Dog poop in the compost?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Real Hawkeye, Jul 6, 2005.

  1. Real Hawkeye

    Real Hawkeye Well-Known Member

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    What about dog poop in the compost pile? Good? No good? Why?
     
  2. ozarksnick

    ozarksnick Don't Tread On Me!

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  3. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i don't think the humanure handbook recommends dog poop, does it?

    the way i understand it is that many parasites that dogs carry easily adapt to a human host.

    so, maybe the composting process (if done by the book) will kill stuff, just like it does in human poop?

    i don't know. so i don't put dog or cat poop in my compost. :shrug:
     
  4. ozarksnick

    ozarksnick Don't Tread On Me!

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    Unless I am mistaken the "Handbook" recommends putting all "waste" including everyone's "feces" in the compost. As long as you are reaching thermophilic (is that the right word?) temperatures in the pile it will be fine.
     
  5. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    Nick, man, I gotta disagree with you on that one. Ewwwwww dogs can have so many things, and I don't run my life by what a book says.
    I gotta disagree on the dead chicken thing you posted in Poultry, too. But thats just my opinion. :rock:
     
  6. LaDonna

    LaDonna Well-Known Member

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    Almost without exception, dog waste is listed as a "no-no" when it comes to composting. It contains bacteria and pathogens that can be harmful to humans. Of greatest concern are parasitic worms, and of particular concern are roundworms, tapeworms and hookworms. Also, like other animal manures, dog manure is high in nitrogen so it significantly affects the ratio of carbon to nitrogen ratio, which significantly affects the decomposition process. (The bacteria and fungi in compost digest or "oxidize" carbon as an energy source, and ingest nitrogen for protein synthesis.
     
  7. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    If you're ultra-sensitive, I say compost the dog doo-doo in a special pile that will not be used on your root vegetables that are eaten raw (onions, carrots, etc). It is perfectly safe on any other vegetable. I bettcha many of you wouldn't even think twice about using raw chicken or cow manure on your vegetable garden. These manures can also contain bacteria, viruses and parasites that are pathogenic to humans.
     
  8. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    The problem with dog poop are certain pathogens and worms, as Ladonna notes above. Composting it would be like composting kitty poop. ::barf barf::

    You can do it, but the recommendations I've seen say to separate it and compost for at least a year, then only use around non-edibles --- unless you compost for longer.

    Me, I wouldn't compost it. Too much other stuff isn't at all questionable and produces excellent compost for me to bother with dog poop at all.
     
  9. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    the humanure handbook provides documented proof that composting waste for TWO years, kills all human pathogens, and renders it safe for food crops.

    but i still don't know about dog poo.... so i don't do it.


    :nerd: (cool new nerd emoticon...:)) the new ones are cute!!
     
  10. Becky H.

    Becky H. Well-Known Member

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    From what I know, a little not alot, you guys are talking about the zoonotic chain. You're not supposed to link the chain! Human-Human, Pig-Chicken-Human, Chicken-Pig-Human, Cat-Human, Monkey-Human there is NO Dog-Human. I don't even think dogs get guardia.

    The only thing you have to worry about on the dog is the worm like you would anything else there's nothing bad in the dog. For the other zoonotics the sick need to be burned or buried 3 years.

    If you're talking your healthy pet or livestock then link the chain in a regular compost, but for *foreign* blood, bones, feathers, fur and feces I'd go 3 years personally on all of it for something that is questionable. Cats are totally different though, 3 years on them nasties!