Does anyone use this fencing?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by CountryGoalie, Sep 21, 2005.

  1. CountryGoalie

    CountryGoalie Well-Known Member

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    I heard (well, okay, read) some of the folks on the Poultry board talking about Premier 1 fencing, so out of curiosity I looked it up. As some of you may know, my homestead plans as far as "larger" livestock go is still in the planning stages. There's only so much a sixteen year-old can do at this moment in time. :rolleyes:

    At the moment, some of the livestock I'm considering are Icelandic sheep, and possibly pot-bellied pigs and/or a couple of Dexter cattle. While browsing Premier 1, I found this fencing, and I liked the look of it. Does anyone here use it?

    Has anyone here used it for the breeds/varieties that I'm specifically talking about? What about keeping a mixed group inside the fencing of a large enough area? Or would I need to section the pasture off and keep the pigs separate from the sheep? What about a couple of Dexters, or a couple of larger steers being raised for beef? Have any of you that have used had LGDs behind it? How did it hold up with keeping them in?

    I'd definitely have to have an LGD with the livestock, as our area is coyote territory. As much as I love to hear them singing at night when I can't sleep, I wouldn't feel comfortabe knowing that they're there and not having some sort of livestock protection. :eek:

    EDIT:
    And another thought... would anyone consider keeping a horse behind this fencing? Back when we had ours, we were able to keep them behind three strands of electric fence that were pretty evenly spaced. Could this fence stand up to a horse? At least, a docile draft or draft cross? (I'd love to work the fields and log our woods with a horse, see. :rock: )
     
  2. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My drafts are fenced in with one single strand of electric tape, and they are fine. I would not do it with a high-strung horse. I have an area that has yet to be permanently fenced, and I use the electronet with my Nigerian Dwarf goats, sheep and chickens. The chickens will go through it sometimes, but the bigger critters are very mindful of it.

    I think it's wonderful that a sixteen year old is making plans to homestead. I was about that age when I found my first copy of "Practical Homesteading" by John Vivian, and the rest is history.
     

  3. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    We use Premier in combination with a woven wire fence. Our snow load can get up to 4-5' and an electric fence would be useless in winter, hence a relatively "small" winter space is fenced in field fence, the rest of our property is done in rolls of either portable sheep fence or what they call "semi-perminant."

    I've only had one dog go through my fences... and they were some surprised and yelped a lot (but kept going). Such a dog would have gone through a conventional fence as well, but the dog brought the electric down to the ground. If the owner hadn't been there and hadn't had family with him the sheep could have scattered to the four winds.

    Or at least the blueberry patch!

    But my lambs hit that fence when they are a few days old (ZAP... MAMMA MAMMA MAAAAA MAAAAAA... nurse nurse nurse) and never challenge it again. On, off, or, usually, on the ground!
     
  4. CountryGoalie

    CountryGoalie Well-Known Member

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    Mmm, yes, that's another thing - poultry. I was unsure of whether or not I could keep poultry "loose" in the pasture, I suppose it would depend on just how poultry-friendly the rest of the livestock is. It sounds like you keep the chickens in with your goats and sheep... how has that worked for you?

    I considered the idea of making a chicken tractor of sorts and moving that around the pasture, that way they're getting pasture-time but they're not threatened by any overzealous livestock. The only thing that I think maybe wouldn't get along with them would be the pot-belly pigs?

    Mm, I'll have to keep my eyes open for that book. I've lived on "old farmland" since I was four, so really if I wanted to start homesteading, and had the time, inclination, and ... well, the money ... I know that my parents would let me convert this old place. I'm an only child and they don't have any plans for moving (especially now that my grandparents have put a house in across the street), so I'm researching a tentative plan, as I hope to settle here, too. It all depends on where the Lord leads me. (But I hope His plan is to have me stay here. :rolleyes: )

    Mmm, yes, there's another thing - snow load. Some years we don't get much, some years we get a lot. Nasty ol' lake effect machine. The fence that I linked to, is normal fence on the bottom and electric strands toward the top - would that be good for in the snow, so that the electric isn't actually being covered by the snow?
     
  5. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    My horses are behind one strand of electric rope( from Premier).A Quarter horse and a couple of Draft mixes. They mind it but they do test it. Sometimes I have it hot sometimes I don't. It all depends how much feed is in the pasture. If there is not much they will test it to see if they can get to some better stuff. If they have enough feed, they will not bother.

    I have the netting as well, for poultry. Works well.

    Jill
     
  6. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    The cost of that fencing would discourage me from considering it for anything but a small paddock - and I'm not certain what I'd use such a paddock for... High tensile electric is my fence of choice as I can hold virtually any animal in or out with it - serves both purposes. In regards to snow load: each strand can be individually switched so if you have two feet of snow that shorts out the bottom 3 strands, simply turn them off. The remaining strands stay hot and the fence continues to be functional. I use a low impedence (weed burner) charger which doesn't seem to be affected [much] by snow load unless the wire actually bends to contact the ground. I'm suspect there is some loss of charge, but equally CERTAIN that it's not a total short!!

    You can keep chickens with most livestock EXCEPT PIGS LOL!