Does it cost a lot to ....

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by dragonfly1113, Dec 10, 2006.

  1. dragonfly1113

    dragonfly1113 Well-Known Member

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    does it cost a lot to have a well dug? How many of you have wells and how do you like having a well verses county/city water? I talked to lady the other day and she already had an existing well but had to have it redug (?)
    and everything new put in. It cost her $3000 but she said it would have cost her that much to hook up to county water. I was shocked that it would cost that much to hook up to water.
    Susie
     
  2. ricky

    ricky Well-Known Member

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    i guess it goes for about 10 dollars a foot to drill a well in most places. city water is nice but it costs money to use but there is always plenty of water. wells are funny some times they go dry some times not but you always have to be carefull with water use. I just left a town system that charged a sewer cost to recycle your water or treat the waste and for every 1000 gallons of water use they charged you about 3 times the money. so my water bill was always 150 to 200 dollars a month
     

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The 'city water' deal around here often turns into a monopoly. In order to make the big pipes pay, they require you to seal off all other wells & not dig any more. Some places assess sewage fee based on what water you use, so any 'consumed' by watering the garden, or livestock, etc. is overly billed. Often the assessments are very unfair to rural folks, as they are based on city usage patterns. Over a 20 year period, the city water costs much more than having your own well. 'Here.'

    Now, what kind of well do you need? Deep, shallow, jet pump, bored or dug?

    Around 'here' the only thing allowed/ that works is a deep well, 5" or more casing, probably about 260 feet deep you hit all the water you can get up a 1" pipe.

    Will run $10,000 - 20,000 depending on the many variables.

    A dug or bored shallow well can be a lot cheaper, but are subject to contamination and are no longer allowed 'here'.

    --->Paul
     
  4. hoofinitnorth

    hoofinitnorth Well-Known Member

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    I think we paid about $5,000 for our 148-foot well 2 years ago (about $33/lineal foot). We paid another few thousand to have the waterline stubbed to the house and buried DEEP since we have deep frost in the winter.

    In this area of Southcentral Alaska, "city water" is not an option - doesn't exist. Wells are now running closer to $40 per lineal foot to drill PLUS shoe and liner and pump and waterline and there are NO guarantees. You could go 300' and never hit good water. We got lucky, even if it didn't feel like it when we got the bill - we have clean water with a decent flow of 15gpm. The only thing we've had a little concern over is the iron sediments but we had a simple fix (cheap in-line whole house filter for about $50 and we're about to try going from 10 to 5 microns for the filter size) but the well passed with flying colors on a comprehensive test that had everything from heavy metals to nitrates & fertilizers to bacteria, etc.

    Only a couple of years ago I was quoted $22/lineal foot! Prices keep going up and the well drillers were complaining that the steel they had to use was junk - brittle. They say it was coming from China since US sold off much of their steel holdings. They were NOT happy about that!

    One of my other sisters bought a rural place in WA state for a future vineyard. It already had an 800' well that didn't produce much. She was about to have another one drilled and estimated it would cost at least $15,000 IF they hit anything before 1,000'... And I think she said she was quoted $15/lineal foot...
     
  5. Linda H

    Linda H Missouri Ozarks

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    I live in Missouri and it costs $600.00 to get hooked up to rural water. That fee covered the meter plus 100 feet of line. Anything over 100 feet costs 2.00 a feet if I remember right. We use between 3,000-5,000 gallons a month and it runs about 20.00 a month.

    I grew up with a well and there was no way I wanted that headache. Wells are for nice young healthy people.
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is extremely low water usage for a homestead. Add 20-30 head of cattle or watering truck crops on several acres or.... And you end up using close to that per day.

    Then the well looks a _lot_ better. :)

    Depends on how easy it is to hit water & quality, of course.

    --->Paul
     
  7. BertaBurtonLake

    BertaBurtonLake Well-Known Member

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    We are in the process of having our new well dug for our new house. They have bored the hole and hit water at 210 feet. They are coming back today to install all the pipes to get the water to the house and put in the holding tank and pump. The cost is $3500.00. We live in Pittsylvania County, VA.
    When I talked to a guy in Florida about purchasing a hand pump for a deep well, he said there the same thing would cost in the $10k to $12k range, so I guess costs vary widely, depending on your location.

    We love being on a well. The initial outlay for cost is the only expense unless there are repairs needed to equipment at a later date.
    We lived in town over 4 years ago before we moved out here and were on town water there. Flouride and chlorine in the water (yuck) and we were billed for consumption plus sewage which, as was previously pointed out, is based on your consumption. We paid about $75 a quarter IIRC for a family of five's water use and sewage.

    I hope this helps. If it were me, I would dig the well hands down, but your mileage amy vary

    ~Berta
     
  8. mwhit

    mwhit Well-Known Member

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    A well can be cheap or expensive-- it really depends upon the situation. THe deeper you need to go the more it will cost. I do not have a well-- I'm hooked up to village water although I am outside village limits. They were discussing last month discontinuing my water service (and a few other residences) because we are the only ones with water outside the village and the line is not in very good condition (there have been several leaks)... This was set up in the 1960's-- the man that built my house bought and laid the line to be able to get water (not sewer-- I have a septic system)... he was an 'important' fellah to the officials so they did this for him-- no contract was ever signed... it was a handshake deal. He spent alot of money on things for the town including thousands of dollars of Christmas decorations, scholarships for graduating seniors, money for the library and a 25 acre field he gave the Lions Club for field days. The village officials have since changed their minds because the family of the 86 year old man that lives a few thousand feet outside the village called the 'local' paper and I guess they felt cruel after he was quoted as saying 'I'm an old man, I ain't got no money for a well' so now they are going to keep supplying water until he dies or no longer lives there and then they are going to replace the line, but not as far as his residence. Just my 2 houses, a neighbor in a trailer, the place my sister lives and the home my grandpa lived in. (I own the first 220' out of the village-- the neighbor owns 100 feet and then I own 220' more that my sister and gramps old place are on) so they will be running 540' of water line. I hope they do not change their minds again....

    I pay $55 every 3 months for water ($220/year)-- there are no meters here. Definately much cheaper than drilling and maintaining a well, water pump etc.
     
  9. mamagoose

    mamagoose Well-Known Member

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    I think there's a lot more than fluoride and chlorine in treated water that isn't found in most natural beds (if not contaminated by human intervention). I read somewhere that the fluoride used comes from the by-products of scrubbers of some factories and it includes even mercury and lead. Sure wish I had the resources to confirm such and that we had easy and inexpensive access to water testing for any drinkable water.
     
  10. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    mwhit in many areas water supply is a "right" once they start to suppy you water they have to continue. You might wanna look into that. In Alaska there are gas stations that have to leave a spickit open to the public becuase they have in the past .In Il I know of a township thats afraid to fix a road because a pipe that was put under it to drain water is used to water stock and the owner threatens leagal action when ever they think of fixing the road.
     
  11. highlands

    highlands Well-Known Member

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    Town/county water is not an option here - there isn't any such thing. We were told it was going to cost $5,000 (barest minimum, plan on lots of extra costs) to $15,000. Instead we went without running water for a year, saved every penny we could and used that to buy a tractor with a backhoe and bucket loader. Then we put in the system ourselves. This was less expensive and we got a free tractor in the deal. In retrospect, we made the right choice.
     
  12. TnAndy

    TnAndy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The cost of well drilling is based on LOTS of factors. I could also relate to you the cost of drilling the wells I've had drilled in the past, or the cost of local ultility water......but none of that would make any difference in what it is going to cost YOU in YOUR location.

    Call the local water ultility and ask if you have water availiable, and what the cost of connection is......then you have to generally figure the cost of a line to your house.....most places don't include anything past the water meter.....but ask...they might.

    To compare a well, call some local well drillers. They will give you a ballpark cost, and may be able to get fairly close based on your location if they have drilled wells there before.

    But be aware a well is like a trip to Vegas....it's often a pure crapshoot.

    Within a 1/2 mile of me, there are wells that produce 100gal/min from 60', and wells that are almost dry holes at 700'. I have had 5 drilled personally, and they vary from 25gal/m at 120' to 5 gal/m at 380'.....and these are all within a 1/4 mile of each other. Needless to say.....the price varied considerably.

    Utility water is often a better price deal, assuming you are not a large user of water, over a well......but not always. Problem is, you really can't compare the numbers until AFTER you have the well in place and pumping.
     
  13. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    the above is very close to what our well is.
    Back about 15 years ago. It's drilled 140 ft. and the submersable pump sits at 100 ft. suspended. Cost $30/ft. then. I don't know how much now, but I'd guess at least $40/ft or more. Digging to set the intake below frost line was the expected expense. Altogether with pump, wiring, labor, line, trenching, etc. be looking at around $8000 or more nowdays. 'city water' isn't an option in outback rural areas, and a shallow that is called a 'surface well' around here generally suck sand and go dry in the middle of summer.
     
  14. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I understand wells are costing about 10,000 here now--we drilled ours in 1977, have a rural meter too--but liked the (our)water better, so went back to it.
     
  15. MsSpot

    MsSpot Well-Known Member

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    I am married to a rural waterman. He manages the community water company and we have about 230 customers. The charge here to hook up to the "city water" is $500 for the meter installation and water line to YOUR property line plus a $35 hookup fee.

    The way water costs are added up is the more water you use, the less it costs. For instance, up to the first thousand gallons is $16, then everything after that up to 10,000 gallons is $3 per thousand, anything over 10,000 gallons is $2 per thousand gallons.

    Folks still think that is too much for per gallon, but how many of you go into a convenience store and pay over a $1 for 16 OUNCES of water? For the first 1,000 gallons with us, the charge is 1.6 cents per gallon. By the time you get to the 10,000th gallon, you are only paying 2/10 of a cent per gallon. You might keep that in mind next time you buy a bottle of Dasani Water.
     
  16. mwhit

    mwhit Well-Known Member

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    In NY a municipality does not have to continue providing the water if they do not want to-- usually they have to prove it is causing hardship (water shortage) for those inside the village, but it is at their discretion. The hardship here was supposedly the occassional water line leak-- I've lived in this house for a few years and never had a leak, but down the road farther there have been a few. They gave me a notice in Nov. that stated as of Jan. 2008 they would no longer be providing water to us-- I looked into it and they can legally do that especially because there has never (since 1964) been a contract-- it's not like an easement here. I really would not have minded getting a well (my cousin does wells and I'm sure he would have given me a deal) but I'm glad I do not have to. I do have several springs out back, so it really would not have been a problem to get water-- my only concern was the amount of trash etc. that had been on this property. One thing about our village water-- it is not flouridated and only has minimal chlorine.... it is drawn from a well, not filtered river water or anything like that.
     
  17. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My well is 328 ft deep, and cost $12,500 to have drilled 9 years ago. The nextdoor piece of property just put in a well last summer...cost about $23,000 I think, for the same depth. Different parts of the country it can be quite a bit cheaper.
     
  18. Mallow

    Mallow Well-Known Member

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    I think most of the cost variances are due to the type of rock/soil that they have to drill through. If they have hard rock thats eating a bit fast and it takes longer to drill they charge more per foot. Here a well is about $10 / foot in WV.
     
  19. dhaley

    dhaley Rebel Chick

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    We just priced our well, and it is going to cost $5000 ofr 180 ft. But there is a lot of rock to go through on our property.

    I grew up with well water, then moved into a city with my hubby after we were married. Lived there 10 years and I refused to drink the water. It stunk like chemicals so bad you couldn't get it past your nose. I'll take well water any day. Not only does it taste better, but it is cheaper in the long run.
     
  20. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    All my wells are bored (very much recommend drilled wells though), and they were costing about $2K for guaranteed water five years ago. Our area is not that rocky and we're blessed with sufficient ground water, except during prolonged droughts.