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Anyone use these to feed their goats? If so, what do you think of them. If not, why not?
 

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I don't use them, but I know farmers who do, for goats and cows. They are a good source of protein and TDN. To me, it all depends on the price, and how economical it is compared to other feedstuffs.

I wouldn't ever use the wet mash, it puts on too much flab, but most importantly it destroys teeth.

Here's something the Corn Growers Assn. put out on it:

http://ncga.com/livestock/PDFs/DistillersGrainsBooklet.pdf
 

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Hi DR! It's been FOREVER, and I owe you a great big email. : ) I just saw your post, and wanted to let you know that Eric F. feeds his goats distillers. He just did a seminar at the field day in Douds a couple of weeks ago. It isn't really easy for the small producer to do it, and Eric has a system worked out with a neighbor. He can tell you lots more about it.

It's not for me, but if a producer can make it work, more power to 'em.

T
 

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I was wondering what the ethanol producers were planning on doing with all that leftover mash. :shrug:

Another question.... or two...

The aflatoxin is going to be a HUGE problem with this year's corn crop in South Texas. Are the ethanol plants going to take tainted corn without penalty to the farmer? Will mash from an ethanol plant that is using tainted corn harm livestock?

Inquiring minds..... :help:
 

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Some mash goes direct to the farmer and is fed wet. I'd stay away from it, it rots teeth. Cattlefolks here are finding out!

Some is dried, and this is good to use, as I said, depending on cost for protein and tdn compared to other feeds.

Aflatoxin is not a huge problem for distilling, so no troubles there. They'll take it. I would imagine the process will kill it, as it involves heat.

I actually read yesterday about a meat goat farmer successfully feeding 50% chicken litter and 50% grain to his Boers. So what is economical and acceptable to the goats is only limited by our own minds. I feed mine browse, grass, hay and cottonseed, in that order. The cost increases in that order, and the amount fed decreases. They get nothing but browse and grass 7 months a year. Even in the dead of winter, they are limit-fed the cottonseed to what they can eat in 10 minutes.
 
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