dog teeth tartar question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Ann Mary, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi, my lab/chesapeake has terrible tartar. She is 4 years old and on a dry, non-corn dog food and I supplement her with good vitamins. I give her Pet Kiss tartar remover in her water now but that's expensive. Anyone know what homeade remedy I can try? The second ingredient in the Pet Kiss is zinc. Anyone know more about that? Is it maybe her body Ph and I need to give her baking soda or vinegar to balance that? Thanks for the help!
    Ann Mary

    Thanks everyone for the tips but I should have stated that she isn't a chewer. She doesnt chew on anything! :( She is a high energy dog and won't sit still for a brushing. That's why I was hoping someone had an idea about her ph or an ingredient that I can add to her water. I'll keep looking. The Barf diet is a good thing but I am not able to do it fully. She does get alot of table scraps like left over veggies and she LOVES raw carrots. Hard to decide sometimes who will get the scraps, her or the chickens! :)
     
  2. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

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    You don't mention anything about brushing your dog's teeth, and that's the single most important thing you can do to prevent tartar.
     

  3. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    Give her some real raw large beef bones that she really has to chew. That keeps my dogs' teeth shiny (one is seven years old now).
     
  4. Dances In Woods

    Dances In Woods Well-Known Member

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    Your Vet can clean their teeth. i just had my BCfemale done. She had plaque build up that brushing wouldn't get off. The Vet sedated her and popped it off with a instrument then I guess they cleaned the rest of her teeth.

    :dance: Now...she has no bad breath at all. Very worth it..only $50
     
  5. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You have to brush the teeth, or at the very least, vigorously wipe them with a coarse rag with baking soda on it.

    My Buster is pretty good about this, but I've been tending to his teeth since he was a pup. My last dog, George (yellow lab), would let me crack the tartar off his teeth but HATED brushing (hence the rag/baking soda routine).

    If your dog is in reasonably good health, a cleaning at the vet is a good idea. They can either use hand tools or an ultrasonic cleaner, or both. That'll give you a fresh start on a shiny smile for your dog -- and prevent gum disease. (Dogs seldom get dental caries, i.e. rotten teeth.)


    Pony!
     
  6. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) I agree with the above advice re getting your dogs teeth cleaned. This will let you start with clean teeth and more importantly good health.

    I disagree completely with the statement by Pony that dogs seldom get rotten teeth. Of course they do and the Veterinary Profession sees it every day.

    Bad teeth that are not cared for don't just affect the jaws. They can lead to very bad systemic infections that have been known to infect the nasal passages, the blood stream and even heart tissues and lead to death.

    As to giving the dog "something to chew on" to correct the condition? If this worked I wonder why we must go to the dentist? LOL Some dogs take longer to develope this condition just as some people do. Everyone has different genetics, different weaknesses and different strengths.

    So, if your dog has developed tartar, see your Veterinarian and get it taken care of.

    Depending on the age of the dog, your Vet may want to do some preliminary blood work first before giving anesthetic. Take advantage of these advancments in medicine. They keep your dog safer. To do a proper job on the teeth and gums of your dog they should be asleep. That's the only way it can be done throughly.

    Anything else is just cosmetic.

    Good luck with things...LQ
     
  7. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

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    I was going to post these photos here, but I dont' have permission, so I'll just post the links....
    http://www.livejournal.com/community/rawdogs/106911.html

    Here's the dogs- http://www.livejournal.com/community/rawdogs/53539.html

    These are photos of the pets who are fed a BARF (biologically appropriate raw food) diet. BARF may or may not work, but the benefits of chewing for teeth cleaning are undeniable- after all, that's how wild animals keep their teeth and gums healthy.

    Having the teeth cleaned is not a bad idea. But proper chew things can prevent the need for them to be cleaned.

    One of the exceptions is old or very small dogs who are anything older than middle aged, as their tiny teeth tend not to be as firmly set in the jaw as larger dogs' teeth and they're very prone to premature loss.

    I highly recommend reading through the info and links on the RawDogs website.
     
  8. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm sorry if I wasn't sufficiently clear. Let me see if I can better explain my statement.

    All the years I worked as a veterinary technician, we rarely saw dental caries (cavities). Usually what happened is the gums were infected, and could no longer hold on to the tooth.

    So, technically, yes, a dog would lose teeth (especially the small breeds) but it did not start with the tooth itself rotting, but from the diseased gum.
     
  9. jillianjiggs

    jillianjiggs Well-Known Member

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    $50 for a cleaning? Sheesh...I paid $250 last year to have my dog's teeth cleaned, to pull a front tooth, and to give him antibiotics. We'll probably go and have it done again this year, because he doesn't like to sit there for brushing, and I have trouble remembering to do it.

    If you're having trouble brushing, the vet recommended brushing with some ice cream or peanut butter instead of doggie toothpaste for awhile. (my dog just tried to eat the brush, though) Chew toys and rawhides HELP...they aren't a replacement for brushing and/or cleanings.
     
  10. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :p Gotcha Pony! We didn't see cavities either, you are right on about the gums. It is important to keep them healthy.

    LQ ;)
     
  11. Mastiff

    Mastiff Well-Known Member

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    Barf works and the teeth stay clean... The real Wooly Mastiff has the whitest teeth... She loves her raw bones... chicken is her favorite...
    Our vet likes raw turkey necks for cleaning teeth for non barf dogs.
     
  12. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Chew "toys" are not the same as raw meaty bones (or raw unmeaty bones). I don't think anyone knows why chewing on appropriate bones cleans teeth so much better than rawhide or rope, but it does. Could be the chemical balance of the saliva changes? The balance of calcium, magnesium, etc in the bone?

    The bone should be sized to the dog, being too big to swallow. The dog should be able to make headway on the bone, so you should see teeth marks or a shrinking bone. If the bone is too hard for the dog, it can damage the teeth.

    Toss bone after three days because they dry out and become brittle.

    Raw Raw Raw. Never cooked.
     
  13. nostalgia

    nostalgia Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the above but since its teeth are pretty bad now, I would start with a good cleaning. We pay around 90.00 to have them cleaned and our vet recommends it at least every 4 years depending on how much you do brush and she chews. There are lots of toys that have tarter control built right in if you can get her to chew those. I think they even make dog biscuits with tarter control. If she won't chew them it might help to crush them up into bite size pieces and put in her regular food. It is important to keep the teeth clean because they can get severe infections and it could be fatal as someone else mentioned.
     
  14. missyinohio

    missyinohio Well-Known Member

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    I used to have a Sheltie that would get terrible tartar. Through one of the pet supply companies like Fosters, I got a dental tartar remover. My dog was very good while I would scrape it off his molars or away from the gumline.
     
  15. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    I give my dogs rawhide chew bones a couple of times a week, & have been doing it for years. My last old dog lived to be 13 & had good,shiney teeth to the end. Real bones can splinter & cause stomache & intestinal problems in some dogs. The very large breeds can probably handle real beef bones, but the smaller breeds have trouble with them. There is an artifical chewy called''denta-bone'' or something like that that is supposed to be good for a dog's teeth & gums, but it's kind of pricey.