Does anyone have a Pyrenees that....

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by dragonfly1113, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. dragonfly1113

    dragonfly1113 Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone own a pyr that lives in town? I am wondering how well they would do in a big fenced in yard. (privacy fence) I want one so bad but I also want to be fair to the animal. I have a husky and also am wondering how well they would get along. Husky is a dominant (sp) female. If one was raised in town do you think it would bark a lot?
    Susie
     
  2. Cashs Cowgirl

    Cashs Cowgirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They bark quite a bit at night...actually they bark many warning barks during the day too...I don't think it just living in your backyard is a good idea. They need to have a job, they are a working dog-boredom in most dogs is a bad thing and many Pyrs love to dig. If it lived inside (with outside playtime) that would be better, but then again, there's the issue of the hair...They have LOTS of hair.
     

  3. mizattitude

    mizattitude Well-Known Member

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    I had a golden/pyr dog as a kid. I remember the "craters" she would dig. Our yard always looked as if a Bomb went off.
     
  4. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    They dig a lot and bark a lot, esp at night. Barking is one of the main reasons Pyrs end up in rescue. If you're willing to consider an older dog, there are tons in rescue and you ought to be able to find one that is happy to be a couch potato and doesn't bark too much. With a dominant female, I'd try to get a male that is pretty laid back. I know with our local rescue group most dogs that come through never make it to the web page because they get matched with waiting families so if you don't see what you want listed, don't feel there isn't one out there. If you do go with a rescue, be very realistic and specific about what you want and then wait for the right dog. Better to wait a little bit for the right one than to recycle one that you didn't feel quite right about.
     
  5. simplepeace

    simplepeace NY

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    My old neighbors have a pyr. She barked non-stop, drove me crazy sometimes (but then again it was not a quiet neighborhood, she was the least of anyone's worries). They had 2 other dogs with her, miscellaneous other animals that she lived with, she wasn't just sitting alone bored. She had a job and she was on alert most of the time since we lived in a neighborhood with plenty of foot traffic.

    They knew she barked, but no one complained so they pretty much gave up and let her bark. They would try to get her to stop barking sometimes and she would stop barking on her own sometimes too :). For a minute.
    Did I say she barked non-stop?
    I personally would NEVER have a Pyr in a neighborhood. But... someone mentioned a rescue (perfect if you can find just the right dog - since they
    can all be a little different, you might find a great match that way).

    Best bet is over the age of 2 as well, since they mature late.
    K
     
  6. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    I agree with that. There is an element of mental illness that shows up in some lines of Pyrs that shows up at about 2 yrs. If you get one a little older than that, you've got a pretty good idea of what they will be like the rest of their lives.
     
  7. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Please----- don't do that...it would probably end up at the pound or in a rescue... These dogs are breed to have a job--that job is to guard and defend it's property. It barks as a warning and it barks often...at anything that moves to close to 'it's property...We have had friends who had one they lived in the country and they could not stand the barking at night...he ended up in a rescue...at 2yrs old w/ no training.... These dogs dig huge holes to stay cool, have long, thick hair -- they shed terrible and in hunks of hair, they are wanders if not contained in a large fenced area, and they are defensive of 'their' property--many kill cats, dogs, squirrels anything that they are not raised w/...
     
  8. dragonfly1113

    dragonfly1113 Well-Known Member

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    I think it is best to just wait until I live in the country. I have a neighbor that has those beagle hounds and they bark all the time. Waiting until I am in the country will be best for the dog. Thanks for the opinions.
    Susie
     
  9. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Im glad youve made that choice. LGD's need lots of space to run
     
  10. mizattitude

    mizattitude Well-Known Member

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    Yup...I recall her never shutting up. Best dog ever though. Smart? OMG..the dog was almost human.

    Being a kid..I used to aggravate the tar out of her..she always knew when I was going to start..she'd bare her teeth at me..LOL....


    I miss her!
     
  11. mizattitude

    mizattitude Well-Known Member

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    almost as annoying as a beagles barking and howling..but not quite! very close though. I think beagles do shutup at some pint. These dogs..are like the energizer bunny at barking. My dog could go all night... it was always a barkfest
     
  12. Corgitails

    Corgitails Well-Known Member

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    Honestly? If it's going to be an INDOOR dog and you can provide sufficient exercise, it *can* work. We have 4 in my obedience club that are just pets. SPIN and other Pyr rescue groups can help if you're willing to consider adults- there *are* Pyrs who aren't barky and are terrible LGDs... It's just going to be more difficult than keeping a working Pyr. If you really *want* one, go for it. But if you want a more laid back, unbarky dog... consider a Newfie or a breed that's been bred more for companionship in recent history. (And if you do decide to go for a Pyr puppy, I'd look for AKC show lines.)
     
  13. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    I will never be without a Pyr. We have a decent sized farm and the 3 Pyrenees and the 1 Aussie keep it pretty well covered. These are non-registered "farm-type" dogs. They or their decendents would never make it in the city. Even the litter of pups we have now ranges far and wide and do their "job". AKC show pups are probably better suited as house pets or yard dogs (if there is that sort of thing with Pyrs). I would think that dogs from show lines have spent generations being culled for certain behaviors and bred for others. Things not useful in the "real world" of LGD. I am only theorizing extremes though. There are certainly huge cross overs. But in general, a Pyr is a country dog, and a good one.
     
  14. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    Our Pyrs are all AKC registered and would qualify as "show" dogs as we bought breeder quality dogs. These dogs are WORKING dogs on our homestead. They don't know they have papers and can't read them anyway, so their papers mean little to nothing when it comes to the dogs' working ability. What was important for us when seeking working LGD pups was that the pups had been raised around livestock, had a health guarantee and were physically sound specimens. We wanted papers because we want to have 100 percent Pyrs. The only way to really know that, or the closest way to know that I should say, is to buy papered stock. But papered or not doesn't make a good LGD. It's the dog, not the registration.
    I have seen dogs do well in a suburban environment, but only when the owners had plenty of time to devote to the animal, brushing, walking, playing, etc. Most times, we just don't have the time it requires to care for these animals in a suburban type of environment, so they are best left to the homesteaders/farmers.
    And for the record, my pyrs do not bark all night. They do bark off and on throughout the night, but more often not barking than barking. But then, I live out where there aren 't a lot of man made noises to distract them.
     
  15. silvergirl

    silvergirl Well-Known Member

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    Well, I might as well put my two cents worth in - our George is a Pyr and a great all round dog... but a town dog he could never be - not in a million years - he's a car chaser, and a ditch digger, and a wanderer: if given half a chance he will bolt and be gone - doesn't come home til he's ready, but works the perimeter of whatever area he's decided is his... it changes regularly, though... smart? well, I'm not sure about that but he sure works at outsmarting us, and more than occasionally manages... he is quiet at night, in the house, although he does bark all day, unless he passes out from sheer exhaustion, but he's right back at it when he wakes up... the fella takes his job seriously - and that job (according to him) is to bark so that all the other dogs that might just possibly be lurking out of sight somewhere know that he's there and doing his job... I have tried to tell him that there are no other dogs lurking, but he feels (and somewhat justifiably so) that the sheer absence of other dogs is obvious proof that his system is working... how can you argue with that? He's our George, and we love him...
    silvergirl
     
  16. thequeensblessing

    thequeensblessing Well-Known Member

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    I am amazed at how many of you have pyrs that just bark all day or all night. None of ours do that. They bark when there's something to bark at, and they give off their signature "alert bark" at intervals throughout the night. Now, granted, our male is out with the livestock where I don't hear him all night, however, whenever we're out with the livestock after dark, we just don't hear him barking all the time. Our female, who has the run of our fenced in homestead, doesn't bark all night either. She sleeps on the porch most of the day, and at night she "patrols" and "alert barks" but that's about it. When they really bark non-stop, we know it's time to go investigate. I don't think I'd have a dog that barked non-stop. I've never had a pyr that did.
     
  17. cricket

    cricket Well-Known Member

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    I have one pet and one working Pyr. Our pet pyr will bark all night if left alone. The working girl only barks when there is something out there and then it's a "go away or I will eat you bark". Pyrs raised as pets do very well in all environments but they really do have to have a "job" of some sort, even if it's "guarding" the guinea pig or kids. Baloo stays in the house with us and he's a very happy boy there. Yes, I have to brush him every other day and vacuum every day but it's worth it. They will drool enough to fill pools so keep that in mind. You learn to keep drool rags in every room of the house... :)

    If you want a pet Pyr, please get one from a rescue. HOWEVER (saying this as a rescuer!!!) make sure the dog in question was NOT a working dog before your home. Many rescues think making a working dog work is "cruel and inhumane". They make me crazy...but that's another thread. :flame: Pyrs are fabulous dogs but they don't go from working to unemployed well. They do fine for a little while but then they get very sad or very angry. The rescues mean well but they don't always have a clear picture of the breed.

    I will never be without 2 - 1 for the pasture and 1 for the house.
     
  18. dragonfly1113

    dragonfly1113 Well-Known Member

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    I always wanted a siberian husky. I thought they are sooo cute. I read up on them and thought I can handle it. So I bought one. I have a 6 ft. privacy fence and a large back yard. My husky has driven me mad. Whatever problem she has given me I have always found a fix. I would never send her to a pound. Never, ever. But I would never own another one. She has started acting lonely. Wanting someone to play with. She kills small animals but not dogs. She barks some at night but I dont really hear her because I run a loud fan at night. I have fell in love with the looks of the pry and I know that I want one. I want to wait until I move to the country but who knows when that will happen or if it ever will. I thought if I got a pyr now that it would have my husky to play with and to keep it busy cause she would drive it crazy wanting to play all the time. I will probably get chickens again in the spring. But they cant be near my husky. I dont know.... It is probably best not to get a pyr at this point JUST BECAUSE I want one. I have to think past my wants to what would be best for the dog. I know most breeds can adapt to where they are but I didnt know how this breed would do. Thanks for the opinions.
     
  19. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I knew a couple who had a Pry that worked out great for them. They lived in the country, but the dog was a pet. His job was to protect the three foster women (mentally retarded) who lived there. The women could go outside, get the mail, answer the door, that sort of thing, and nobody could take advantage of them.
     
  20. longshadowfarms

    longshadowfarms Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad you wrote the last sentences because it seemed like you were repeating the first scenario. Can I suggest that you contact a local rescue or find a Pyr breeder close enough to visit? Spend as much time as possible meeting Pyrs, getting to know a number of individuals, preferably even meet with two or more breeders and see the differences in the lines. If you can find someone who works them and shows them that would be even better. You really need to spend some time with these dogs and see if they are what you think they are. Get slobbered on. See the mess in the yards. Listen to the barking. See how very independent many of these dogs are. You may fall in love. You may change your mind. Personally I'm hooked. I can't imagine life without a Pyr. My current Pyr is quite playful. He is the first that I have had that is. I wouldn't count on a Pyr playing with your Husky. It might happen but then again, it might not. I do hope you find a dog that fits you perfectly, be it a Pyr or another breed of dog. As someone else mentioned, Newfies tend to be big fluffy lovemuffin couch potatoes. The Landseers are black and white which might appeal to you. Then again, I've heard of some of them that need jobs too!