Dog people -- Take this dog?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cloverfarm, Dec 7, 2004.

  1. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    We were offered a free dog to replace Susie the Border Collie who chased one too many trucks last month :waa:

    This dog is free ... it's also six months old, one of a group of nine in the home of someone with chronic illness who has not been real involved with them ... never been around small children ... it has been taunted in the back yard by kids and others ... it is a mixture of Rottweiler, Doberman and Blue Heeler.

    We live on a farm, with lots of room ... but we also have small children and livestock.

    We're sort of leaning toward passing on this deal of a century.

    If it were just me, and I were single and had lots of time, I think I would take this pup. But it's not just me anymore, I have family to think of, too. I'm afraid this pup might be too old, too unsocialized and the wrong mixture of breeds for us.

    What do you all think? Thanks for your input ..
    Ann
     
  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would probably pass on this one too. Just doesn't sound like the dog your family needs. I'm partial to Border Collie/ Border Collie mixes.
     

  3. sheeplady

    sheeplady Well-Known Member

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    Do yourself and your future dog a big favor. Fence in a yard for the dog.We have three border collies and its in their nature to chase things. If not kept busy with livestock or rounding up small children :haha: , they will start chasing cars, trucks or bicycles. I have sheep and they help me every day, but in the off times, its great to open the door and let them out and know where they are. A real peace of mind.
    Please do not take this as a critical response, but a piece of advice from someone who has lost a dear old dog to a vehicle. A terrible lesson to learn. I don't ever want to go through that again.
     
  4. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    No offense. Our yard is partially fenced and that IS something we have discussed, whether to completely fence part of it, enlarge the yard, or what. (It's an odd shape and the house is in the middle of a circle drive. Hard to explain.) Because it was hard on all of us to lose our Border Collie. She wasn't hit on the road, she was running after the farm truck as DH was going out to the barn. She was using her favorite short-cut to catch up, and misjudged it somehow. She ran into the truck and DH could not avoid hitting her. :waa: Just horrible. A terrible end for a real good dog.

    We don't want to go through this again, especially with the kids. I have never seen DS1 cry so hard as when we buried Susie. So we will make soem changes. What, I don't know.

    Anyway ... I don't think this possible dog is really what we are looking for.

    It could be too soon after losign Susie, too.

    Our ideal would be a mix of BC and something else, or rough (?) collie and something else. DH's cousin is a vet and keeps telling us retrievers are good with kids.

    Thanks for your input
    ann
     
  5. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I would stay as far away as I could from that genetic train wreck. Probably not socialized or trained either which would make him a simply delightful mongrel to be around what with all the maulings and lawsuits. It may sound harsh but a dog like that is better off finding a home with the sleepy needle.

    If you want something good with kids a well bred Lab is pretty hard to beat. Of course I'm biased when it comes to Labs.
     
  6. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    take a pass. IF you have a large yard, great pyreense dogs, are big, good with kids, and great with livestock. I have 2. labs are also great with kids, and great dogs, but they don't mature as fast as other dogs, so they can dig, and do puppy things until they are 3 years old. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! my great pyrs. take orders from my tiny tea cup poms, it is so funny. and they are so gentle with them. and with kids. we love them. they even try to lick the chickens, I kid you not. the chickens don't like it much. funnest thing you have ever seen.
     
  7. DreamingBig

    DreamingBig Well-Known Member

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    OMG I would never have a rott or dobie around kids! All it takes is one second of reverting to that negative behavior... And yes before all the rott and dobie lovers rush to attack me, I know there are lots of wonderful ones out there. But I'd never risk one on MY kids, that's for sure.

    The more I hear about Pyrenees the better they sound. Jsut wish they didn't eat so much! :eek: Here is a neat story about three pyrs hired to run some marauding bears out fo a village. http://www.adbsys.no/nphk/1994_Pasvik_Forside.asp
     
  8. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    We have 3 Pyrenees that were chasing marauding bears off our porch at 6 months old. They don't eat as much as you would think for a dog that size. They have a pretty slow metabolism. They do however, tend to roam...a lot.
     
  9. Mastiff

    Mastiff Well-Known Member

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    Bet you all can't guess what kind of dog I like...
    The gentle giants are hard to beat.
     
  10. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I'm kinda thinking it depends a lot on the individual dog. I just went to a herding dog trial and the rottweiler there was an excellent farm hand. Good with the stock, friendly to strangers, etc. I've known really great Dobermans, too. The taunting may be a problem, and then again, it may not. Why don't you go and meet this dog, see what she's like. Sometimes neglected dogs will come to value those who love them more than most dogs raised in happy homes from puppyhood. For example, we rescued an Am Staff from the pound, and she was one of the best dogs I've ever had. Her biggest problem was the name of her breed.

    If you meet the dog and think she has personality issues, beyond puppyhood, then steer clear, of course. You just can't know, though, unless you meet her. Heck, bring along a chicken. If you like her, but want to test her with stock, go into a closed yard with her, put a long line on her, and see how hard it is to verbally get her to leave the chicken alone. That could tell you a lot right there. If she ignores the bird after one or two reprimands, you may have a real winner. But then, you may not have a really tame chicken. Try it with a chunk of beef - it'll likely give you similar information about the dog.
     
  11. jejabean

    jejabean Well-Known Member

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    If they would ship the dog to me, I'd take it! I've bred Chows (who have a bad reputation as well, undeservedly) I have always had the most gentle dogs, because they are socialized with everything...kids...aniumals...you name it.
     
  12. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Actually, the dog in question sounds like my livestock guard I'm missing right now -- a dobie/cattle dog (aka heeler, in these parts) cross. Looks like a heeler with long legs and a long nose. (And he thought he'd melt in the rain!) Rotties are a herding/farm breed as well, and aren't bad dogs around the farm if you train them properly.

    When I got him, he'd been badly abused and was turned in for being "bad with kids" -- it was pretty obvious as soon as I started working with him that it was more of a case of "kids bad with dog" rather than "dog bad with kids."

    He'd never been socialized with other dogs, was nippy when scared, was extremly hand shy, and had the worst nightmares I've ever seen in a dog. (He'd scream in his sleep!) But he was also extremely intelligent and had minimal prey drive but a strong tendency to be "barky" at stuff which was what I wanted. (Wanted a burglar alarm on four legs.) I showed him a few cats in the shelter and he was fine with those; often if a dog isn't interested in chasing cats, he's fine with livestock, too. He worked out admirably -- I'm sure missing him now.

    *shrug* Sometimes you just have to watch the dog a bit and see what the dog's like. The cross you described is not actually a bad one -- they're all breeds with a similar temperment and the cross may take out the extreme level that rottie and dobies have been bred to as far as conformation. (Which would be a good thing for a working dog.)

    Leva
     
  13. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    great pyrenees don't eat as much as you think. and if you get one at 6 weeks , it will grow up with your kids, and give its life to protect you and your ikids, from bears, to strangers. mine live with my goats, and they clean the babies off completely , if I am not out there, and they urge the little ones to mamas teats. they are really great dogs. I really love ors. we have twin boys, they were born twins, and we call them mutt and jeff.
     
  14. TedH71

    TedH71 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't like Pyrs..purebreds that is. I've seen too many bad ones to be truly interested in them. They have several problems and alot of people are saying wonderful things about them...not all of them are telling the truth. Some Pyrs have aggression issues. Alot of them can't handle the Texas heat and the hair! Oh lord, the hair! You have to make sure you comb them alot...burrs, thorns, etc all will make a mess of the dog. My friend had his female then after she died he thought all Pyrs were the same..got a male. That pup grew to be around 150 lbs and seriously aggressive and didn't like anyone even my friend. He was put down at 10 months of age after tearing apart a shirt that was on his uncle's body and attempting to maul him. I've also seen Pyr pups at 8 weeks be seriously aggressive. I don't like 'em at all...appearances can be decieving. Be aware of this. I'll probably get flack for this but it's the truth.

    Ted
     
  15. sheeplady

    sheeplady Well-Known Member

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    I think your user address is Michigan area? Check out the Border Collie Rescue in your area.
    http://www.greatlakesbcrescue.org/
    All of our dogs are rescue dogs and there is the satisfaction knowing you gave them a second chance. Besides, in foster care they are well evaluated as to temperment, kid savy, working dog traits , etc. Most rescues do charge an adoption fee which is only fair to me as they spay/ neuter ,vaccinate, feed, groom, transport, train, advertise, etc. And they screen carefully. No one wants to see a dog keep coming back into rescue. Good luck We love our BC's.
     
  16. duke3522

    duke3522 Well-Known Member

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    For family protection and down right lovability none better than an Akita. Highly intelligent, brave, loyal, and self grooming. Our big male knows his job around here is security. He knows all the best places to sit and watch over the homeplace. And back when my wife was working second shift I never had a problem leaving DS at home to go pick her up because "Hoss" would lie right in front of the door until we got back. Also great with kids. When DS was smaller he would sometimes fall on or over Hoss and he never ever seemed to mind. I think he thinks DS is as much his son as ours. One word of warning. If you have 2 Akitas sooner of later they will fight and trying to seperate 2 akitas can be kind of difficult (I have the scares to prove it). But if you want protection and a good loyal friend you can't find better than an Akita.

    duke
     
  17. ibcnya

    ibcnya Well-Known Member

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    Everyone seems to favor one breed or another. In my opinion a good German Sheperd is the most loyal of all dogs I know. Make him part of the family and you have a dog that will die for you. Protect, protect, that's all they know.
     
  18. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think you are right to pass on this dog. I'm sure he could be socialized and turn into a great dog, but if you are not into rescueing and fostering dogs, don't do it. It sounds as though you feel you "should" take the pup, but you really aren't looking forward to the work involved.

    There are plenty of dogs that need good homes; when you are ready you will find one.
     
  19. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

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    I'd probably take him, but I'm a total sucker (which is why I have a rough collie and a Bichon in my dog runs right now looking for homes, if anyone is interested. :D).

    I'd say check him out- that's a mix that will either be INCREDIBLE or an accident waiting to happen. Also, unless they KNOW what the parents were- every black and tan dog in my local shelter is labeled a 'rott mix' or a dobe mix' and at least 75% of them are black and tan hound mixes- and ACDxhound is an excellent mix!
     
  20. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for all the input, folks.
    We have decided to pass on this one. Our original plan was to wait until spring or summer when teh kids could be home from school and be more involved, but felt like we ought to consider this 6-month-old pup. And as far as dog skills, honestly, mine aren't real strong. Probably not solid enough to take on a "project."

    About Rotties -- my cousins had a family of them for years and absolutely loved them. They lived in a scary neighborhood and felt the sight of a fenced yard occupied by a BIG serious dog -- whose favorite toy was a bowling ball that she carried around just for fun -- was a deterrent. Especially since he worked midnights for years.

    And I honestly think it's too soon after losing Susie. :waa:

    Thanks for all the ideas.

    Ann