Doe with hives on belly

Discussion in 'Goats' started by KimM, Apr 28, 2006.

  1. KimM

    KimM Student of goatology.

    Messages:
    3,131
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    I noticed my doe yesterday sitting down like a dog and then scratching (biting) her belly a few times. I didn't think that was too unusual until today when she was doing repeatedly. I checked her out and felt big welts/hives on her in an area about 10" around in front of her udder. The only thing I can think of is that almost a week ago, everyone got a CD/T shot. (in the neck) I'm thinking if the shot caused hives, I better have some epinephrine ready for her next shot. She is due to kid SOON.
    What do you think?
     
  2. momanto

    momanto SW FLORIDA HAPPYLAND

    Messages:
    440
    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2005
    Dont Know Anything About Your Kind Of Animal, But Could It Posibly Be Insect Bites?
     

  3. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    609
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Location:
    MA
    Insect bites would also be my guess. It is blackfly season here, and those buggers bite relentlessly. I would think that if it were an allergic reaction to the vaccine you would have noticed symptoms within an hour or so of giving the shot.
     
  4. Blue Oak Ranch

    Blue Oak Ranch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    256
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Is she lying down in the same place a lot during the day? If she is, my guess would be staph infection - like the bumps you'd see on the udder. If it's been damp, and she's been nest-digging, she could be getting to older, wetter layers of bedding. I'd try something like cleaning her belly well with non-scented baby wipes, let dry, and then a light spritz or rub of tea tree oil.

    If it's an allergic reaction, you can give her Benadryl - like one or two tablets (if your vet clears it for pregnant goats - I don't know anything about that for pregnant girls).

    Cheers!

    Katherine

    Blue Oak Ranch
     
  5. KimM

    KimM Student of goatology.

    Messages:
    3,131
    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    I don't think it's insect bites, we don't have many flies yet and no one else has any problems but thank you for the suggestions. I'll watch for them.

    Katherine, (Blue Oak Ranch) I think you may be onto something. She is nest digging and laying down A LOT but it's pretty dry sawdust bedding but even so, it'll be changed and put fresh down.
    What does staph look like??? (that doesn't sound at all good) Her udder is kind of bumpy, no redness, no 'sores', just tiny bumps like the texture of a football(?). I don't have any tea tree oil but what if I cleaned her good with iodine (horse) shampoo? Any other suggestions? :shrug:
    Geeze, horses are much easier but goaties are so fun!!
     
  6. Blue Oak Ranch

    Blue Oak Ranch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    256
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2005
    Staph infections on the skin usually look just like what you describe - little bitty bumps, usually at the hair follicle (point of entry). Many people get them on their does' udders if the bedding is damp, or if it's not clean. I was lagging last year during busy times about topping off with clean bedding in between pitching out the goat house - and I had this happen on one of my does when she was dry. I cleaned her udder well, spritzed with a chlorhexiderm teat dip (it's just what I had on hand), and let it dry. Did this a couple of times, and it cleared right up.

    You don't necessarily want to put anything too goopy on her udder - it won't let the skin breathe, and will trap bacteria next to the skin. Think clean and dry. I think the iodine will definitely help her condition.

    If it's been rainy where you are, damp bedding can make conditions right for the bacteria to proliferate - I started using wood chips under the straw, so the straw couldn't draw up moisture from the ground. Works great!

    Cheers!

    Katherine
     
  7. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    391
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2003
    Those are the milk veins, and are entirely normal. Making milk requires enormous blood flow to the udder, and those large, torturously curved veins are a big part of it.

    You should find a goat person locally, you know, to befriend. It would help you a lot.