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Discussion Starter #1
I am working on a project where I am bolting to sections of 4 x 4 pressure treated wood posts together using 1/2" carriage bolts. Some of the wood is very hard to drill through while the first part went relatively well. I have to repeatedly stop to let the drill cool down as I can drill just a little in and then back the bit out again. Is this typical of pressure treated wood? Is there an easier way to make the holes? I have a 1/2" ships auger bit that is brand new as of yesterday and I first tried using the cordless drill (worked on the first four holes OK) and now I am using a corded drill and fighting to get every hole drilled for the most part (cordless will not work on these, either).

Ken in Glassboro, NJ :)
 

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Since you are useing 1/2 inch holes use a spade bit. They are long enough to drill through a 4x4 and they wount dull like the dril you have.
 

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Thanks guys -- I tried it and it works -- have to use an extension to get through both posts together so the holes line up but the spade bit works much better !!! Now if someone would just turn down the outdoor air temps. a little I could really get some work done....

Ken in Glassboro, NJ :)
 

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morrowsmowers said:
Thanks guys -- I tried it and it works -- have to use an extension to get through both posts together so the holes line up but the spade bit works much better !!! Now if someone would just turn down the outdoor air temps. a little I could really get some work done....

Ken in Glassboro, NJ :)
....................Try drilling a pilot hole like a 1\8 inch , first . Then your bigger bit will go right on thru . , fordy
 

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Thats MR. Redneck to you
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you can get 'speed bits' (brand name) in long lengths! A 1/2" hole is nothing for a decent drill to pull, not knocking your drill by any means! A sharp speed bit is great, I don't think the newer ones could be easily sharpend like the old ones were (flat cutting surface + light touch on a grinder = NEW AGAIN) but they are FAST and easy, and pretty cheap.
 

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restoring and showing antique oilfield engines is one of my hobbies....8,ooo to 15,000 lb units..the skids i mount most on entails drilling 6 to 8 - 1" holes down though three feet of white oak. the spade drill with an extended shank is my choice,,,,the drill can be had very cheaply, easy to field sharpen. just clear the sawdust as you drill.
 
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