DRAFT Safe Plant List for Rabbits

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by MaggieJ, Jul 4, 2007.

  1. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Jul 19, 2003
    Here's a list of safe foods a friend gave me. She's used this list for several years and claims it's dependable. - when starting rabbits on a natural feeding program go slow so the gut flora can adapt to the new feeds you are feeding your rabbits.

    RABBIT SAFE FRUIT-

    (Feed very, very sparingly… Super sugary! Up to 2 tbsp daily)

    Apple (NO core or anything containing seeds, unless all seeds removed)
    Apricots (NO PITS)
    Banana (fruit and peel)
    Blackberry (stem, leaf and fruit)
    Blueberries
    Carambola
    Cherry (NO PITS)
    Cranberry
    Currant (black and red)
    Cucumber
    Grapes (fruit, leaf and vine are edible)
    Huckleberry
    Kiwi Fruit
    Mango
    Nectarine
    Orange (NO PEEL- segments only)
    Melon (all melons)
    Papaya (NO SEEDS)
    Peach (NO PITS)
    Pear
    Pineapple
    Plum (NO PITS)
    Raspberries (twigs, and leaves – astringent)
    Rose hip
    Starfruit
    Strawberries (and leaves)
    Tomato (red fruit ONLY; no stems or leaves)
    Tangerine (NO PEEL – segments only)
    Watermelon


    RABBIT SAFE VEGETABLES-

    Alfalfa Sprouts
    Artichoke Leaves
    Arugula
    Asparagus
    Baby Sweet Corns (like in stirfry)***
    Beet Greens
    Beetroot
    Bell Peppers (green, yellow, red, orange…)
    Bok Choy/Pak Choy
    Carrot Greens (tops)
    Carrot (limited amount, due to high sugar content)
    Celeriac
    Celery (cut into small pieces to limit choking on strings)
    Cucumber
    Chard
    Chicory Greens (aka Italian Dandelion)
    Clover (WHITE only)
    Collard Greens (be cautious, may cause bladder sludge (high calcium)
    Dandelion Greens (no pesticides)
    Eggplant (purple fruit only; leaves toxic)
    Endive
    Escarole
    Grass (if cut from your own chemical/fertilizer/poison free yard - can dry like hay)
    Kale
    Lettuce (Dark Green/Red Leaf, Butter, Boston, Bibb, or Romaine – NO ICEBERG [no nutritional value, may cause diarrhea])
    Mustard Spinach
    Nappa/Chinese Cabbage
    Okra Leaves
    Pak Choy/Bok Choy
    Pumpkin
    Radicchio
    Radish tops (Limited amounts: can cause gas)
    Raspberry Leaves
    Rhubarb (RED STALKS ONLY – POISONOUS LEAF)
    Squash: Yellow, Butternut, Pumpkin, Zucchini
    Swiss Chard
    Turnip Greens
    Watercress
    Wheat Grass
    Zucchini

    SAFE IN MODERATION:

    Broccoli
    Brussels Sprouts
    Cabbage
    Cauliflower
    Kale
    Mustard Greens
    Spinach
    SAFE FOODS:

    Agrimony
    Alfalfa
    Apple
    Avens
    Balm
    Banana
    Barley
    Basil
    Beetroot
    Blackberry
    Borage
    Broccoli
    Buckwheat
    Burnet
    Camomile
    Caraway
    Carrot
    Celery
    Celeriac
    Chervil
    Chicory
    Chickweed
    Chinese leaf
    Cleavers
    Clover, WHITE
    Coltsfoot
    Comfrey-I feed fresh young leaves and also dry for winter tonic, but most breeders say they feed it slighty wilted
    Coriander
    Corn marigold
    Corn spurrey
    Cow parsnip
    Crosswort
    Cucumber
    Dandelion
    Dead-Nettles
    Dill
    Dock BEFORE FLOWERING
    Endive
    Fat hen
    Fennel
    Goosefoot
    Goosegrass
    Goutweed BEFORE FLOWERING
    Ground elder BEFORE FLOWERING
    Hawkbit
    Hawkweed
    Heather
    Hedge parsley
    Horseradish
    Jerusalem artichoke
    Knapweed
    Knotgrass
    Kohlrabi
    Lavender
    Lovage
    Mallow
    Marjoram
    Mayweed
    Maywort
    Meadowsweet
    Melon
    Milk thistle
    Mugwort
    Nipplewort
    Oats
    Orache
    Oxeye daisy
    Parsley
    Parsnip
    Peas
    Pear
    Peppermint
    Pigweed
    Plantain
    Pumpkin
    Purslane
    Radish GREENS
    Raspberry
    Sage
    Savory
    Sanfoin
    Shepherd’s purse
    Silverweed
    Sow thistle
    Soya
    Strawberry
    Swiss Chard
    Tare
    Tomatoes(fruit only leaves and stocks toxic!)
    Trefoil
    Vetch
    Vine leaves
    Watercress
    Watermelon
    Wheat
    Yarrow


    SAFE TREE AND SHRUB LEAVES - only fresh young leaves:

    Acacia
    Apple
    Beech
    Birch
    Blackberry
    Cherry
    Hazel
    Horse Chestnut
    Lime
    Mountain Ash
    Mulberry
    Pear
    Poplar (not black)
    Raspberry
    Strawberry

    SAFE TWIGS-

    Apple
    Birch
    Blackberry
    Fir
    Hazel
    Hawthorn
    Maple
    Pear
    Raspberry
    Spruce
    Willow

    SAFE FLOWERS-

    Aster
    Carnation
    Daisy
    Geranium
    Geum
    Helenium
    Hollyhock
    Honesty
    Marguerite
    Marigold
    Michaelmas daisy
    Nasturtium
    Rose
    Stock
    Sunflower

    SAFE HERBS-

    Basil: Lemon, Globe, Thai, Mammoth, Sweet, Genevieve
    Borage
    Camomile
    Caraway
    Clover
    Chervil
    Comfrey
    Coriander/Cilantro
    Dill: Fernleaf, Mammoth
    Fennel
    Garden Cress
    Groundsel
    Lavender (Not for pregnant does; can cause fetal expulsion)
    Lemon Balm
    Lovage
    Marjoram
    Mint: Pineapple sage, pineapple mint, apple mint, orange mint, peppermint, lemon thyme, cinnamon basil, lime basil, lemon basil, sweet basil, licorice basil, “licorice mint” (anise hyssop), spearmint, peppermint, chocolate mint, and basil mint.
    Oregano
    Peppermint
    Parsley: Curly and Flat-Leaf
    Rosemary
    Sage: Pineapple is quite good
    Salad Burnet / Small Burnet
    Summer Savory
    Tarragon
    Thyme
     
  2. SVCostanzo

    SVCostanzo Member

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    Missouri
    Thanks for the list. I want to let my rabbits graze and plan on setting up a pasture like the one I am setting up for my chickens. I found plenty on "rabbit proof" plants but many are toxic! This is a great resource.
     

  3. TexasHillbilly

    TexasHillbilly New Member

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    Jan 27, 2012
    well mine love sweet potato slips and vines (they are from the morning glory) so does the local wild rabbits they eat two hundred hills out of my garden this last week they must be good.
     
  4. Caldhara

    Caldhara New Member

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    Name is Streptopus amplexifolius, member of the lily family...they are yummy for me but what about for the rabbits? I couldn't find any info...
     
  5. scarlet812

    scarlet812 Well-Known Member

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    I think from what I've seen mentioned, it is okay to give plantain with seed stalks included, but I wanted to be sure. One mention was worded "above ground parts," so may I interpret that as including the seed stalks? Thanks!
     
  6. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday a friend told me that her rabbits love watermelon. Today I picked up a melon for my rabbits and will see if they enjoy munching on a cold piece of it tomorrow. I want to let it get chilled all the way to the center before I give it to them.

    As for the seeds in the stalks, they are above ground and if it says everything above ground is safe, I would assume that includes stalks and seeds in the stalks.

    Any time I introduce a new food, I try it out on a cheap "junk rabbit" before giving it to the breeders. I don't want to lose any rabbit, but if one goes do to misinformation about a safe food, I'd rather it be one that was headed to freezer camp than one headed for a show to win grand champion.
     
  7. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It may have been my list (at the beginning of this thread) that states "above ground parts" for plantain. Certainly I have often given them the seed stalks along with with leaves and have never had any ill effects from them. Generally speaking, however, it is a good idea to leave seed stalks to mature and ripen so you get plenty more plants for next year.
     
  8. jimmy588

    jimmy588 Well-Known Member

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    @MaggieJ any info on cedar chips for nest box's?
     
  9. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm no expert on wood shavings for rabbit nest boxes, but my understanding is that cedar wood gives off potentially harmful vapours. Red cedar is worse than white cedar in this regard--much more aromatic. Aspen shavings are better than cedar and I think most hardwoods are safe. A layer of wood shavings in the bottom of the box help to absorb urine, but I would want straw or hay on top of that.