Does DirecWay (or other satellite internet) need electricity? (Is Solar ok?)

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mommykood, Jan 10, 2005.

  1. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    UPDATE: See update post in thread :)

    Hello, everyone! :)

    Another question! :)

    We are looking into DirecWay (or any other same type of satellite internet available in our area). Our homestead that we are moving to in two months will be completely off-grid, with no electrical or phone lines.

    Is "regular" electricity required for DirecWay (or other satellite internet)? How does the satellite internet hook-up? Is electricity required?

    Thanks! :)

    Jen :)
     
  2. Lt. Wombat

    Lt. Wombat Well-Known Member

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    You must have a phone line to do the initial setup, plus anytime you do a re-install.

    Yes you need electricity for the computer and the 2 satellite modems.

    The way it is set up you have the antenna which has 2 wires coming off of it. One goes to the send modem the other to the receive modem.

    Some times when the system (DW) slows down you need to cycle the modems off then back on. And if it's really messed up you delete it off then run setup again which requires the phone libe again.
     

  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Direway no longer uses two satellite modems. They use one, its called the DW6000. I have satellite internet, and the power you need is for the DW6000. The phone line is so the guy setting you up can call, and go YADDA YADDA YADDA, so your set. So yes, you need power and phone lines. However, if there is some sort of cell phone service, they can do it that way too.



    Jeff
     
  4. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    my direcway system is the dw6000 and it was set up with no phone lines. the service man used his cell if he needed to make a call, and there is no longer a need to download any programing either. i work off of modified sinewave solar power just fine.
     
  5. MicheleMomof4

    MicheleMomof4 Well-Known Member

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    Since a few you have it, so do I, I was wondering if you found it to be slow? Mine is slow and times out alot in downloads. Many calls to the service center has turned fruitless. Any ideas?
     
  6. mommykood

    mommykood Active Member

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    Dec 30, 2004
    Location:
    WI
    **UPDATE**

    I have found the specifications for the DW6000, what is probably what we will end up with...

    Modem Specifications
    Weight 3.5 pounds Input Line Volts 90-264 V - 2 Amps Max
    Width 1.7 inches Input Line Frequency 50-60 HZ
    Height 9.5 inches AC Current 100 Watts
    Depth 10.5 inches Typical Power Consumption 15 Watts

    The "AC Current 100 Watts" and the "Typical Power Consumption 15 Watts" are what I am most concerned with. Which one do I need to use to calculate if I will have enough solar power?

    Also, anyone know if there is another component of the system that uses electricity? (Like does the actual dish use electricity?)

    Thanks for all the info so far! :)

    Jen
     
  7. BobBoyce

    BobBoyce Well-Known Member

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    The 100 watts is the maximum power figure with the transmitter operating, the typical power consumption is the average.

    The way those systems work is they upload and download packets, so the maximum power figure applies to when the dish is transmitting. Receiving takes very little power, less than 10 watts. They average the transmitter on time down for what they consider normal usage to come up with the typical power consumption figure. If you do a lot of data sending, your average power used will be higher.

    To be on the safe side, I would double their average load figure to 30 watts to make sure you have enough power reserve in your battery bank. The electronics in the dish should be powered by the receiver/modem.

    Bob
     
  8. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Around our area I see many RV'ers with satellite dishs. Most seem to be DishTV.

    We used to have Dish and we for a very long time didnt have it hooked to a phone line. I did for set up and that was it, even ordered pay per view.


    Mrs Whodunit
     
  9. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    All our CRT TVs and the dishtv sat run great on modifed sinewave from a freedom 458 inverter.My Samsung LCD monitor/tv reciever buzzes on mod sinewave 120volt,havent tried it 12volt direct yet but it has the capability.Sony stereo buzzes on modified sine wave.I see Xantrex is offering a 400 watt pure sine wave inverter now,would be cool for small power draw items.

    BooBoo