Does ANYONE grow spelt?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mike in Pa, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. Mike in Pa

    Mike in Pa Well-Known Member

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    Any tips out there? Anyone grow it? Know special types to plant or special processing tips or even where to buy seed???

    Thanks a lot,
    Mike
     
  2. lilsassafrass

    lilsassafrass Well-Known Member

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    Mike

    We grow spelt, we have for over 15 years . It replaces oats(which brings next to nothing at market) in our feed ration, Personally. I cant say enough good about this small grain ,but unless you are growing it for personal use for feed , or for the organic grain market
    there really isnt much of a market at the elevators for it.
    Some times it goes by the name of winter oat, because you plant it in teh fall , same time as you would winter wheat(after the fly date), one of the draw backs is that you cannot use it at that time as a nurse crop for hay like you can for other small grains it has far to dense of a root system, good for erosion control though
    we use it on a corn, corn, beans, spelt, small grain/ hay rotation )some times planting a high protein haylage mix like pro-ton after we take the spelt off the field in july/august
    Spelt is a bit higher in protein than oats and other small grains, the stock like it and of coarse it's planted when the fields are dryer and the work load isnt as great.
    As far as I am concerned you can't get better than spelt straw , very absorbant and soft, we typically get over 3 dollar a bale when I have enough left over to sell . the other benefit , the same reason that keeps it from being a good nurse crop also helps to keep it clean from weeds. I have cut it for hay , dont much like it that way. my cows arent as keen on it,some one elses might be
    Donnaley Seed company bags the seed out of Wakeman, Ohio .check your grain dealer most can get the seed.
    Seeding rate is 2 units to the acre,and a 100lbsof T19/ acre or 150lbs of T12/acre The other option is to find some one who grows it locally and buy from them and clean and plant it out , however it tends to be very clean seed from the start , so if its last years seed you might get away with not cleaning it ,
    Now for human use , I would buy my spelt flour , it is hard to thresh clean like other small grains . think oats , some where along the line you need to get the hull off .. thats why you dont see much spelt flour on the market, and what there is its typically higher priced than I would pay for it .. many bulk food stores carry it , as well as sometimes you can find spelt bread.
    I hope this helps,
    Paula
    Hyde Park Farm
     

  3. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No, but I can spell growth....sorry, I just had to....
     
  4. John_in_Houston

    John_in_Houston Well-Known Member

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    I tried raisin bread once...
     
  5. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Mike,

    I don't but my neighbor down the road raises about 300 bushels a year for his own use for feed. Sorry I don't have more information.

    Mike
     
  6. Mike in Pa

    Mike in Pa Well-Known Member

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    Mike, you ain't by chance near Poland Ohio are you? I'm currently working there.


    lilsassafrass,

    thanksa lot that helped a lot. "think small grains" ... well I don't "think" much of any of it as I'm a newbie to it all ... I've never seen small grains in the field up close. I've only seen it cleaned. This is where my biggest problem is...

    Does anyone have a way to hull spelt (or oats) for a small amount for family use? Can be hard to hull ... what does that mean?

    See ... my son has some pretty concerning health issues. We think a large part is an allergy to wheat/gluten. Has effected his health, growth and immune system. He is totally off of it now. We need alternatives and are trying spelt. I'm with you about the high prices so I'm trying to grow things myself. We're talking 20' x 25' to start. Another 50' x 50' will hopefully be corn.

    Thjanks, Mike
     
  7. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Isn't Poland up near Lordstown? Our farm is about 50 miles or so south and west of there (by Carrollton). Our house is up towards Cleveland.

    Mike
     
  8. Mike in Pa

    Mike in Pa Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Mike. Poland is next to Boardman kind of near Youngstown. I just figured if it were close, maybe your neighbor would sell a pound or two ... doesn't sound too close though. I think I'm closing in on some though.


    Anyone: Will spelt "kernals" grow as seed? Do the kernals need to be hulled for planting? I've found a few places I can buy spelt kernals for consumption ... don't know if it's hulled ... I'd imagine so.
     
  9. lilsassafrass

    lilsassafrass Well-Known Member

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    Mike ..
    yes and no , they will both grow , if you have found a place where you can get cleaned hulled spelt,so you can grind your own it would sure save you a lot of time and energy
    there is a reason for spelt flour being so expensive , and even hard to locate
    when you use your flour in teh kitchen treat it like rye flour .. you will have to experiment as the very thing that makes spelt good for your uses makes it difficult in the kitchen (we are soo used to wheat flour) .. its low gluten feature ... I suspect that the few loaves of commercial spelt bread I have had have had gluten added .. or you might go one better and add lethicin to your product to give it the elasticity ..
    I have never tried using spelt as a cooked cereal , doubt it would be much different from any other porridge
    I think Carla Emory's book , gives a pretty good account of the process of
    field to loaf by hand ... you might check there to see the work involved and if you want to attenmpt it
    my suspicion is that you might want to devote your patch all to corn ..(or maybe to buckwheat .. a fast growing grain ,a little easier to process
     
  10. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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