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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DD has been making jewelry for herself and her friends for a few years now. She hasn't sold any, just given as gifts. Her stuff is always well received and we see the other girls wearing it regularly, so it appears to be liked.

Now, she would like to try to sell some of it. I don't know the first thing about jewelry making/selling. What kinds of things should she know first?
 

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Goshen Farm
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This may sound silly but I dont mean it to. I make and sell jewelry at the summer farmers markets here in Montana. I find that the most important thing is keeping up on the seasons hot colors and styles. I wish I were a better salesperson though as I believe my shyness hinders me quite a bit. sis
 

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I have dabbled in this occasionally. I love doing it and it can be great fun.
The big thing for me was to make sure I am not over investing in supplies.
Let me try to explain....
They say a good rule of thumb to make a healthy profit is to be able to sell your finished pieces for 3X the amount you have invested in it. Make sure that selling something at 3x's the supply is feasible. You don't want to spend $5.00 making something if there is no way someone is going to pay $15.00 for it.

Also is this daughter a teen or younger? (obviously don't answer that...just something to consider) The style, budget, materials, etc, of her customer's is something to consider.
When I do this, I only use sterling silver components, but that may or may not be feasible for her. I am also able to "advertise" as sterling silver, and it's a good selling point. That's probably something that a younger customer may not care about.

Also, I have several suppliers that I love to use, but hands down, my favorite is Fire Mountain Gems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This may sound silly but I dont mean it to. I make and sell jewelry at the summer farmers markets here in Montana. I find that the most important thing is keeping up on the seasons hot colors and styles. I wish I were a better salesperson though as I believe my shyness hinders me quite a bit. sis
I don't think your post is silly at all! Your advice is good... I hadn't given much thought to the trend aspect of jewelry (though I bet DD has). Thats a good point.

I'm shy also. Thankfully DD did not inherit that trait from me. She has a bubbly, friendly personality that always brings a smile. I don't worry too much about her ability to sell. I DO worry about her ability to take criticism/rejection, but I suppose that's just a mother's anxiety!
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have dabbled in this occasionally. I love doing it and it can be great fun.
The big thing for me was to make sure I am not over investing in supplies.
Let me try to explain....
They say a good rule of thumb to make a healthy profit is to be able to sell your finished pieces for 3X the amount you have invested in it. Make sure that selling something at 3x's the supply is feasible. You don't want to spend $5.00 making something if there is no way someone is going to pay $15.00 for it.

Also is this daughter a teen or younger? (obviously don't answer that...just something to consider) The style, budget, materials, etc, of her customer's is something to consider.
When I do this, I only use sterling silver components, but that may or may not be feasible for her. I am also able to "advertise" as sterling silver, and it's a good selling point. That's probably something that a younger customer may not care about.

Also, I have several suppliers that I love to use, but hands down, my favorite is Fire Mountain Gems.

Thanks for the tip on Fire Mountain Gems. So far, she has only bought her materials at local hobby shops and crafters chainstores. She'll need to look into buying in bulk.

We had already figured on pricing, and the need to stay within a certain range for construction costs. The 3x rule is good... I like that. I'll be sure to mention it to her.
 

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Metal melter
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I've been making and selling jewelry for a couple of years.

I've gone to classes to learn lampworking (glass bead-making) and metal-smithing. While I love both of those things, I knew that I would quickly become obsessed with them, so I've chosen to focus on other things right now. Perhaps your daughter would be good at one of those things!

What has worked for me is to have lots of different styles. That way, your work appeals to a wide range of people. I know some folks say you should pick one style or one product line and focus on that, but I'm very easily bored and that would never work for me...I'd go crazy. I make all sorts of jewelry, key fobs, lip gloss, soap, bookmarks, candy, beaded spoons and other serving utensils, knitted scarves, jeweled vases, purses, stationary and greeting cards...you get the idea. People can buy gifts for lots of different kinds of people at my tables at craft shows (or home shows).

For some ideas about what sells well, check out my etsy shop link (in my signature) and click on my sold items (right now it says "44 sales") on the right-hand side of the screen. You can also look all around etsy and see what other shops have sold. I'm most certainly not saying to copy anyone, but it might serve as an inspiration.

Good luck to your daughter!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've been making and selling jewelry for a couple of years.

I've gone to classes to learn lampworking (glass bead-making) and metal-smithing. While I love both of those things, I knew that I would quickly become obsessed with them, so I've chosen to focus on other things right now. Perhaps your daughter would be good at one of those things!

What has worked for me is to have lots of different styles. That way, your work appeals to a wide range of people. I know some folks say you should pick one style or one product line and focus on that, but I'm very easily bored and that would never work for me...I'd go crazy. I make all sorts of jewelry, key fobs, lip gloss, soap, bookmarks, candy, beaded spoons and other serving utensils, knitted scarves, jeweled vases, purses, stationary and greeting cards...you get the idea. People can buy gifts for lots of different kinds of people at my tables at craft shows (or home shows).

For some ideas about what sells well, check out my etsy shop link (in my signature) and click on my sold items (right now it says "44 sales") on the right-hand side of the screen. You can also look all around etsy and see what other shops have sold. I'm most certainly not saying to copy anyone, but it might serve as an inspiration.

Good luck to your daughter!
I can see my daughter creating all sorts of items. She paints, sews, quilts, makes jewelry, soap, etc. She loves any kind of designing/creating. Though at this point she has only gotten feedback on her jewelry. The other stuff has been experimental and only for her own enjoyment.
She has much more creative flair than I EVER will!

I'll direct her to your link. Thanks for sharing!
 

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If she can try selling some on e-bay and offer it at farmers markets if they are around your area--here a space is free. Craft shows usually cost money for a booth some as cheap as $15 and up to $100 around here. We also have craft consignment shops here with inexpensive rent per month. Just some thoughts.

Does anyone else she knows craft, knit, sew or do beading? Could they go together to rent a space or booth?
 
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