Dog breed recommendation

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by donsgal, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    We'll be moving out to the country in the not-too-distant future and, even though I am no dog lover, the idea has been discussed about getting a dog for protection (barking at strangers, etc.)

    I want a dog that is ultra low maintenance but will do it's job. No needy dogs who have to have a lot of attention. I want a sturdy, easy to maintain dog who is happy just doing his job (like those big white sheep protecting dogs are - heck I can't remember what they are called).

    I'd like a dog who is happy to be outside in any kind of weather (with proper accommodations). I plan on taking very good care of him/her and making sure that he has everything he needs to be happy and healthy. Don't get me wrong, I love animals - dogs just aren't that high on my list.

    Breed suggestions from the experts?

    thanks everybody.

    Donsgal
     
  2. midkiffsjoy

    midkiffsjoy Bedias, Texas

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    Best farm dog I ever had was a pit bull. But in hindsight I have relized that its more the dog than the breed. Now Ive got a plain mixed dog, and shes doing well. I wanted a dog to guard the house/stock at night (from people and varmits) and guard the kids during the day (Katie likes to go on "adventures" same as me when I was little). To be sure, I'm training her (though youve got to that with any dog), but she's an outside dog. Has her own little "barn" and everything (though if the goat barn was big enough.....shed be in there with them). I cant remember the name of those big white dogs but Ive heard from many people that theyve had them kill their stock too. Ive just given up and now believe that its the individual animal, as opposed to the breed. (theres always a bad apple) GOOD LUCK!!!
     

  3. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    after reading your post, i can only offer the following advice:

    please dont get a dog.
     
  4. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    A dog needs to feel like it's a member of the pack, i.e. family. You don't want a dog. It's going to know that. Why should it protect you?
     
  5. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was thinking the same thing when I read your post. Why not get an alarm system? Lot more "low maintenance" than a living, breathing animal.
     
  6. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    Yes, I understand what you and Rose and Hilltopdaisy are talking about. My heart really isn't in it. You might be right about this, but I like the idea of having a dog around that will alert us if something "just isn't right".

    I think the problem that I have with dogs is that the ones I have known personally are so needy all the time. Granted, most of them have been labs who just, absolutely LIVE for attention. I know there are dogs out there who are much more independent and that is what I am hoping to find. Oh, if I could only find a dog that is more like a cat! LOL

    Anyway, I promise you that I do love all animals and I would never put one in a situation where it was not treated well and LOVED and taken very well care of. I appreciate your concern very much.

    donsgal
     
  7. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    Please consider geese. you can eat them, eat their eggs, use their manure to fertilize your garden and they will alert you of strangers on your yard.

    they also wont want to have anything to do with you beyond wondering when your gonna feed them next.
     
  8. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    stupid question time.....

    How do you keep them from flying away?

    donsgal
     
  9. Paranoid

    Paranoid Homebrewed Happiness

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    they don't want to, they're already at the place with free food.

    but to answer directly, how you stop any bird from flying is to extend 1 wing so the flight feathers are out, and clip a bunch off.

    but that isnt necessary usually.
     
  10. pyper7

    pyper7 pyper7

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    I think I agree, as well. A well-loved dog will be the most protective. Not just a well fed, well cared for one. I admire you for being honest about your true feelings about them and asking for advice. good luck!
     
  11. boonieman

    boonieman Well-Known Member

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    I'm not a dog expert, but I've had two that stand out in my mind. First was an American Akita named Austin. He looked like a German Shepard on steroids. Excellent guard dog and very loyal. He was a big dog though, about 120 pounds and probably too much dog for your needs. I now have a Chow that's the best dog I've ever owned. She's great with people, but is very territorial and keeps most critters and other dogs away. Her personality is more like a cat and though she enjoys attention, she doesn't require a pet on the head every time you walk by. I have a dog house with straw, etc for her, but she mostly sleeps outside, even in the snow. She gets a heavy coat of fur in the winter and she looks pretty viscious, but she's not. It's enough to make strangers take pause though. I wouldn't take any amount of money for her.
     
  12. flowerpower

    flowerpower Member

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    Geese, turkey and Guinea Fowl are all really good watch birds.
     
  13. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Akitas are very protective but I've known them to go postal since they've been inbreeding them...
    My friends have a LOT of dogs, but they also have a Great White Pyrenees that is very protective of their stock, any babies that are around, and also of them. I never heard her bark, but they were always around. They had their animals in the woods for about 3 months this summer and NOTHING bothered their free range ducks and chickens, or the sheep or the rabbits or the other dogs or the cats.
    This dog is very BIG, and very devoted to them, but in a quiet, not hyper, way. It is so protective that if you have a baby in the car seat and the dog is in the car, they have to remove the dog to get to the baby...I don't know if that is good or bad but I'd feel safe with one of those around, provided they were well trained. She is very sweet. They are a BIG breed.
     
  14. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    The white LGD's are the Maremma breed.
     
  15. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    As for suggestion - Kelpie (they're an Australian sheepdog, but not the so-called Aussie). They are intelligent, but they're not quite as clever, and nowhere near as hyper, as Collies are. Unlike Collies, they wouldn't qualify for Mensa, but they wouldn't agonise over it either. I know they're available in the USA - just a question of whether they really are the same breed we have here. If not, Australian Cattle Dogs/Blue heelers are good, but they're a little more dedicated to just one or two people, and really mean it, than some others. Kelpies can grow a thicker coat and handle colder weather than can the Blue Heelers.
     
  16. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Or Great Pyrenees, or Anatolians, or Akbash.....They are all LGD's that come in pure white. The most common are the Great Pyrenees.
     
  17. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    Maremma's are white LGD's but very hard to find. I'm betting she's talking about Great Pyrenees which are probably the most common of the LGDs. At least the white ones. I have 2 of them and I disagree with the above posters. LGD's are not necessarily companion dogs, in fact the best guarding dogs don't spend much time with people. You want them bonded with what they're protecting. My Pyrs are very nice dogs but they don't follow us around begging for love like our pet dogs do. They work here and we take good care of them in turn. They are fine in all weather if they have shelter to go in if they choose. Brushing is really the most maintenance they require. And we don't honestly do a whole lot of that. They get very matted after a long winter, so they go in once a year for grooming a nd trimming.

    Pyrs can be very cat-like, affectionate but not overly so, and on their own terms. They can be obedience trained, but don't usually respond like other breeds. Imagine training a cat to come...similar to a guarding Pyr. Like cats they will also roam. So, if you don't live like we do (surrounded by National Forest), be prepared to fence well..they are good at getting out of most fences, including hot wire.
     
  18. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Geese are great alarms. How many have written this? So consider a few geese. If you decide to get a LGD, really researth the breeds. One kind will bark when they sense trouble (which interupts the stalking sequence of the wolf, so they stop and go away), but others are more aggressive. Do not get the big white fluffy maremma. Too aggressive for your situation.

    Northern breeds tend to be low maintenance, unless specificly bred for the pet market for generations, in which case they are more like other dogs. They don't mind being alone, but they tend not to be very obedient and often don't alarm bark. But, just being a dog, they can put off a bad guy by mere presence.

    An old fashioned rough coated collie (Lassie) or what they call a farm collie, may suit your purpose. They should have a shelter but can handle inclimant weather. You can leave the dog outside during the day, but I would bring it in during the night. Having the dog inside with the family will help to make it more biddable, and is more of a deterrent to someone who wants to enter the house. Colllies need some grooming, but not in the line of an afghan or poodle. A weekly combout will keep him up, unless you get a show dog.
     
  19. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Formerly LisainN.Idaho Supporter

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    I have to ask: why would you want to bring a guardian dog in at night when that is the time most predations occur?
     
  20. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    I agree,BTDT.If you go Akita it best be from a reputable breeder with lots of positive recommendations.A poorly bred,unsocialized Akita is a very dangerous dog.Breeding is crucial in my humble opinion.

    BooBoo