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Any ideas what to check for when the battery on the car is drawing down over a period of time? First it's a 95 chevy sub with all of the options. I removed the battery bolts and changed them, and cleaned the wire ends, and I took the altenator in and it passed the test. The battery that was in it first, was new, and I changed it back to the old battery that was in it, and it worked for 2 weeks before starting the whole process over again. Any ideas will be put to the test.
 

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Hook up a meter on the battery, then pull and replace fuses, read the meter between each circuit. That will tell you which circuit has the currant leakage.
 

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I am not as familiar with all the newer rigs computer sensors, but the owner of the wrecking yard i work at from time to time bought a trail blazer [so it was newer] that had all the options and one of the electric window motors needed replaced, which left the computer to thinking it was able to be broke into, and it kept the computer alarm mechanism on full time, running the battery down every two days..... needless to say it took calling the factory to figure this all out cause when you do as Mitch sez, pull fuses, and check circuts some of them are left on by various back up routes [redunancy?] anyhow IF the computer has the ability to arm an alarm in that year, and you have something not letting the computer turn off, then you MAY find that to be your problem....

William
 

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mdharris68 said:
Any ideas what to check for when the battery on the car is drawing down over a period of time? First it's a 95 chevy sub with all of the options. I removed the battery bolts and changed them, and cleaned the wire ends, and I took the altenator in and it passed the test. The battery that was in it first, was new, and I changed it back to the old battery that was in it, and it worked for 2 weeks before starting the whole process over again. Any ideas will be put to the test.
Quick things to check on a 95 Suburban are the visor vanity mirrors and the glove box light. Also common for the interior lights to stay on as the door panel sometimes doesn't push the switch all of the way. They make spacers to go under the little button on the door panel to shim it out furthur to push the plunger on the switch.

Now that's the short cheater version of a fix. Now to diagnose properly you will need a digital multi meter that reads amperage down to milliamps. You need to hook the amp meter in line of the negative battery cable and measure the amperage draw and then pull fuses to isolate the circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Beeman said:
Quick things to check on a 95 Suburban are the visor vanity mirrors and the glove box light. Also common for the interior lights to stay on as the door panel sometimes doesn't push the switch all of the way. They make spacers to go under the little button on the door panel to shim it out furthur to push the plunger on the switch.

Now that's the short cheater version of a fix. Now to diagnose properly you will need a digital multi meter that reads amperage down to milliamps. You need to hook the amp meter in line of the negative battery cable and measure the amperage draw and then pull fuses to isolate the circuit.
My multimeter has a clamp on amp meter that reads DC amperage. Would I just clamp it over the negative cable and go from there? Or is there another way to check amperage on a vehicle?
 

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mdharris68 said:
My multimeter has a clamp on amp meter that reads DC amperage. Would I just clamp it over the negative cable and go from there? Or is there another way to check amperage on a vehicle?
You need to be able to measure in milliamps. I would use the inductive clamp to start with as you might have enough draw depending on what's drawing current. Clamp your meter on a battery cable and open a door or turn the lights on to see what you get, you'll see if it's picking it up and what you're readings are and go from there.
 

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Hey.

Check the belt that drives the alternator for looseness or wear. Also, how old is battery? A battery will start to hold less of a charge when it begins going downhill.

RF
 
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