together, so they don't absorb the shock and it also will turn the drive point around at the bottom. the drive points aren't round like a funnel, but have many faces. when turned around, the faces will push the soil out of the way and allow you to advance further. You may find that you need to turn the pipe frequently...like every few inches of advancement.
    also if the soil is dry, it will be harder to drive the well. keep the soil full of water as much as you can.
    As far as estimating the depth you'll have to go before finding water...do your homework as already suggested. Ask a local driller if they know how deep it is to the first water table in your area...they will definately know. They hit it while drilling to deeper sources.
    If there is a perrenial (always flowing) stream or river in your area, know that it is fed by groundwater and that you will have to go no deeper than the elevation of that stream to hit water.
    good luck with the whole project.
    ray
     
  14. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    OK--After you find out how deep that clay is and want to continue-------Get a pump----Gas if you have no electric----Rent one if you need-------dig a hole a couple feet away from your well location---2 to 3 ft square/round will be good-------then dig a second hole about the same size or bigger a couple feet away from that one---------a shovel wide trench from well to first hole----you want water to move from first hole to second hole as 1st hole over flows, but you want this water to go through a pipe or something so there is no washout between hole 1 and 2---this will keep the water cleaner, set your pump up to draw out of hole 2, you can make a screen wire filter if you want------fill hole 2 with water---pump into wash down pipe as earlier described in above postong, water will wash back out of well hole into hole 1---dirt will settle them water will flow into hole 2 and be repumped-------You will have to stop and clean mud out of hole 1 ever now and then. Don't take alot of water this way, maybe a couple of barrels if you are lucky. Then you can drive your point----Unless you decide to do as I do--------And wash the whole thing down. Good Luck!!! Randy
     
  15. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Thanks, all. Looks like I will need to try to find someone who knows something here. Least I know which direction to look and what questions to ask now. And if I decide to try to drive the well will certainly use all the tips from you guys.
     
  16. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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  17. ltbloom

    ltbloom Well-Known Member

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    Cyngbaeld,
    I was thinking along the same lines, a drive point well sounds on paper like it's pretty easy to do. Have you made any more attempts?
    I found this map:

    http://www.virdelldrilling.com/images/land resource map.jpg

    and I'm wondering how accurate it is. Can you pinpont your location and see if that's the kind of soil that you seem to have?

    I appear to be in a Rs1 zone( have to enlarge the map to be sure! ),should not be too difficult to get it drilled!