DR power mower?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by deberosa, Jan 19, 2004.

  1. deberosa

    deberosa SW Virginia Gourd Farmer!

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    Dec 13, 2003
    Location:
    Floyd County, VA
    Been looked at one of these (the 11 HP) to clear the small trailing blackberries, scotch broom and tall grass on my property - can anybody tell me if they are worth it? I have 4.5 acres. Been tackling it with a push mower but need help!!! Even putting in a perimeter fence for goats is a challenge until I get the brush down! Would like to putting walking paths through the woods also - just to enjoy it a bit!

    Are they fairly easy to control? ( I have used rear tine tillers and can control them just fine). I imaging the Briggs and Straton engine is a good one...

    Any advice would be great. Thanks!
     
  2. Rita

    Rita Well-Known Member Supporter

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    May 13, 2002
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Hi, We have had our DR mower for 5 years and it is really some machine. It amazes me the size of the saplings it will devour. I have never used it but my husband (age 72) even uses it on a very very steep hill. We also have a power wagon and it's great too but because of not having a choke it is hard to start but I understand they have a different system now. Hope this helps. Rita
     

  3. jenzden

    jenzden Active Member

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    Sep 28, 2003
    Location:
    eastern OH
    If you don't have to cut anything such as small saplings then the DR might be more than you need. When we moved to our property 7 years ago we bought a Craftsman (don't remember what the name of it is!). Anyway, what it is is a heavy duty weed whacker on wheels. It has large wheels with a lawnmower type engine (cost us about $300). It doesn't use that thin trimmer line like regular weed whackers. It uses 1/4 inch plastic pieces of line. (Sorry I just can't remember what they call them for some reason). It has been very dependable. The only repair we have made to it is just to replace the round cover underneath.
    I love this machine! It is easier to run than a lawn mower because of the big wheels. It cuts thru the heaviest brush, grass and weeds. It doesn't work on saplings or roots though. I try to run this thing on at least once per year on the trails thru the woods. For the fields I run it once in the beginning in the season over the whole trail and then just on the edges occasionally. Once you have your trail thru a field you can usually just keep that maintained with a mower. I usually do trail maintenance such as sapling removal by just taking a walk carrying the pruner now and then.
    I'm afraid you will spend way too much on the DR and then when you have made your trails etc. then you won't have much use for it anymore. I guess it really depends on what it is you need to clear and maintain.
    It is so easy to use that once I start using it I begin to make our yard bigger and bigger and the hubby says "That's enough!"

    Jen
     
  4. deberosa

    deberosa SW Virginia Gourd Farmer!

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2003
    Location:
    Floyd County, VA
    Thanks! I have one of those Sears trimmers that I have been using - was wondering if the DR would be worth it. The trimmer doesn't do well on the scotch broom (but I don't have alot of it) and the thicker blackberries (but I whacked most of those down alread). Sounds like maybe I should rent one to get everything down and then use the trimmer to keep it up. I don't have that many saplings any more - been busy with loppers. :)

    I just wish my Sears trimmer had power driven wheels, gets tiring pushing it all the time.

     
  5. Polly in NNY

    Polly in NNY Well-Known Member

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    May 10, 2002
    We have rented a DR, 11hp for $45/day. With six of us taking turns running it we can clear a lot of land in a day. If you don't have a continual use for one that would be my suggestion. We rented to evaluate whether or not we wanted to purchase one. We have 106 acres to use one on and the kids have a great potential for hiring out once our work is done.