Doing a progect (arch class) need types of houses....alt. prefered)

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Graceless, Aug 23, 2006.

  1. Graceless

    Graceless Gypsy in ALabama

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    So my list so far (by the request of the instructor)
    Cordwood
    Strawbale
    Monolithic Dome

    Thinking of a couple of others but as always Being unique and living up to that is what is expected of my work soooo
    Tell me some types of houses that I may not have heard of!
    I was going to do Earthshelter/ship but that* is in the arch book so it takes the fum out! sigh:)

    LMK ! you've all been around the block and seen/had some great ideas :)
     
  2. beorning

    beorning Well-Known Member

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    Cob
    Slip form concrete/stone
    Sod
    Adobe


    Can't think of more right now, maybe after the coffee. :)
     

  3. floramum

    floramum Well-Known Member

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    Are You Studying Archaeology Or Architecture?

    There Are Cave Shelters, Chickee Huts, Wickiups...tents...bunkers....
     
  4. Graceless

    Graceless Gypsy in ALabama

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    Architecture but am going to use historical examples such as rammed earth and cob..
    I want something that is unique not the first few sites that you come to using the words (alternitive non-traditional and such since everyone is doing this progect as well...:)but I have a head start:) I know a few more styles and terms to use in searching:)
    LOL! I just found a local house done by Auburn University made out of recycled carpet squares LOL!!!

    Hmm Recycled houses???
     
  5. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like a yurt, myself.
     
  6. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    Structural insulated panels
    Prefabricated

    And if you google, I know I found some really interesting stuff under "temporary housing solutions": things like the Teeny Tiny House, some very neat domey type things that go up fast, houses that are transportable (meant for things like postKatrina) ....

    And I saw one project done by a school class that built a house from old yellow pages!
     
  7. BigBoy

    BigBoy No attitude here...

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    Concrete block using the usual mortored stack method and then there is the dry-stack method which is super strong.
    Pole (post) frame building... also very strong.
     
  8. Indrananda

    Indrananda Member

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    there was a guy who made a house all out of newspaper rolled up into tiny bundles and schlacked...
    Papercrete/padobe/fidobe
    earthbag
    living roof
    underground
    just a few not mentioned...

    Indy-
    SilverGirlsHubby
     
  9. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    tires and glass bottles too
     
  10. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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    Here's one I haven't seen mentioned, but I don't know what it's called -- I read about it years ago, and it's been sitting in the back of my mind ever since. It was used I think primarily in the north of Scotland, where trees are scarce, and stone plentiful, and it MAY be the method used to construct the Black Houses (houses with no windows and a central hearth with no chimney).

    The houses were no more than fourteen feet wide (inside measurement), and maybe twice that long. The walls were about three feet thick at the bottom, tapering to about two feet thick at the top. They were constructed basically as two dry-laid stone walls, with compacted earth and rubble inbetween. The interior stone wall was vertical, the outside one sloped up, and the stone used was somewhat flat, and laid with a slight slope to the outside so water would run off rather than into the walls. If I was to build one, I'd plaster the interior walls, and put a few windows in, as well as a chimney for a masonry stove (which could be built in similar fashion to the house, only not so thick).

    The roof was either fairly steep and thatched, or fairly shallow and earth-covered, with sod on top.

    So if you can find out more about this house style, I'd be glad to learn more! :)

    Kathleen
     
  11. RollrXGirl

    RollrXGirl Member

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    You mentioned Monolithic Dome, how about Geodesic? Check out Buckminster Fuller's work for some great info.
     
  12. Indrananda

    Indrananda Member

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    Oh, oh, I know of a guy making houses out of cardboard... temporary housing, but actual houses. He was at 'burning man' a few years ago; they might have an archive for you to look at... There's a guy in texas who built his house out of 5 steel storage/transport containers, like the ones the use to haul stuff in on those LARGE ships... Laid them side by side, cut out doors, windows and bermed the whole thing under, like, 12 tons of dirt. Crafty bugger. Cost him like $10K for a 2000 ft2 house...

    I'm a nerd for alternative/oddball housing... have been since I was a kid... My current idea for our house, well, still makes my wife cringe at times :D

    Indy
     
  13. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

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  14. CatsPaw

    CatsPaw Who...me?

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    well, my mushroom house has been floating around for awhile in my head.

    I always wondered about using a steel superstructure, then welding/attaching rebar all over it bent to organic forms then covered with lathe and gunnite (as in pool concrete shot onto it.) as long as you kept the balance fairly even and the superstructure was solid, you could pretty much shape things anyway you wanted.
     
  15. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ok How about Timber Frame buildings?